Is Butter Or Margarine Better For Chocolate Chip Cookies
Butter Cookies

Is Butter Or Margarine Better For Chocolate Chip Cookies

  • January 14, 2022

If you’re ready to perfect your cookie-making game then you’ll love that article.But while my fingers were flying across the keyboard typing that post, I found myself thinking of so many more things I could tell you {or even show you} about cookie baking if we were sitting across the kitchen, chatting over a cup of coffee.I decided to put the Nestle Toll House Original Cookie Recipe to test here and made several batches of cookies with different combinations of butter and shortening, and also refrigeration and no refrigeration.But before we get into comparison pictures, let’s talk a little bit about the difference between shortening and butter.Because of the milk and water in butter, it will melt more quickly under heat than shortening will.Butter adds a rich flavor to baked goods.I knew cookies baked with shortening didn’t spread as much, but look at those results!Refrigerating cookie dough with shortening didn’t do anything in my eyes.You get some of that butter flavor, but the cookies still hold their shape and don’t run all over the pan.By refrigerating the dough for an hour and baking for about 9 minutes, the cookies stay crisp on around the very edges and a little soft & chewy in the middle.Now remember that we ran these experiments with the Nestle Toll House Cookie Recipes. .

Tips for Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Tips for Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Tips for Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

I first made these when we were in the Philippines, when it was a struggle to just keep butter solid for 2 seconds on the counter, and they were absolutely incredible.Now I’m back home in dry, cool Minnesota and I have been waiting for this day just so I could figure out what would really make these cookies awesome for you.Since I’m responsible for bringing some treats up the cabin for my big family and I had an excuse to make excessive amounts of cookies, I made these.So here are my semi-scientific but mostly trial-and-error regular home cook tips for perfect chocolate chip cookies that look like this on the inside.And I guess by good quality I mean the grocery store budget brand.So literally I heat the stick of butter until roughly half of it is melted.I sometimes stick it in the fridge or freezer to help speed up the process but then I let it sit on the counter for a few minutes to come back to room temperature before actually making the dough.I also notice that when I get just the right amount of flour in the dough, it makes kind of a delicate sticky noise when I stir it.The slightly different tastes of the chocolate and the varied shapes and sizes of the chips make for a more interesting (ehmm, more chocolatey) cookie.This is a weird one, but I always have better luck getting that awesomely thick and buttery cookie when I make half of my favorite recipe.For the recipe in this post, I found that I actually really didn’t need to refrigerate the dough as long as I had enough flour, but sometimes you bake the first batch and you get spread-flat-cookie-city.I’ve spooned dough without shaping, I’ve used a special cookie dough scoop to get the rounded top, and yet the thing that works best for me is shaping them by hand.For a regular baker like myself, sometimes baking just feels like a little bit of dumb luck.Even if your cookies didn’t turn out juuust how you wanted them, I bet your dough still tastes pretty darn good, right?I wanted to show you my three failed batches during testing, and the things that I think made them turn out the way that they did.Yield: 10 – 12 big cookies 1 x Print Recipe Pin Recipe Description Here are my simple tips for perfect chocolate chip cookies with an easy recipe for my all-time favorite, classic, perfect chocolate chip cookie.egg 1 1/4 cup all purpose flour (to start, but plan to add a few tablespoons).all purpose flour (to start, but plan to add a few tablespoons) 1/2 teaspoon baking soda.salt 1 cup mixed varieties of chocolate chips Instructions Turn the oven on to 350 degrees.Let the butter come back to room temperature for at least 30 minutes – it doesn’t have to harden completely but it should be a soft solid.Add the eggs and beat until incorporated.. Measure in the flour, baking soda, and salt.Slowly mix with the electric mixer on low speed, scraping the sides, until all the flour is incorporated.If the dough sticks to the sides of the bowl and looks wet, add one tablespoon of extra flour at a time until the dough feels dry and sticks together in one large ball.Roll 1/4 cup dough into high, round balls with chocolate chips at the top.You want to take them out when they are puffy and just a tiny bit brown on the tops and edges.Let stand for a few minutes – they will lose a little of their puffiness but they should stay thick and hold together well.I am so excited to hear about your great aunt’s secret tip for using cornstarch, or how your grandma uses pudding mix, or how you buy a certain brand of butter and only use your own milled flour, or whatever else you do to make your cookies awesome.Update May 2015: I have recently posted a new version of this recipe that still gets the soft texture WITHOUT requiring any high maintenance butter melting/cooling. .

