How To Bake Good Scones
Scones

How To Bake Good Scones

  • January 12, 2022

They’re somehow sturdier and heartier than biscuits, but without being overly dry or crumbly.You can dress them up by adding nuts, citrus zest, or chocolate chips.Or simply serve them plain alongside some local jam or homemade flavored butter.As the steam escapes, it bursts up and creates that beautiful tall, flaky texture.It also adds a lovely tang to create more depth of flavor.My absolute favorite tool for making biscuits or scone dough quickly and easily by hand (so I don’t have to lug out my food processor) is this OXO bladed pastry blender.If at any point you notice the butter become greasy and melty, pop the dough into the freezer for 10 to 15 minutes before proceeding.You can also pop the tray of shaped unbaked scones in the fridge or freezer while the oven preheats to ensure the butter remains nice and cold.How to Make Tall, Flaky Scones BONUS tip: We’re stealing a trick from croissant baking that I use in my Best Ever Pie Crust recipe!A little bit of lamination gets the scones to shoot up sky high with tons of flaky layers.This will also help you to gently ‘knead’ the dough so it comes together into a more cohesive disk without overmixing it.I actually demonstrated this during a live Zoom class exclusively for HTH Members earlier this year.But you can add in about 3/4 cup of dried fruit, chocolate chips, nuts, etc., to the dough.Use a spatula to gently fold in 1 1/2 cups blueberries to the scone dough as a final step before shaping.Citrus zest, to taste, if desired Directions: Whisk all glaze ingredients together until thick but still pourable.Easy recipe with make-ahead instructions and tons of baking tips below.Coarse sugar Directions Adjust the oven rack to the center position and preheat to 400°F.In a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, 1 egg, and vanilla extract.*Optional Step: See Recipe Notes for lamination instructions.Cut each round into 8 wedges and place on your prepared baking pans.MAKE AHEAD At this point the unbaked scones can be refrigerated overnight, or sealed and frozen for up to 1 month.In a small bowl, combine the remaining egg with 1 teaspoon water.Every month you can join the challenge by baking the recipe and snapping a photo for a chance to win prizes!This recipe was originally published in May 2017 and was recently updated in 2021 with new photos and more baking tips! .

The BEST Scone Recipe

The BEST Scone Recipe

The BEST Scone Recipe

Learn how to make delicious, soft, light, and tender scones with this easy tutorial.But the truth is that when made correctly, scones are actually super soft, light, and can melt in your mouth!So today I’m bringing it back to the basics and showing you exactly how to make homemade scones.Too much flour can lead to a crumbly dough and scones that don’t taste as good.Too much flour can lead to a crumbly dough and scones that don’t taste as good.A little cream brushed on top of the scones before they go into the oven creates a beautiful slightly crisp and lightly browned exterior too.When it comes to soft scones that don’t dry out, heavy whipping cream is the best option.A little cream brushed on top of the scones before they go into the oven creates a beautiful slightly crisp and lightly browned exterior too.Next, whisk together the heavy whipping cream, egg, and vanilla extract until well combined.Then, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, work it into a ball, flatten it into a disc 7 inches in diameter, and cut it into 8 equal-sized pieces.Once it’s nice and cold, brush the tops of the scones with a little heavy whipping cream.Add 1 and 1/2 teaspoons of ground cinnamon and 2/3 cup of raisins Lemon Poppy Seed: Add the zest of 1 medium lemon and 1/2 tablespoon of poppy seeds You can also find my chocolate chip scone recipe here and my apple cinnamon scones here. .

