What Does More Flour Do To Cookies
Flour Cookies

What Does More Flour Do To Cookies

  • June 20, 2022

The central premise: What happens when you add more flour to a cookie recipe?How it all began (also known as the scientific question): Back in the day, when I was a wee little girl, I baked Snickerdoodles exclusively for about a year.Every few weeks, I would whip up a batch of these babies and every time, I managed to make a vastly different cookie.(Thankfully I’ve learned how to make consistent cookies.).But how did I make those cookies so thick and fluffy back in the day?Perhaps flour made fluffy, thick Snickerdoodles?I wanted to test this hypothesis, even though I had a feeling I knew the answer.Hypothesis: More flour in the Snickerdoodle cookie recipe would certainly yield a thicker, fluffier cookie because more flour meant less spread.Mom’s Snickerdoodle Cookie Recipe Author: Brita Prep time: 20 mins Cook time: 10 mins Total time: 30 mins Serves: 24-48 These are my mom’s classic Snickerdoodle cookie recipe and the recipe that I baked many times as a kid.A trick that I have is to roll the balls before I freeze them for easier baking.When you bake them from the freezer, let the dough thaw on the counter for a half hour.Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper or a Silpat mat.But the extra flour really didn’t affect taste all that much.The recipe with almost double the amount of flour was overdone on the bottom and gooey in the middle.The Snickerdoodle Recipe made with 1 1/4 cups + 2 Tablespoons flour.The Snickerdoodle Recipe made with 1 3/4 Tablespoons flour.The Snickerdoodle Recipe made with 2 cups flour.The results: This cookie spread the least, which isn’t surprising because it had the most amount of flour.Conclusion: I ended up going with cookie number 2 that had 1 3/4 cups flour. .

What Does Flour Do in Cookies? (And What Happens When Using

What Does Flour Do in Cookies? (And What Happens When Using

What Does Flour Do in Cookies? (And What Happens When Using

If you click one of these links and make a purchase, I may earn a commission at no additional cost to you.No matter what you choose to bake, there are a certain few ingredients that will find their way into just about every recipe you try to make.These staple ingredients include butter, sugar, salt, and flour.Flour can help the cookie rise properly in the oven, and it also plays a massive role in reaching the texture that you are looking for.Biscotti is one example of a cookie that needs a lot of flour, as it needs to hold a specific shape as it is cooking in the oven.Some degree of whole-grain flour will add nuttier and heartier undertones to the flavor of the cookie.Some recipes intentionally use skewed proportions to create specific textures, while other times you may come across the result of too much or too little flour by mistake.This will often happen when you use a high amount of flour in cookies that have very few wet ingredients, such as eggs and butter.This means that more flour will result in more rise, which is not always optimal if you want light, crisp cookies.On the other hand, low amounts of flour will commonly result in crisp, thin cookies. .

The Science of Baking Cookies

The Science of Baking Cookies

The Science of Baking Cookies

That’s because the structure of a baked good like a cookie has to be built from the ground up, and every ingredient flour, sugar, fat, eggs, leaven, and salt-plays a key role.Depending on its ratio to other ingredients in the dough, flour makes cookies chewy or crisp or crumbly.In dry cookie dough, like shortbread, a high proportion of flour to the small amount of liquid in the butter produces a tender, crumbly texture.In fluid-batter cookies like brownies, a lower proportion of flour to the amount of liquid or egg results in a cakey or chewy texture.For this reason, unbleached flour is a better choice where a slightly chewier texture is desired, as in drop cookies and nut bars.Aside from adding sweetness, granulated white sugar makes cookies browner (by caramelizing) and crisper (by absorbing moisture in the dough).The molasses adds moisture and, because it’s slightly acidic, causes the proteins in cookie dough to firm up faster, creating a chewier texture.When moistened and heated, the alkali and acid in baking powder react, neutralizing each another and giving off carbon dioxide gas, which aerates the dough, making the finished cookie puffier.Understanding how all of these ingredients work together can help you improve or even fix a cookie recipe when things go wrong.To see several practical examples of this knowledge in action, see our Test Kitchen piece on cookie troubleshooting.Beware of overmixing, which can turn chewy into tough, especially in dough that contains less than 50 percent fat by weight.Shaping Round dough balls take longer to bake, resulting in softer, thicker cookies.For even heating, use heavy-gauge aluminum baking sheets, and line the pans with parchment to minimize hot spots, prevent sticking, and speed cleanup.Oven position For best results, bake a single sheet of cookies on the center rack. .

Which Flour Is Best For Cookies?

Which Flour Is Best For Cookies?

Which Flour Is Best For Cookies?