How to Substitute Margarine for Butter

How to Substitute Margarine for Butter

How to Substitute Margarine for Butter

(Oh, since you mentioned it, Burnt Toast is back in action tomorrow, yay!).Which means, we now have a whole generation of wrinkled and ripped, stained and yellowing family recipe cards for baked goods—you know, the best ones—that call for margarine instead of butter.While margarine is still alive and kicking—especially for vegan, plant-based recipes—most contemporary bakers prefer using unsalted butter.Without getting into a bunch of legal jargon, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines margarine as a combination of oils made from either vegetable or animal fat that are then combined with either water or milk, optional added vitamins, salt, preservatives, sweeteners, emulsifiers, and whole bunch of other additives.For baking, stick margarine sold by brands like Land O’Lakes became popular for its firmer texture, which acted more like real butter than whipped butter spreads that you’d want to smear on King's Hawaiian Sweet Rolls (at least, that’s what I do on Thanksgiving at my Grandma’s house).In 2015, the FDA put a ban on partially hydrogenated oils in food products, such as margarine, after determining that they posed a significant health risk to humans.Many home cooks believed margarine was the healthier product because butter supposedly contained higher levels of saturated fats, which were seen as a possible cause of heart disease.Also, the sugar is all powdered, which includes cornstarch, which helps create a tender crumb.“I can see how pound cake traditionalists might prefer marg!” one taste tester noted.The butter-fied version was more colorful on top, with a slightly lighter, fluffier, drier interior.Betty Crocker’s original chocolate chip cookies from 1969 call for margarine and shortening.Today, her Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookies call for “butter or margarine.” Same difference, Betty says?These somewhat unexpected results from our test kitchen reveal that yes, you can use certain types of margarine in place of butter when cooking and baking, but the final product may not taste exactly as intended. .

Which Fat Is The Best For Making Chocolate Chip Cookies?

Which Fat Is The Best For Making Chocolate Chip Cookies?

Which Fat Is The Best For Making Chocolate Chip Cookies?

Most conventional recipes begin with this step of mechanical leavening, so in a manner of speaking, the fat sets the tone for the cookie you'll end up making."While butter is best known for it’s rich dairy flavor, it's also a wonderful tenderizer and leavener," says Zac Young, pastry director for Craveable Hospitality Group. .

Baking Cookies: Butter Vs. Shortening Vs. Margarine

For some people, baking a perfect cookie is a difficult task that requires careful consideration and ample practice.No matter how you enjoy them, the ingredients you use ultimately determine the flavor, texture and consistency of the cookie.In fact, making a simple switch between butter, shortening and margarine while baking cookies can have drastic effects on your final product.This usually results in flatter, crispier cookies -- and if you're not careful, they will easily burn to a crisp if baked too long.Although it might be nutritionally beneficial to choose the option with the lowest fat content, the cookies' taste and texture will be impacted.Using solid butter or boiling it to a thin liquid will significantly change the ultimate texture of the cookie.Similarly, if the recipe calls for room-temperature margarine or shortening, be sure to pull the product out of the refrigerator several hours before you plan to bake the cookies. .

Oatmeal Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies {Without Butter or

Oatmeal Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies {Without Butter or

Oatmeal Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies {Without Butter or

You’ll get new recipes, cooking tips, menu suggestions, kitchen deals – and more!I figured that with the Northeast all snowed in under a “blizzard of the century,” you’d all be baking cookies, and would appreciate a new one to try.Well, turns out that the entire world (or so it seems) was baking cookies, but this one wasn’t part of them.Mostly because I took the day off to be lazy and spend a lot of time in bed and on the couch.Oh, and because y’all have given me such great feedback on my cookies without butter or margarine, I’ve kept them out of this recipe too.4.7 from 15 reviews Print Oatmeal Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies {Without Butter or Margarine} Author: Miriam Pascal, OvertimeCook.com Recipe type: dessert Prep time: 10 mins Cook time: 9 mins Total time: 19 mins Serves: about 4 dozen Originally published in my column in Ami Magazine Ingredients ¾ cup oil.¾ cup chocolate chips Instructions Preheat oven to 375.In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat together the oil and peanut butter until smooth, about a minute.Add the vanilla extract, baking soda and eggs, beating to combine after each addition.Make sure to follow me on your preferred social media channels to stay updated on all the latest recipes! .

