Best Flour For Soft Cookies
Flour Cookies

Best Flour For Soft Cookies

  • May 14, 2022

When it comes to baking perfect chocolate chip cookies, it sounds so simple.Keep reading to check out all the awesome cookie science results.Chocolate chip cookies were one of the first things I remember attempting on my own in the kitchen.And what I remember most is that every time I attempted chocolate chip cookies the results always differed.Understanding how the ingredients function will help you achieve the perfect cookie in the end.This means that the flour can be responsible for making our cookies: chewy, cakey, even dry and crumbly.Amount Of Flour Used – incorrect measuring can result in a cookie that is dry and crumbly vs. chewy and delicous.For example, a cookie where you want it to hold their shape – like shortbread or biscotti – more flour will be used in proportion to the liquid.This protein, like a slinky can stretch and expand which means it can provide lots of structure and shape (aka rolling it into thin sheets of puffy pastry), can trap gasses (aka carbon dioxide when baking bread), and provide that chewiness we love (think breads, and al dente pastas).Which means the amount of gluten that forms will vary based on the type of flour that you choose to use.Of course to fully understand what happened with each cookie batch made with the different flours.The higher the protein content, the more structure it will provide for your cookies.But this flour can also be used to give more structure to your chocolate chip cookies.This is your go to flour for cakes and other baked goods where tenderness is favorable.But you can also try using cake flour in your muffins, scones, even your cookies for a tender baked good in the end.You will also notice a difference in color with this flour and that is again due to the fact that all 3 parts of the kernel are used.Best Used For: Cookies, Bread, Waffles, Pancakes, Pizza dough, Pasta.Because most Americans measure by volume (aka you use your measuring cups) instead of by weight (using a kitchen scale) the amount of flour that ends up in the cup can vary.Stuff it to the brim the point you have to sit it on it in order to zip it (yup I’m this kind of packer).I always use either a small spatula or the back of a butter knife to get this part done.This chocolate chip cookie recipe used 1 1/2 cups unbleached all purpose flour.Here are the results of the cookie tests I did with changing the type (or amount) of flour used.As you can tell just by changing the flour resulted in quite a different cookie each time.The bread flour gave it a little more structure due to the higher protein content.Because cake flour has a lower protein content this cookie I found was a bit softer and more delicate.This cookie was probably the closest in texture and appearance compared to the control recipe.But I will say that I noticed that the cookie didn’t spread as much, have quite the same crispy edges and was a bit softer.Because bleached flour has a slightly lower protein content than unbleached flour due to the bleaching process, it did change the texture slightly.I added in an extra 1/2 cup of flour to the control recipe.Because of the extra flour, the cookie was thicker and didn’t spread as much.Without the right amount of flour to provide structure, this cookie spread into a big old puddle.So if you find your cookies spread too much, then it may be due to the wrong of amount of flour used.Just changing the type of flour or the amount can yield very different cookies!If you like this cookie science post, let me know and leave me a comment and star rating below! .

Which Flour Is The Best For Making Chocolate Chip Cookies?

Which Flour Is The Best For Making Chocolate Chip Cookies?

Which Flour Is The Best For Making Chocolate Chip Cookies?

There's variability, of course, and playing around with this key ingredient can make your cookies chewy, crispy, cakey, or extremely soft.We stuck to five of the most popular varieties and combinations of flours that professional bakers swear by, keeping all other variables constant.We used the classic Nestlé Toll House cookie formula as our base recipe and simply swapped out the flour, keeping the quantity the same. .

Baking Better Cookies Through Chemistry

Baking Better Cookies Through Chemistry

Baking Better Cookies Through Chemistry

You make many decisions when deciding on a cookie recipe: which kind of flour, which fat, which sweetener, which leavener, whether to add liquid.Your choices determine if the cookie will be flat and crisp or soft and puffy, pale gold or deep brown.The walnut–chocolate chip cookies on the left (below) are puffy, soft, and pale.cake flour (low protein, acid)/ more steam and puff; less browning.all brown sugar (hygroscopic, acid)/ soft and moist; less spread when used with egg.Cookies made with sugars that are high in sucrose (granulated sugar and maple syrup) or glucose (corn syrup) tend to stay crisp.Fructose is hygroscopic (meaning it absorbs water from the air), so cookies made with a lot of honey get soft upon standing.Brown sugar is also slightly acidic, so it can help limit spread in cookies using an egg.Shortening, on the other hand, melts at a higher temperature, so cookies have more time to set in the oven and will stay domed.In most cookie recipes, the amount of soda is excessive for leavening and is used primarily for color.The amount and type of liquid can influence the spread and puff of cookies.This is particularly true if there’s an acidic ingredient (such as brown sugar, cake flour, or chocolate), which makes the egg set quickly to limit spread. .

