Is It Better To Use Butter Or Shortening When Baking Cookies
Butter Cookies

Is It Better To Use Butter Or Shortening When Baking Cookies

  • June 23, 2022

Shortening traps more air bubbles and has a higher melting point than butter, so recipes that use shortening tend to produce an end product that will rise a little higher, holds its shape during baking, and has an interior texture that is softer or lighter.We tested a few classic recipes, cookies, pies and cake, the only difference was using butter or shortening.Cookies are a good example of where you see a difference in baking results using butter versus shortening in a recipe.Cookies made with only butter may not rise as much and may spread a bit more, but the edges will be crispier and will have a rich buttery taste.The butter cookie provides better flavor and a crispier exterior with some good browning around edges and a chewy interior.Shortening is 100% vegetable oil, which allows for a higher melting point than butter, so it stays solid within the pie crust dough in your oven longer.When the shortening finally melts, steam forms in pockets and it puffs the layers of dough apart, making a flaky, but not as flavorful as butter, crust. .

Shortening vs Butter in Cookies {What Makes the Best Chocolate

Shortening vs Butter in Cookies {What Makes the Best Chocolate

Shortening vs Butter in Cookies {What Makes the Best Chocolate

If you’re ready to perfect your cookie-making game then you’ll love that article.But while my fingers were flying across the keyboard typing that post, I found myself thinking of so many more things I could tell you {or even show you} about cookie baking if we were sitting across the kitchen, chatting over a cup of coffee.I decided to put the Nestle Toll House Original Cookie Recipe to test here and made several batches of cookies with different combinations of butter and shortening, and also refrigeration and no refrigeration.But before we get into comparison pictures, let’s talk a little bit about the difference between shortening and butter.Because of the milk and water in butter, it will melt more quickly under heat than shortening will.Butter adds a rich flavor to baked goods.I knew cookies baked with shortening didn’t spread as much, but look at those results!Refrigerating cookie dough with shortening didn’t do anything in my eyes.You get some of that butter flavor, but the cookies still hold their shape and don’t run all over the pan.By refrigerating the dough for an hour and baking for about 9 minutes, the cookies stay crisp on around the very edges and a little soft & chewy in the middle.Now remember that we ran these experiments with the Nestle Toll House Cookie Recipes. .

ONE TIP to make the BEST chocolate chip cookies -- it's all in the

ONE TIP to make the BEST chocolate chip cookies -- it's all in the

ONE TIP to make the BEST chocolate chip cookies -- it's all in the

Here’s one to consider that’s pretty gosh darn important though: Butter vs. shortening.Shortening has a higher melting temperature and doesn’t contain water, so your cookies are taller and softer.So use the recipe here (adapted from Nestle’s classic) or your own, but try the one-stick-of-each method and see if it makes a difference for you.2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips Instructions Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a bowl, briefly whisk together the flour, baking soda and salt.Drop by flat tablespoons on baking trays lined with parchment paper or Silpat.Bake for about 10 minutes, or until the edges start to brown and the center is firm.Cool on the tray for ten minutes and transfer to a wire rack.Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Facebook.Make sure to use solid, good quality baking trays or cookie sheets and line them with parchment paper or Silpat.Drop cookies on the sheet by flat tablespoons, preferably with a one-tablespoon ice cream scoop for even baking.They are done when the edges start to brown and the middle is firm.Cool on the sheet for ten minutes, then transfer to a wire rack.

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Shortening vs. butter in baking

Shortening vs. butter in baking

Shortening vs. butter in baking

But recently as I whipped up batches of cookies and a plethora of pies, I began to wonder about the difference between using shortening vs. butter in baking.It’s made by churning fresh or fermented cream, and then separating solids from the liquid (which is then sold as buttermilk).Even though these ingredients are clearly different, shortening and butter are often used interchangeably in recipes with acceptable results.Because of butter’s low melting point, the dough tends to spread during baking before the structure sets.As predicted, the cookies made with shortening spread less and remained slightly rounded, thanks to the higher melting point.Keep in mind this is just one reason why cookies spread; there’s a multitude of factors you can adjust if you’re committed to using butter for its rich flavor.Consider chilling your butter-based cookie dough to help control spread (and bonus, you'll also experience a wonderful depth of flavor, too!We know shortening adds tenderness since it's 100% fat, so some of us curious bakers started wondering what would happen if it was used to make cake.When shortening is creamed with sugar, it traps air molecules, which helps to leaven cakes and make them tender.It’s a sad sight to see a beautifully piped cake wilt in the sun as the baker stands by watching helplessly.We replicated hot, summery conditions (when so many of us cake bakers are called upon) by putting frosted cupcakes in a low oven for 10 minutes.There are other times when a can of Crisco is now the thing I reach for: when making pie crust, frosting, and even sandwich cookie filling.The virtue of butter vs. shortening is a passionate topic for many bakers, and we explore both here for their distinctive baking qualities.Each baker brings unique needs and perspectives to the table, and it’s our sincere hope everyone will choose ingredients that best embrace their personal goals.