The BEST Chocolate Chip Cookies

The BEST Chocolate Chip Cookies

The BEST Chocolate Chip Cookies

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases (at no cost to you) that will help support this website.And with this recipe, I show you how to easily tweak each ingredient to get the BEST flavor and texture profile that YOU love, with your chocolate chip cookies!I’ve also provided tips to store baked or unbaked cookies for later.These chocolate chip cookies are soft and chewy – just the way I love ’em!If baking is a labor of love, then chocolate chips cookies are the ultimate payoff.I’ve tested variations of my classic chocolate chip cookie recipe to find out how to alter the texture and flavor for optimal results.The cookies made with melted butter spread a tad more, but this difference is even less after the dough has been chilled (for a minimum of 1 hour).Personally though, I prefer making chocolate chip cookies with melted butter, because this gives me the opportunity to do so much more in terms of changing up the flavor.Here are a few of my favorite ways to infuse flavor into the butter when making chocolate chip cookies.This is easily my absolute favorite way of enhancing the flavor of classic chocolate chip cookies.This is easily my absolute favorite way of enhancing the flavor of classic chocolate chip cookies.This is another great way to elevate the flavor profile of your chocolate chip cookies.Baking powder will create more lift and a more cake-like texture which makes the cookie softer.The combination of both gives you the best of both worlds, and that’s MY favorite version of a chocolate chip cookie.If you prefer chocolate chip cookies that are not too soft, then leave out the baking powder.AP flour is predominantly what I’ve used in the past, and will give you the flavor and soft texture profile that you typically associate with chocolate chip cookies.If you think you’ve added enough chocolate chips to the cookie dough, then add a little more!Is it worth to take that extra time to brown your butter first for the BEST chocolate chip cookie ever?Is it worth to take that extra time to brown your butter first for the BEST chocolate chip cookie ever?A combination of granulated white sugar (for crisp chocolate chip cookies), and dark brown sugar (for soft chocolate chip cookies with great butterscotch flavor) is highly recommended.(and the vanilla) at this stage too, so that the salt has time to dissolve and season the cookies evenly.Once you’ve mixed the butter and sugar, it’s time to add the eggs.Adding too much air when mixing in the eggs can interfere with the texture of the baked cookies and cause them to rise too much.AP flour + baking soda = More chewy chocolate chip cookies.This combination produces cookies that have a delightful blend of soft and chewy textures.It’s easier to portion the cookie dough on a baking tray first and then chill.It’s easier to portion the cookie dough on a baking tray first and then chill.These cookies are best eaten while a little warm, because the chocolate will be gooey and melted inside.Make sure to store the cookies in an air-tight container, at room temperature and NEVER in the fridge.Place a slice of bread OR a few tortillas in the same container along with the cookies, but replace the bread/tortilla every other day.The reason for bread or tortilla is that their moisture gets absorbed by the cookies, keeping them nice and soft, which prevents them from going stale.Maybe it’s because I grew up in New Zealand, but a chocolate chip cookie just isn’t the same for me if it’s not eaten warm!This makes the cookies a little softer, with lots of melted chocolate chunks inside.For a nice flavor kick – unsalted browned butter (cooled).Half dark brown sugar (gives the cookies a soft texture and a butterscotch flavor).You want to allow the sugar to melt in the butter, and form a smooth emulsified mix, WITHOUT adding any air into the mixture.I like adding baking powder to mine, along with bread flour to get a nice balance of chewy and soft texture in my chocolate chip cookies.For even better results, use couverture chocolate blocks that you cut into chunks yourself.If you don’t have a cookie scoop, you can make smooth round balls (20 of them), and then break the cookie balls in half, turn the two halves around and stick the soft sides back together – so that the rough broken sides are facing out.This way you also get nice and crackly surfaces on your baked chocolate chip cookies.Use a good quality semi sweet chocolate bar and chop it into pieces. .

Imperial Margarine Chocolate Chip Cookies

Imperial Margarine Chocolate Chip Cookies

Imperial Margarine Chocolate Chip Cookies

Simple – it’s cheap to make, pretty much fool proof to bake and turns out great every time.A quick and easy cookie to make, you can turn out a few dozen of these in no time.The one comment I’ll make is that the recipe calls for margarine – not softened or at room temperature.I’ve seen these cookies made with softened margarine and they turn out a bit thin and flat.Cut the margarine into 1 inch chunks – it’ll make the job a little easier.You now have no more excuses to not drop off a few dozen cookies at the next community, church or school event or bake sale. .