The Best Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

The Best Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

The Best Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Just ultra thick, soft, classic chocolate chip cookies!Watch How To Make Our Best Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies:.and maybe even improved the flavor with this version that is similar, but way easier and more sensible than the original.Chocolate Chip Cookies: Frequently Asked Questions.The three most important things about this recipe are 1) Melting the butter, 2) Adding enough flour, and 3) Not baking for too long.If you find that the dough is wet and it REALLY sticks to your hands, you probably need more flour.Can I freeze chocolate chip cookie dough?Roll them up into balls, freeze them on a sheet pan, and then keep them in a bag in the freezer until ready to bake.We’d recommend letting them thaw on a sheet pan (covered) before baking.The cookies can be kept in an airtight container at room temperature for 3-4 days, or in the fridge for a week.But there is one thing that I love more than anything in the world – yep – going there, and that is a really good, thick, soft, chocolate chip cookie with a glass of milk.Today, tonight, whenever it is, if you’re going to eat a cookie, please make it count.From our recipe tester: If you’re running into issues with your cookies, you can reference the examples above to help find out what may have gone wrong.One of the keys to achieving the perfect cookie is to ensure the correct amount of flour is used.In testing, we found that 6.75 ounces of flour was the correct amount.Just ultra thick, soft, classic chocolate chip cookies!Ingredients Units US M Scale 1x 2x 3x 8 tablespoons of salted butter.Using a stand mixer or electric beaters, beat the butter with the sugars until creamy.Add the vanilla and the egg; beat on low speed until just incorporated – 10-15 seconds or so (if you beat the egg for too long, the cookies will be stiff).Bake for 9-11 minutes until the cookies look puffy and dry and just barely golden.Warning, friends: DO NOT OVERBAKE.They will sink down and turn into these dense, buttery, soft cookies that are the best in all the land. .

The Best Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe by Tasty

The Best Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe by Tasty

The Best Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe by Tasty

Number one: Don’t use chips; instead, opt for a mix of milk or semisweet and dark chocolate chunks. .

14 tips for perfect chewy cookies

14 tips for perfect chewy cookies

14 tips for perfect chewy cookies

Put these tips to good use and make a batch of vintage chocolate chip cookies .Whether you grab them straight out of the oven, want them cool and chewy or prefer them crisp and buttery, there’s a cookie recipe for you.Butter brings about that richer, fluffier, textured dough, which results in the melt-in-your mouth crumbliness we all know and love.Go for pure butter with nothing added and no sunflower or vegetable oils/emulsifiers; these reduce the meltingly good result.The type of sugar you use will affect the flavour, colour and depth of your cookie.You can mix sugars to achieve caramelised sweetness, golden colouring and the perfect chew...Mixed in equal parts with caster sugar, this adds serious crunch and a firmer, more biscuit-like finish.The finer sugar granules add sweetness and beats together perfectly with softened butter for any base cookie dough.This unrefined version of the classic white caster has gone through less processing and has more caramel notes due to its darker colour.It's a great replacement for white caster sugar in any cookie recipe if you’re looking for something with a nutty, caramelised flavour.Most cookie recipes will mix white caster sugar and light brown soft sugar, which marry together extremely well to form a cookie that has caramelised flavour and a soft texture.Truth be told, you’ll usually find some form of raising agent has been added to any plain flour recipe, so you can just use self-raising.Make sure your flour is in date and is sealed well once opened to keep the raising agent from deactivating.Just add 1 tsp of baking powder for every 100g plain flour to make it self-raising.There's no right or wrong when choosing the size of the chips you use, the percentage of cocoa solids or which chocolate to go for.This is the process of beating softened butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.Use your hands to mix the chips in; you may find it easier than using a wooden spoon.Use an ice cream scoop to shape each cookie dough ball and transfer to a baking tray lined with parchment.Cover with cling film before chilling overnight, then bake straight from the fridge.Roll your dough into a log shape, then cover with cling film and chill.If you go for a darker sugar, the baking time will decrease as the caramelisation process can result in a crisper baker.Chelsie Collins was previously BBC Good Food's cookery writer and now runs London's first milk and cookie bar, Blondies Kitchen. .