How to make the perfect scone

How to make the perfect scone

How to make the perfect scone

The honest scone has no sugary icing or exotically-perfumed ganache to hide behind – it stands or falls on its absolute freshness, which is why it's impossible (and please correct me if I'm wrong) to purchase a good example on the high street.Twee tearooms are similarly unreliable, because scones should be enjoyed straight from the oven, with only the briefest of pauses for the requisite toppings (at the risk of losing a few of you right here, I'll admit now that I'm a clotted cream denier) – making them ideal fodder for home bakers.The problem is that sub-standard scones can be disappointing indeed – dense little curling stones barely worth the effort of buttering – yet without our support, the brave wee thing is in danger of extinction.Every scone maker aspires to the towering triumphs of the soufflé – the miraculous transformation of lumpen flour and fat into a billowing cloud of fluffy dough – but all too often ends up with stubbornly flat biscuits instead.Bicarb, I learn, is an alkali that reacts with acids (buttermilk is my habitual choice, but cream of tartar or lemon juice can also be used) to create the carbon dioxide that causes the mixture to rise.Finally, there's Marcus Wareing's take on the perfect scone, which over-eggs the pudding with both self-raising flour and extra baking powder (a method also favoured by Gary Rhodes, I notice: these cheffy types never know when to leave well alone).The Sophie Grigson buttermilk scones have an almost grainy appearance, while Marcus's and Rachel's are a deep golden colour, presumably thanks to the eggs in their recipes.Towering magnificently above the rest (by a good couple of millimetres) are the scones of the fragrant Rachel Allen (bicarb and cream of tartar).The results are more impressive than the initial batch, but not as tall as Rachel's, which suggests to me it's the combination of raising agents (bicarb and cream of tartar) and extra-fine flour which has made the difference here.Having enjoyed many a decent fruited number in their various tearooms over the years, I can't pass over the National Trust's Traditional Teatime Recipes book, although I'm surprised to find it calling for lard as well as butter.They're lovely though – as the author, Jane Pettigrew points out, "despite containing no eggs, this recipes makes light, well-risen scones": crumbly, feather-light and definitely nudging Rachel and Marcus in the height stakes.Delia, meanwhile, thinks the real test of a scone-maker's mettle comes at the very last minute: "don't roll [the dough] any thinner than 2.5cm" she cautions, "and push, don't twist the cutter.".Marcus Wareing and Rachel Allen's recipes are both rich and eggy, with a moist, golden crumb – delicious, but to my mind, more like a cake than a scone.The lard versions, which contain no sugar, are pleasingly puritanical, as befits the scone's Scottish heritage, crumbly – and utterly delicious once they've been rewarded with a dollop of raspberry jam.The secret, I think, whatever your preference, is not to skimp on the raising agent (self-raising flour alone doesn't seem to do the job), to work the mixture as little as possible – and make sure you don't roll it too thinly before cutting. .

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

I added two tsp of cinnamon and I put the egg in the measuring cup then added 1/2 milk and 1/2 half and half cream and the dough consistency was perfect.If people had dough that was too wet, they really need to try putting the egg in the measuring cup first, then adding the milk.This was the first time I ever made scones, but not my boyfriend- he gave me a really good tip: see, I was confused and thought that I was supposed to add the entire egg/ milk mixture to the dough, but instead, he said to just add enough of it so that the dough be moistened (We only used about half of the egg/ milk mixture).I know this is what the recipe says to do, but what i THOUGHT the directions said was to add the whole mixture and keep mixing until it was moistened.I also recommend using the food processor to combine the flour mixture and butter.The texture was much better when I added a little more flour to roll out, then kneaded a couple times and patted down into a circle and made scone wedges.I've added fresh chopped cranberries and orange zest/juice.Orange glaze.Rating: 5 stars A+++ We made orange cranberry scones and they turned out delicious.I've made them twice in the last twenty four hours, and got rave reviews each time.Also, I sprinkled brown sugar on top, but these are all personal preferences.Rating: 5 stars I come from England, and haven't eaten scones since moving to America.I have looked for a while for a recipe and this one sounded the closest to how I remember my mother making them.If they are made correctly, they are certain to stick to the roof of your mouth as you eat them so it's always a good idea to have a drink with them - preferably, steaming cup of English tea!Rating: 5 stars I needed an English dish to take to a multi-cultural food tasting party at my daughter's school.I served them with strawberry jelly and hot tea, and they were a hit!! .

Scones

Scones

Scones

In winter I love the smell of buttery, light, cooked perfect scones baking in the oven.The best thing is getting the freshly baked scones out of the oven, breaking them open and smelling the delicious aroma.When I was a kid my Nan and I used to spend a lot of time in the kitchen cooking together, working our way through cookbooks and old recipes.By this time Nan and I had baked soufflés together, made mousse and cheesecake, so I didn’t think something as simple as a scone would fail.Making scones kind of feels like cheating as they taste so good but are really easy to bake.Use ice cold water out of the fridge or cooler in the scone mixture They don’t like to be touched by hands.I use an egg flip to move the scones into a floured baking tray.Add the flour and butter to a food processor and process until the mixture looks like sand.Tip the dough onto a floured bench and push gently into a square shape about an inch thick.Well, I hope you enjoy success with my recipe and tips on cooking perfect scones, just remember they like to be made by mixing cool and no hands! .

How to Make Better Scones

How to Make Better Scones

How to Make Better Scones

And although the food processor can help keep the temperature down, it's easy to over-mix, so use a pastry instead, Youngman suggests."You can use that time to preheat the oven so the kitchen doesn't heat up while you make the dough.The final chill relaxes the gluten which yields a tender texture.If the fruit is in one big chunk, however, thaw, rinse and drain it as well as you can.Don't overbake them, and remember they are meant for clotted cream, butter, and jam! .