The Food Lab's Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

The Food Lab's Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

The Food Lab's Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Chopping the chocolate by hand creates large and small pieces for more textural and flavor contrast.An overnight rest allows enzymes to break down large carbohydrates, enhancing the caramelization and browning process the next day to help the cookies develop deeper flavor.Tearing apart and recombining the dough makes a rougher surface for craggier cookies.Wouldn't anyone be pleased to be married to someone who fills the house with the aroma of warm butter, caramelized sugar, and gooey chocolate?Then, as I glanced around the apartment, wiping chocolate-specked hands against my apron, running a finger across the countertop and tracing a line into the dusting of white powder that coated every surface in the kitchen, eyeing the dozens of bags of failed experimental cookies that blocked the television, opening the refrigerator door to discover that more than half of its contents were batches of uncooked cookie dough in various stages of rest, I thought, maybe she does have a point.I wake up in the middle of the night with a fresh idea, a new test to run, only to discover that my 10-pound flour bin has been emptied for the third time.I'd put on my coat and walk out in the cold New York winter night, my sandals leaving tracks in the snow as I wander the neighborhood, searching for a convenience store that will sell me flour at three in the morning."But I'm talking about chocolate chip cookies that are barely crisp around the edges with a buttery, toffee-like crunch".I made it my goal to test each and every element, from ingredients to cooking process, leaving no chocolate chip unturned in my quest for the best.Most traditional chocolate chip cookie recipes start with the same basic ingredients and technique: butter and a mix of granulated and brown sugar are creamed together with a touch of vanilla until fluffy, eggs are beaten in one at a time, followed by flour, salt, and some sort of chemical leavening agent (baking soda, baking powder, or a bit of both).This, coupled with the fact that they are fully exposed to the heat of the oven and are constantly reaching hotter areas of the baking sheet, causes them to begin to set long before the center of the cookie does.This, coupled with the fact that they are fully exposed to the heat of the oven and are constantly reaching hotter areas of the baking sheet, causes them to begin to set long before the center of the cookie does.This baking soda is then able to react with the acidic components of brown sugar, creating gases that cause the cookies to rise up and develop a more open interior structure.As the butter melts and the cookie's structure loosens, this frees up water, which in turn dissolves baking soda.This baking soda is then able to react with the acidic components of brown sugar, creating gases that cause the cookies to rise up and develop a more open interior structure.Once they get hot enough, egg proteins and hydrated starches will begin to set in structure, finalizing the shape and size of the finished cookie.At its hottest areas—the edges and the underbelly in direct contact with the baking sheet—sugar granules melt together, turning liquidy before starting to caramelize and brown, producing rich, sweet flavors.Meanwhile, the air in the center cools, which causes the cookie to deflate slightly; though when fully baked, the structure lent by eggs and flour will help it retain some of its rise.My first course of action was to test out these basic ingredients one at a time in order to determine how they affect the final outcome.Gluten can't form in fat, thus butter will inhibit its overall formation, leading to more tender results.Because of shortening's different melting qualities (and the fact that it has no water content), shortening-based cookies come out softer but more dense than those made with butter.In the early creaming stages of making a cookie, cool butter is beaten until it's light and fluffy.Melting butter before combining it with sugar and eggs leads to squatter, denser cookies.Substituting butter with a less flavorful fat like shortening or margarine yielded sub-par cookies.Cookie Fact #4: Browned Butter = Less Moisture and Less Dissolved Sugar = Less Caramel Flavor.My friend Charles Kelsey, the man behind the fantastic Brookline, MA sandwich shop Cutty's, developed a simple chocolate chip cookie recipe for Cook's Illustrated magazine back in 2009.In his recipe, he made the ingenious discovery that browning the butter before adding it to the mixture would give the cookies a much more pronounced nuttiness.So how do I get the flavor benefits of browned butter while still allowing for sugar to dissolve and caramelize properly?Other than the small amount in the butter, eggs are the main source of water in a cookie dough recipe.By keeping the total mass of egg added to a dough the same but altering the proportion of white to yolk, you can achieve a variety of textures.My next attempt with cooled brown butter fared better, but the finished cookies ended up with an oddly uniform texture and a relatively smooth top rather than the cragginess I'd been getting earlier.I settled on beating half of the sugar with the eggs until it completely dissolved, then incorporating the rest when I added the brown butter.By letting my browned butter cool down until it was almost at room temperature, it became firm enough to beat into the egg and sugar mixture without deflating it.Brown sugar is mostly crystallized sucrose, but also contains a good amount of glucose and fructose, along with trace