Gluten Free Sugar Cookies

Gluten Free Sugar Cookies

Gluten Free Sugar Cookies

Anyway the sugar cookie recipe I used back then was on the crisp side to accommodate royal icing vs fluffy frosting, but what I’ve been craving this holiday season is a soft and chewy sugar cookie – made gluten free of course!For example, coconut flour requires a ton of liquid/moisture when added to gluten free baking recipes.Start by adding salted butter that’s been softened to room temperature (NOT MELTED) and white sugar to the bowl of an electric mixer, or a large glass bowl if using a hand held mixer.In a separate bowl, stir together the dry ingredients: gluten free flour WITH added binder, baking powder, and salt.If you want to turn the sugar cookie dough into drop cookies, scoop out 2 Tablespoon portions of the dough then roll into balls, place onto a silpat or parchment paper-lined baking sheet at least 2″ apart, then gently press down with your fingers to slightly flatten.Bake for 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees or until the centers of the cookies have just barely set.Pull them out of the oven just shy of being golden brown around the edges to ensure they stay soft and chewy in the center.If you’d like to make cut out cookies with cookie cutters, divide the dough in half then wrap each half in plastic wrap and refrigerate until completely chilled – a couple hours or overnight.Once chilled, remove one dough disc from the fridge then place it onto a sheet of parchment paper.Working quickly, cover with another sheet of parchment paper then roll 1/4″ thick.Both the dough and baked gluten free sugar cookies freeze beautifully.Thaw the dough in the refrigerator overnight then bake per recipe instructions.I hope you LOVE these sweet and chewy gluten free sugar cookies. .

Which All-Purpose Flour Is Best?

Which All-Purpose Flour Is Best?

Which All-Purpose Flour Is Best?

To prove our point, we asked 10 testers with different hand strengths and sizes to measure out and weigh 1 cup of each flour in our lineup. .