When it comes to baking perfect chocolate chip cookies, it sounds so simple.Keep reading to check out all the awesome cookie science results.Chocolate chip cookies were one of the first things I remember attempting on my own in the kitchen.And what I remember most is that every time I attempted chocolate chip cookies the results always differed.Understanding how the ingredients function will help you achieve the perfect cookie in the end.This means that the flour can be responsible for making our cookies: chewy, cakey, even dry and crumbly.Amount Of Flour Used – incorrect measuring can result in a cookie that is dry and crumbly vs. chewy and delicous.For example, a cookie where you want it to hold their shape – like shortbread or biscotti – more flour will be used in proportion to the liquid.This protein, like a slinky can stretch and expand which means it can provide lots of structure and shape (aka rolling it into thin sheets of puffy pastry), can trap gasses (aka carbon dioxide when baking bread), and provide that chewiness we love (think breads, and al dente pastas).Which means the amount of gluten that forms will vary based on the type of flour that you choose to use.Of course to fully understand what happened with each cookie batch made with the different flours.The higher the protein content, the more structure it will provide for your cookies.But this flour can also be used to give more structure to your chocolate chip cookies.This is your go to flour for cakes and other baked goods where tenderness is favorable.But you can also try using cake flour in your muffins, scones, even your cookies for a tender baked good in the end.You will also notice a difference in color with this flour and that is again due to the fact that all 3 parts of the kernel are used.Best Used For: Cookies, Bread, Waffles, Pancakes, Pizza dough, Pasta.Because most Americans measure by volume (aka you use your measuring cups) instead of by weight (using a kitchen scale) the amount of flour that ends up in the cup can vary.Stuff it to the brim the point you have to sit it on it in order to zip it (yup I’m this kind of packer).I always use either a small spatula or the back of a butter knife to get this part done.This chocolate chip cookie recipe used 1 1/2 cups unbleached all purpose flour.Here are the results of the cookie tests I did with changing the type (or amount) of flour used.As you can tell just by changing the flour resulted in quite a different cookie each time.The bread flour gave it a little more structure due to the higher protein content.Because cake flour has a lower protein content this cookie I found was a bit softer and more delicate.This cookie was probably the closest in texture and appearance compared to the control recipe.But I will say that I noticed that the cookie didn’t spread as much, have quite the same crispy edges and was a bit softer.Because bleached flour has a slightly lower protein content than unbleached flour due to the bleaching process, it did change the texture slightly.I added in an extra 1/2 cup of flour to the control recipe.Because of the extra flour, the cookie was thicker and didn’t spread as much.Without the right amount of flour to provide structure, this cookie spread into a big old puddle.So if you find your cookies spread too much, then it may be due to the wrong of amount of flour used.Just changing the type of flour or the amount can yield very different cookies!If you like this cookie science post, let me know and leave me a comment and star rating below! .

Cookie Experiment

Cookie Experiment

Cookie Experiment

The most common being that you MUST chill your dough before cooking, and you shouldn't using completely melted butter.This experiment took a fair bit of prep, and pretty much a whole day of baking.So I decided to combine it with my last week at work and get my office friends involved in this taste test as part of my goodbye.My kids named themselves senior taste testers too, and took the job very seriously!!I used the recipe from my Classic Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies post as my control recipe (which I originally got from Sally's Baking addiction).Replaced baking soda with baking powder Baked the cookie dough balls from frozen (i.e go through the refrigeration stage, roll the dough into balls, and then freeze) Baked the cookies without refrigerating the dough Baked the cookies after refrigerating overnight - rather than for 2 hours Used all brown sugar (i.e 250g brown sugar) rather than a mix of brown and white sugar Used 15% more flour (the idea behind this was to see if I'd get a thicker cookie) Used completely melted butter instead of very soft/almost melted butter Used all white sugar (i.e 250g white sugar) rather than a mix of brown and white sugar.12 minutes would have been just fine (I discovered this later - after further experimentation with a number of cookie dough balls that I decided to freeze for 'emergencies').They were firm, crumbly, had a very cracked appearance on top, and a bit of a strange looking shine to them.If you don't refrigerate, you're dealing with a sloppy batch of cookie dough.This meant my hands were sticky, and the dough was basically splodged onto the baking mat.In an attempt to make these ones easier to handle, I also wet my hands before trying to form a couple of them into balls.Interestingly, I found that doing this meant that the resulting cookies didn't have the cracked, shiny appearance.These cookies had a real caramel flavour, they were chewy on the inside, crisp on the outside and were very tasty.The brown sugar produced a darker appearance than the other cookies.Using more flour produced a thicker cookie that spread less during baking.The overnight refrigeration really allowed those flavours to fully develop.Based on these results (and if you like a very flavoursome, soft and caramelly cookie) it may well be worth making your cookies using only brown sugar, and refrigerating the dough overnight.For me, I'll also be ensuring I have a good stock in the freezer so I can put one in the oven whenever the craving strikes!As a reminder, here's the basic control recipe (however the experiment results suggest you use just brown sugar instead of a mix of brown and white, and also chill the mixture overnight or cook the dough balls from frozen):.Cookie Experiment By: Nicky Corbishley Cookie Experiment - a visual and taste test using a control cookie and 8 minor changes to ingredient or technique 5 from 2 votes Print Recipe Pin Recipe Prep Time 2 hrs 15 mins Cook Time 13 mins Total Time 2 hrs 28 mins Course Snacks Cuisine American, British Servings 18 Calories 228 kcal Ingredients ▢ 280 g plain flour.▢ 180 g good quality chocolate chips INSTRUCTIONS In a bowl, mix together your flour, baking soda, cornflour and salt.In a large bowl, whisk together the butter and the two sugars until thoroughly combined.Add the flour mixture and mix together using a wooden spoon.Finally pour in your chocolate chips, reserving 1 tbsp of them to put on top later.Then place some clingfilm over the bowl and chill in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours (and up to 3 days).Roll the dough into a ball with your hands, and place on you baking sheet.Make sure your dough balls are a good distance apart on the baking sheet as they will spread.Place in the oven and cook for 10-13 minutes, depending on whether you like your cookies soft and chewy or a bit more crisp.Take out of the oven and push the reserved chocolate chips gently into the hot cookies. .