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Absolutely the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Absolutely the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Absolutely the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

I have been looking for a chocolate chip cookie recipe using Butter Flavored Shortening for a long time.I used only the mixer bowl to make them by creaming the sugars with the shortening, then adding the eggs, then the vanilla, then the salt, and finally the baking soda.I found that I needed to add anywhere from 1/2 to 1 cup extra flour to make the dough less sticky. .

How to Substitute Butter for Shortening When Baking

How to Substitute Butter for Shortening When Baking

How to Substitute Butter for Shortening When Baking

Here you'll find our Test Kitchen's best tips for replacing shortening with butter when you're in a pinch.So your sweet tooth is calling and it's time for a baking therapy session.You start gathering your ingredients and baking tools only to find you don't have any shortening to make the classic peanut butter cookies you're craving.Fats and oils add flavor and contribute to the texture of baked goods, but they do work a bit differently.pressing shortening into measuring cup with spatula Credit: Kritsada Panichgul.Test Kitchen Tip: Because margarine and buttery spreads contain water, this reduces the fat in your recipe.There's no guarantee using margarine as a substitute for shortening or butter will yield desirable results.Test Kitchen Tip: If you've got open packages of both shortening and butter, you can use a combination of the two in your baking. .

Difference Between Butter and Shortening

Difference Between Butter and Shortening

Difference Between Butter and Shortening

Imagine all the things you love about a cookie: chewy or crisp, moist, flavorful and melts in your mouth.It is what imparts mouthfeel qualities, affects texture and structure, and most importantly packs your cookies with flavor.As its name implies, vegetable shortening is derived from plant sources – typically soybean or cottonseed oil.Since oil is naturally liquid at room temperature, how does vegetable shortening fit into the definition of being semi-solid or solid?Palm oil has a higher melting point and is usually added to make shortening harder without as much hydrogenation.Shortening has a higher melting point (117ºF/47ºC) than butter (95ºF/35ºC), which allows it to stay solid for longer and have its structure set, resulting in a cookie that spreads less and therefore, will be taller.If spreadability is something you worry about, it might be worthwhile to use shortening in cookies like Snickerdoodle with a high ratio of wet ingredients.For better structure, aim for a butter temperature of 65 to 67ºF (18 to 19ºC) to ensure its fat crystals are intact and are firm enough to hold the incorporated air bubbles from creaming.The flavor of butter is unrivaled and since shortening is essentially vegetable oil, it simply has a bland, oily taste.Traditionally, shortening made through hydrogenation produces trans fats which have gotten a bad rap.At face value, while butter may seem like the “healthier” option, it’s worth remembering that it’s still high in calories and saturated fat. .

Shortening: Good or Bad?

Shortening: Good or Bad?

Shortening: Good or Bad?

It’s typically made from hydrogenated vegetable oil and has a long history of use in American kitchens that dates back to the early 1900s.However, shortening has fallen out of favor in the past few decades because of its high trans fat content.Share on Pinterest Luis Alvarez/Getty Images The term “shortening” technically refers to any type of fat that is solid at room temperature, including butter, margarine, and lard.Until recently, shortening contained partially hydrogenated oil — a type of trans fat.However, the Food and Drug Administration completely banned trans fats in the United States as of January 2020 because they can disrupt cell membrane function, leading to an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and nervous system dysfunction ( 1 , 3 ).Shortening and other solid fats are preferable to liquid oils in baking applications like cookies, pie crusts, and cakes to create a tender, flaky end product.During normal mixing and baking, wheat flour’s gluten strands stretch and form a matrix.But when a fat such as shortening is cut into flour before baking, it coats the gluten strands, preventing them from lengthening and forming a tough matrix.However, we now know that highly processed shortening offers no health advantages over butter or lard and may in fact be a less nutritious choice ( 5 , 6 ).Yet full hydrogenation results in a very hard fat, which no longer has a soft, spreadable texture.In the past, health experts claimed that eating saturated fat was linked to a higher risk of heart disease ( 14 ).Still, since the information varies, you could follow the American Heart Association’s recommendation that only 5% to 6% of your daily calories come from saturated fat ( 17 ).Just be aware that the small amount of water in butter may result in a slightly different texture than shortening would.In recipes like pie crusts, where you cut solid fat into flour, liquid oil won’t give you the same flaky result.In baking, using liquid oil in place of shortening may result in a product that’s overly firm and has an uneven grain (22). .

Baking Cookies: Butter Vs. Shortening Vs. Margarine

Baking Cookies: Butter Vs. Shortening Vs. Margarine

Baking Cookies: Butter Vs. Shortening Vs. Margarine

For some people, baking a perfect cookie is a difficult task that requires careful consideration and ample practice.In fact, making a simple switch between butter, shortening and margarine while baking cookies can have drastic effects on your final product.When the cookies are baking, the dough is able to hold its shape for longer before the shortening begin to melt.This usually results in flatter, crispier cookies -- and if you're not careful, they will easily burn to a crisp if baked too long.Although it might be nutritionally beneficial to choose the option with the lowest fat content, the cookies' taste and texture will be impacted.Using solid butter or boiling it to a thin liquid will significantly change the ultimate texture of the cookie.Similarly, if the recipe calls for room-temperature margarine or shortening, be sure to pull the product out of the refrigerator several hours before you plan to bake the cookies. .

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