The Food Lab's Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

The Food Lab's Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

The Food Lab's Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Chopping the chocolate by hand creates large and small pieces for more textural and flavor contrast.An overnight rest allows enzymes to break down large carbohydrates, enhancing the caramelization and browning process the next day to help the cookies develop deeper flavor.Tearing apart and recombining the dough makes a rougher surface for craggier cookies.Wouldn't anyone be pleased to be married to someone who fills the house with the aroma of warm butter, caramelized sugar, and gooey chocolate?Then, as I glanced around the apartment, wiping chocolate-specked hands against my apron, running a finger across the countertop and tracing a line into the dusting of white powder that coated every surface in the kitchen, eyeing the dozens of bags of failed experimental cookies that blocked the television, opening the refrigerator door to discover that more than half of its contents were batches of uncooked cookie dough in various stages of rest, I thought, maybe she does have a point.I wake up in the middle of the night with a fresh idea, a new test to run, only to discover that my 10-pound flour bin has been emptied for the third time.I'd put on my coat and walk out in the cold New York winter night, my sandals leaving tracks in the snow as I wander the neighborhood, searching for a convenience store that will sell me flour at three in the morning."But I'm talking about chocolate chip cookies that are barely crisp around the edges with a buttery, toffee-like crunch".I made it my goal to test each and every element, from ingredients to cooking process, leaving no chocolate chip unturned in my quest for the best.Most traditional chocolate chip cookie recipes start with the same basic ingredients and technique: butter and a mix of granulated and brown sugar are creamed together with a touch of vanilla until fluffy, eggs are beaten in one at a time, followed by flour, salt, and some sort of chemical leavening agent (baking soda, baking powder, or a bit of both).This, coupled with the fact that they are fully exposed to the heat of the oven and are constantly reaching hotter areas of the baking sheet, causes them to begin to set long before the center of the cookie does.This, coupled with the fact that they are fully exposed to the heat of the oven and are constantly reaching hotter areas of the baking sheet, causes them to begin to set long before the center of the cookie does.This baking soda is then able to react with the acidic components of brown sugar, creating gases that cause the cookies to rise up and develop a more open interior structure.As the butter melts and the cookie's structure loosens, this frees up water, which in turn dissolves baking soda.This baking soda is then able to react with the acidic components of brown sugar, creating gases that cause the cookies to rise up and develop a more open interior structure.Once they get hot enough, egg proteins and hydrated starches will begin to set in structure, finalizing the shape and size of the finished cookie.At its hottest areas—the edges and the underbelly in direct contact with the baking sheet—sugar granules melt together, turning liquidy before starting to caramelize and brown, producing rich, sweet flavors.Meanwhile, the air in the center cools, which causes the cookie to deflate slightly; though when fully baked, the structure lent by eggs and flour will help it retain some of its rise.My first course of action was to test out these basic ingredients one at a time in order to determine how they affect the final outcome.Gluten can't form in fat, thus butter will inhibit its overall formation, leading to more tender results.Because of shortening's different melting qualities (and the fact that it has no water content), shortening-based cookies come out softer but more dense than those made with butter.In the early creaming stages of making a cookie, cool butter is beaten until it's light and fluffy.Melting butter before combining it with sugar and eggs leads to squatter, denser cookies.Substituting butter with a less flavorful fat like shortening or margarine yielded sub-par cookies.Cookie Fact #4: Browned Butter = Less Moisture and Less Dissolved Sugar = Less Caramel Flavor.My friend Charles Kelsey, the man behind the fantastic Brookline, MA sandwich shop Cutty's, developed a simple chocolate chip cookie recipe for Cook's Illustrated magazine back in 2009.In his recipe, he made the ingenious discovery that browning the butter before adding it to the mixture would give the cookies a much more pronounced nuttiness.So how do I get the flavor benefits of browned butter while still allowing for sugar to dissolve and caramelize properly?Other than the small amount in the butter, eggs are the main source of water in a cookie dough recipe.By keeping the total mass of egg added to a dough the same but altering the proportion of white to yolk, you can achieve a variety of textures.My next attempt with cooled brown butter fared better, but the finished cookies ended up with an oddly uniform texture and a relatively smooth top rather than the cragginess I'd been getting earlier.I settled on beating half of the sugar with the eggs until it completely dissolved, then incorporating the rest when I added the brown butter.By letting my browned butter cool down until it was almost at room temperature, it became firm enough to beat into the egg and sugar mixture without deflating it.Brown sugar is mostly crystallized sucrose, but also contains a good amount of glucose and fructose, along with trace minerals that give it its flavor and a slightly acidic pH.Slightly acidic brown sugar causes cookies to rise higher when baking, which limits their spread.Granulated sugar, on the other hand, adds no leavening power, so you end up with a cookie that spreads wide.A mixture of the two provides a good balance, and as I noticed in my egg tests, dissolving too much sugar can lead to a texture that's too uniform.I tried it, heating granulated sugar up in a pot until it was a golden amber before adding cold butter to rapidly chill it and then