Fluffy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Fluffy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Fluffy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

If you love fluffy, soft, dense, gooey cookies, then this Fluffy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe with toasted pecans and two kinds of chocolate is for you!This Fluffy Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe is literally blowing my mind.Fun, secret ingredient mix-ins like a dash of cinnamon, a bit of almond extract, and pinch of cornstarch for extra fluffy cookies.If you want something a little smaller, be sure to check out my double chocolate chip cookie recipe, but I seriously think you should stick around to hear more about the awesomeness that is these fluffy cookies.Fluffy Chocolate Chip Cookies that are the size of your head, fresh outta the oven, with a side of ice cold milk?How do i make soft and cakey, thick, fluffy chocolate chip cookies?As with most cookie recipes, we’re gonna start by creaming some butter.Once the butter has creamed, two types of sugar get added in, then eggs, vanilla, and almond extract.Lastly, we add the dry ingredients: flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon <– this makes them extra cozy.Here are some common questions I get, because as we all know, baking can be tricky, so I’m here to help you troubleshoot if you’re having any issues (although, I don’t think you will, because these are SO easy to make).Melted butter will make these spread and could cause them to be greasy.😉 The top, bottom, and edges should be firm and golden, but the inside will still be nice and soft.These Fluffy Chocolate Chip Cookies are thick, dense, so soft and fluffy, full of melty chocolate, and get just a little crunch from the pecans. .

Chocolate Chip Cookie Science- Baker Bettie

Chocolate Chip Cookie Science- Baker Bettie

Chocolate Chip Cookie Science- Baker Bettie

There is no doubt in my mind that Chocolate Chip Cookies are the ultimate classic baked good and comfort food.And in my early baking years I set out on a mission to develop the most perfect chocolate chip cookie recipe ever.But this led to the question: What is my idea of the perfect chocolate chip cookie?A thick, chewy on the inside crunchy on the outside cookie that has hints of caramel and salt with dark chocolate chips and toasted pecans.Let’s start at the beginning with the Nestle Toll House Cookie Recipe.Chewy in the middle, slightly crispy on the edges, with a fairly one note flavor profile.Each ingredient of this recipe can be altered to change the final product based your own preferences.If you want cakier cookies increase the amount of flour to 2 1/2 cups.You can find this in the grocery store or create your own by grinding old fashioned oats in a blender to a fine crumb.If you want flatter cookies, eliminate the baking soda from the recipe.I usually increase it to 1 1/4 tsp and use Morton kosher salt for a more coarse flake.If you are wanting a nice chew to your cookies and have decided to opt for the bread flour, melt the butter.The water from the melted butter will mix with the flour to create more gluten.to your cookies and have decided to opt for the bread flour, melt the butter.If you want a flatter cookie, eliminate 1 egg and cut back the flour to 2 cups .add another egg white because it helps to dry out baked goods.If you prefer a moist and chewy cookie, eliminate one egg white and add 2 TBSP of milk.Or maybe you even want white chocolate chips or a combo of different kinds!If you want really soft cookies , pull them from the oven with the middles still look underdone.Always bake your cookies in small batches to produce even browning.Make sure you are using the spoon and level method of measuring your flour so you don’t end up with too much in your cookie dough!Using the rules as stated above I have made various cookie recipes over the years with a variety of textures.Below you will find my recipe for Perfect Thin & Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies. .