minerals that give it its flavor and a slightly acidic pH.Slightly acidic brown sugar causes cookies to rise higher when baking, which limits their spread.Granulated sugar, on the other hand, adds no leavening power, so you end up with a cookie that spreads wide.A mixture of the two provides a good balance, and as I noticed in my egg tests, dissolving too much sugar can lead to a texture that's too uniform.I tried it, heating granulated sugar up in a pot until it was a golden amber before adding cold butter to rapidly chill it and then incorporating it into my dough.First off, it's a mess trying to scrape hot caramel out of a pan and prevent it from hardening into a single massive clump.Secondly, it made my cookies far too soft and chewy (I recalled that in the process of caramelizing sucrose, it breaks down into glucose and fructose, acquiring their hygroscopic properties).You end up with wide, flat cookies that stay soft and flexible even when completely cooled.Not only that, but since corn syrup is made up of simple sugars, it caramelizes more readily, leading to darker overall color.Corn syrup is so darn powerful, in fact, that even a small amount of it will completely alter the texture of your cookie.When dissolved in liquid and combined with an acid, it rapidly reacts, breaking down into sodium, water, and carbon dioxide.Moreover, because the Maillard reaction takes place more readily in mildly alkaline environments, baking soda has a powerful effect on how rapidly foods darken and develop browned flavors.Cookies made with all cake flour will be very soft, almost mushy, even when you've cooked them to what would normally be a beyond-crisp stage.Extra flour (a ratio of 1.3 to 1 or higher) will give you cookies that barely spread at all as they bake, with centers that stay dense and dough-like, even after being almost fully cooked.The dough above was made by really working the flour into the butter and egg mixture before subsequently folding in the chocolate chips.Because extra kneading creates a stronger gluten network, the cookies also end up rather tough.If you like extra craggy cookies, Baking Illustrated offers a neat tip for increasing that cragginess: tear the balls of dough apart with your fingertips and smoosh 'em back together with the jagged torn part facing outwards.Provided you've used enough flour and your other ratios are spot on, those crags should appear in the cookies' final baked form.will cause some degree of layering in the dough, creating a flakier cookie with larger sections of molten chocolate.Chopped chocolate produces the most contrast—the small bits of debris and chocolate shavings get dispersed throughout the cookie dough, disrupting its texture and giving a nice chocolatey flavor to the whole affair, while larger chunks still melt into large gooey pockets.I spent an awful lot of time experimenting with how the temperature of the dough during chocolate incorporation can affect the final outcome of the cookie.The result is a sort of swirl effect that can be quite delicious if you do it carefully, though you miss out on the classic large melty pockets.When baked at a lower temperature, the dough has more of a chance to spread out, leading to flatter, wider cookies.Moreover, the lower the oven temperature, the more evenly the cookie bakes, with less of a contrast between the edges and the center.In fact, when the oven temperature gets low enough (around 275°F (135°C) and below), you completely lose any contrast, producing a cookie that's more or less homogenous across the board.As you can see, cookies baked straight from the fridge will stay a little more compact, while those that are allowed to warm will spread more.I found that baking in a 325°F (160°C) oven until the edges are nice and toasty brown will leave you with a cookie that's still plenty soft and chewy in the center.Back when the New York Times published that Jacques Torres recipe in 2008, I'd never heard of the concept of resting a cookie dough, yet Mr. Chocolate himself insisted that it was the secret to better flavor.During the process of browning, those large structure are broken down into smaller parts and individual pieces and subsequently rearranged.We're talking, oh, a million puppies on the moon wearing superhero underpants under their little doggie spacesuits levels of awesome.When all is said and done, my final recipe has ended up combining some unique techniques from a couple of my favorite recipes—the browned butter from Charles Kelsey's Cook's Illustrated recipe and the resting from Jacques Torres' New York Times recipe—along with a couple of my own novel twists—dissolving half the sugar in the eggs and chilling the browned butter with ice before incorporating—to produce a cookie that hits all the right notes.A deep, rich, butterscotch-and-toffee flavor; crisp edges; a soft, chewy center; an irregular crumb structure with a craggy top; and a mix of chocolate dispersed through the cookie in fine threads and big gooey pockets, all with a nice sweet-and-salty balance.Heck, if you want to know the truth, I've baked four batches of cookies while I was writing this article, which means that even as I hit that "publish" button, this recipe is already obsolete, a work in progress.My wife went to bed over five hours ago and left by giving me a gentle hug from behind and a soft whisper in my ear: "Please stop making cookies.".The beauty of understanding how ingredients interact with each other is that even if my definition of the "best" chocolate cookie isn't in line with yours, if you've come along this far, then you know what you need to do to adjust my recipe to suit your own tastes. .

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