incorporating it into my dough.First off, it's a mess trying to scrape hot caramel out of a pan and prevent it from hardening into a single massive clump.Secondly, it made my cookies far too soft and chewy (I recalled that in the process of caramelizing sucrose, it breaks down into glucose and fructose, acquiring their hygroscopic properties).You end up with wide, flat cookies that stay soft and flexible even when completely cooled.Not only that, but since corn syrup is made up of simple sugars, it caramelizes more readily, leading to darker overall color.Corn syrup is so darn powerful, in fact, that even a small amount of it will completely alter the texture of your cookie.When dissolved in liquid and combined with an acid, it rapidly reacts, breaking down into sodium, water, and carbon dioxide.Moreover, because the Maillard reaction takes place more readily in mildly alkaline environments, baking soda has a powerful effect on how rapidly foods darken and develop browned flavors.Cookies made with all cake flour will be very soft, almost mushy, even when you've cooked them to what would normally be a beyond-crisp stage.Extra flour (a ratio of 1.3 to 1 or higher) will give you cookies that barely spread at all as they bake, with centers that stay dense and dough-like, even after being almost fully cooked.The dough above was made by really working the flour into the butter and egg mixture before subsequently folding in the chocolate chips.Because extra kneading creates a stronger gluten network, the cookies also end up rather tough.If you like extra craggy cookies, Baking Illustrated offers a neat tip for increasing that cragginess: tear the balls of dough apart with your fingertips and smoosh 'em back together with the jagged torn part facing outwards.Provided you've used enough flour and your other ratios are spot on, those crags should appear in the cookies' final baked form.When I first started testing, I figured that the only real question when it came to chocolate would be what brand and what cacao percentage.will cause some degree of layering in the dough, creating a flakier cookie with larger sections of molten chocolate.Chopped chocolate produces the most contrast—the small bits of debris and chocolate shavings get dispersed throughout the cookie dough, disrupting its texture and giving a nice chocolatey flavor to the whole affair, while larger chunks still melt into large gooey pockets.I spent an awful lot of time experimenting with how the temperature of the dough during chocolate incorporation can affect the final outcome of the cookie.The result is a sort of swirl effect that can be quite delicious if you do it carefully, though you miss out on the classic large melty pockets.When baked at a lower temperature, the dough has more of a chance to spread out, leading to flatter, wider cookies.Moreover, the lower the oven temperature, the more evenly the cookie bakes, with less of a contrast between the edges and the center.In fact, when the oven temperature gets low enough (around 275°F (135°C) and below), you completely lose any contrast, producing a cookie that's more or less homogenous across the board.I found that baking in a 325°F (160°C) oven until the edges are nice and toasty brown will leave you with a cookie that's still plenty soft and chewy in the center.Back when the New York Times published that Jacques Torres recipe in 2008, I'd never heard of the concept of resting a cookie dough, yet Mr. Chocolate himself insisted that it was the secret to better flavor.During the process of browning, those large structure are broken down into smaller parts and individual pieces and subsequently rearranged.We're talking, oh, a million puppies on the moon wearing superhero underpants under their little doggie spacesuits levels of awesome.When all is said and done, my final recipe has ended up combining some unique techniques from a couple of my favorite recipes—the browned butter from Charles Kelsey's Cook's Illustrated recipe and the resting from Jacques Torres' New York Times recipe—along with a couple of my own novel twists—dissolving half the sugar in the eggs and chilling the browned butter with ice before incorporating—to produce a cookie that hits all the right notes.A deep, rich, butterscotch-and-toffee flavor; crisp edges; a soft, chewy center; an irregular crumb structure with a craggy top; and a mix of chocolate dispersed through the cookie in fine threads and big gooey pockets, all with a nice sweet-and-salty balance.Heck, if you want to know the truth, I've baked four batches of cookies while I was writing this article, which means that even as I hit that "publish" button, this recipe is already obsolete, a work in progress.My wife went to bed over five hours ago and left by giving me a gentle hug from behind and a soft whisper in my ear: "Please stop making cookies.".The beauty of understanding how ingredients interact with each other is that even if my definition of the "best" chocolate cookie isn't in line with yours, if you've come along this far, then you know what you need to do to adjust my recipe to suit your own tastes.

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The Best Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

The Best Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

The Best Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

A few tricks make these gluten-free cookies perfect – soft, chewy, golden and irresistible!I’ve been eating 100% gluten-free for almost 6 years now and have finally found THE chocolate chip cookie recipe of my dreams.If you’ve tried making gluten-free chocolate chip cookies before you probably know they can turn out dry, grainy and pale.This recipe has a few tricks so you get golden, non-grainy cookies with a delicious depth of flavor every time.Brown butter gives these cookies a delectable nutty, toasty almost caramelized flavor that you can’t get from anything else.I like using a little almond flour because it is non-gritty and helps the cookies get that golden color and chewy texture.30 minute rest: Gives the flour time to hydrate and prevents grittiness.A sprinkle of sea salt: Optional, but delicious for gourmet bakery-style cookies! .

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