9 Quick Tips to Say Goodbye to Flat Chocolate Chip Cookies

9 Quick Tips to Say Goodbye to Flat Chocolate Chip Cookies

9 Quick Tips to Say Goodbye to Flat Chocolate Chip Cookies

If your chocolate chip cookies look like they should be served with maple syrup (a la pancakes), you’ve come to the right place!My mother’s were delicious mounds of walnuts, cranberries, and semisweet morsels with moist centers and crisp edges.We’ve put together a list of handy tips that will give you more control over your baking, and greater satisfaction with the results.However, there’s more than meets the eye when these ingredients blend magically to become gooey, delicious treats.With the following handy hints, you’ll be baking the chocolate chip cookies of your dreams!Alternatively, you can avoid the fickle yellow sticks altogether and opt for shortening.This vegetable fat has a higher melting point, so it doesn’t make cookies spread out like butter can.If you have room, place the whole cookie sheet full of portioned dough into the fridge for another 10 minutes or so.That means it has a tendency to start to melt while we are still making the dough, and before it hits the oven.By keeping it chilled, melting is delayed until the cookie begins to rise and bake, resulting in a thicker final product.And don’t forget to read our review of Silpats and other top-quality silicone pan liners here.Placing dough on warm sheets will cause the butter to begin to melt.If you skip this step, the cookies will start to spread before they have a chance to rise, and you’ll have pancakes again.Recipes are based on how ingredients react chemically, rising and binding to create delicious food.Even a slight shortage in the amount of flour will throw off the rising portion of the recipe, producing a flatter result.If you’re looking to produce a dairy-free or gluten-free batch of biscuits for the first time, set Grandma’s recipe aside and rely on a tested and trusted resource to get the proportions just right.Little bubbles of carbon dioxide are released, making air pockets that create a light texture.If yours is past its expiration date, it might not react chemically with your ingredients, leaving you with a flat, dense result.Conventional wisdom suggests that if you don’t use the optional cup, you should add an extra tablespoon of flour to firm up your dough.Conventional wisdom suggests that if you don’t use the optional cup, you should add an extra tablespoon of flour to firm up your dough.Damp flour also adds moisture to a recipe, unbalancing that carefully calculated ratio of ingredients.Remember to read recipes all the way through before you begin to bake, and measure ingredients carefully.And don’t forget to browse through all of our cookie recipes and check out more baking guides! .

What's Wrong With My Cookies? A Troubleshooting Guide

What's Wrong With My Cookies? A Troubleshooting Guide

What's Wrong With My Cookies? A Troubleshooting Guide

But every now and then, our chatty nature gets the best of us and when we pull out a batch of cookies from the oven, we can't help but gasp.We intentionally mucked up the cookie dough in a few different ways to see what would happen and if we could fix the problem.We used a simple, standard Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, which calls for:.In this case you can counter the imbalance straight away, adding more wet ingredients or more flour until you get the consistency you want.Dough with too much flour was like glue—we were able to roll into a ball and it stayed in exactly the same shape throughout its time in the oven.As much as it pained us to move forward, we went ahead and baked the "problem cookies" to show what they look like when they come out of the oven.If your cookies are flat, brown, crispy, and possibly even a bit lacy around the edges, that means you need to add flour to your dough for the next batch.Our cookies were brittle and greasy and cooked much faster than the other dough balls on the sheet.Adding too soft or slightly melted butter to the dough can also result in flat cookies.Avoid the microwave completely if possible by cutting butter into small pieces and letting them sit for 30 minutes.It doesn't take much—in this case, my mom and I added just 3/4 cup extra flour to the dough.To make the cookies more tender, Betty Crocker suggests adding 2 to 4 tablespoons of softened butter, or 1/4 cup of sugar, to the batter.The results looked presentable, though the chocolate chips were lost a bit in the dough.We added more flour, more sugar, chopped nuts, and baked the dough in a greased 9"x12" pan.I personally like them the way my mom makes them, chewy in the middle and crispy on the edges, a little flat but not brittle.In that case, adding a sprinkling of extra flour and chilling the dough can help achieve that goal.If you like chewy cookies, chill the dough before forming into balls and baking, them remove from oven just before they look completely done.One person I know swears by sticking the entire baking sheet into the freezer immediately to stop any baking from residual pan heat, but you can also just transfer them to a wire rack to start cooling right away.As a bonus, I did a little research to find out just what role each ingredient plays in chocolate chip cookies, so you can adjust your recipe however you feel like experimenting.Most recipes assume you'll use all-purpose, but if you want a lighter, crumblier cookie texture, choose one with a lower protein content such as cake-and-pastry flour.Baking soda helps cookies spread outward and upward while cooking.Many bakers underestimate the amount of time required to blend the two ingredients thoroughly, as this is rarely specified in a recipe, and it has a significant effect on the end result.Another vegan substitute is to mix 1 tablespoon of ground flaxseed in 3 tbsp water and soak for five minutes until it thickens. .

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