Easy Scones Recipe [Light & Fluffy]

Easy Scones Recipe [Light & Fluffy]

Easy Scones Recipe [Light & Fluffy]

» You might also like this Classic Crepe Recipe or this Bagel & Lox Sharing Board.Some of our other favorite flavors are cranberry orange, lemon, and these apple scones with maple cinnamon glaze.But to be honest, nothing beats just plain English scones with jam and clotted cream.Slathering on a homemade jam and clotted cream takes this scrumptious baked treat up another notch.The delicious flavor and fluffy interior is perfect for afternoon tea.These measurements are given only in weight because it’s very important to use the exact amount of the ingredient that’s called for.Start by combining the flour, baking powder and salt together in a mixing bowl.You can also combine these ingredients in a food processor, if you’d rather not mess with the pastry cutter.Using a machine to combine the rest of the ingredients will surely overmix it and result in dense scones.Press or roll the dough to about 3 cm thick and use a floured cutter to cut circles.Place the scones onto a baking sheet lined with parchment or silicone mat.Make sure the oven is properly and fully preheated before putting them in.Bake the scones for 10-12 minutes, until about tripled in height, and golden brown on the tops and bottoms.To make flaky, fluffy scones, you need to start with cold butter.You can add an extra tsp to the mixture, if it’s a bit older, to ensure the scones will rise.When you turn it out on the countertop, don’t add extra flour to it, unless it’s too actually too wet.If you add more flour to take away the tackiness of the dough, it will affect the final product.The good news is that even when the scones don’t rise, they are still really tasty and are usually still fluffy inside.Fresh fruit, with the exception of berries, usually contains too much water, which will change the consistency of the scones.Mixing in chocolate chunks also adds a sweet twist to this classic.Make sure they’ve cooled completely before sealing them into a freezer bag with all the air squeezed out.Sift the flour, baking powder and salt through a sieve into a large mixing bowl.Using a pastry cutter, incorporate the butter into the flour until it is in small crumbs.Pour into the dry ingredients and mix gently, just until a soft dough forms.Press or roll out the dough into a circle on a lightly floured cutting board.Notes This recipe is written in the metric system because this is how we were taught in England to make the scones.Using weight measurements is the best way to ensure you get the exact amount of the ingredient you need for perfect scones.If your scones don’t rise properly, there are a number of reasons this may have occurred. .

The BEST Scones Recipe {Any Flavor!} +VIDEO

The BEST Scones Recipe {Any Flavor!} +VIDEO

The BEST Scones Recipe {Any Flavor!} +VIDEO

Scones make for a delicious pastry perfect for breakfast or brunch!You can serve them with fruit salad, healthy egg muffins, and some homemade lemonade.A scone differs from a biscuit in the amount of sugar and fat as well as uses both sweet and savory ingredients to flavor.A more traditional scone is fairly plain and often topped with butter, jam, or clotted cream.The colder the butter the more steam can be released creating flakier air pockets inside a crisp crust.The more you mix and knead the dough, the more the gluten is activated causing a denser chewier scone instead of it being flaky and airy.Instead of cutting the dough into 8 wedges, as the directions state, use a cookie cutter to stamp out your shapes.For a crispier crust be sure there is space between the individual pieces on the baking sheet.If you cover the scones as they cool the moisture will create a softer crust.The basic dough recipe for these scones is simple, and easily adaptable to different flavor combinations.Dough: You can shape the scones and store them in the fridge overnight to be baked in the morning.Once the scones are solid transfer them to a freezer safe storage container.I recommend only freezing them for 3-4 weeks otherwise the effectiveness of the leavening agents start to decrease and the scones will not be as light and airy as you want.You can store them in an airtight container on the counter for 2-3 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months. .

Easy Homemade Scones (Any Flavor)

Easy Homemade Scones (Any Flavor)

Easy Homemade Scones (Any Flavor)

Start with our soft and flaky homemade Scones recipe and add your favorite mix-ins.Then drizzle a simple powdered sugar glaze on top and bask in pastry scone heaven.The smell of fresh scones always made it easy to get out of bed, and I knew I’d have to get to the kitchen quick or my siblings would devour them first!Just like with a good pie crust or biscuit recipe, if you over-handle the dough then the baked product will be tougher, instead of tender and flakey.To avoid flat scones: Place the dough in the refrigerator after step 6.In a separate bowl whisk together yogurt, cream, egg, and vanilla until well blended.Combine wet and dry mixture and craisins, and fold the ingredients in until it starts to come together in large clumps.Gently knead mixture by hand (in the mixing bowl) just a few times until it comes together in a ball.Cut into 8 wedges then transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet.Cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes before drizzling the glaze on top.To make ahead: The scones dough can be made one day in advance.Once frozen, store scones in a freezer safe container for 2-3 months.Allow scones to thaw completely on the countertop and warm for 20 seconds in the microwave before eating.Then drizzle a simple powdered sugar glaze on top and bask in pastry scone heaven.Print Pin Rate Author Lauren Allen Course Breakfast, Side Dish Cuisine American Servings 8 Calories 361 Prep 15 mins Cook 15 mins Total 30 mins Add to Meal Plan Go to Collections Ingredients US Customary Metric 1x 2x 3x For the Scones: ▢ 2 cups all-purpose flour.▢ 1-2 Tablespoons milk Instructions Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.In a separate bowl whisk together yogurt, cream, egg, and vanilla until well blended.Add to the dry mixture along with craisins (or other add-ins) and use a rubber spatula to fold the ingredients in until it starts to come together in large clumps.Gently knead mixture by hand (in the mixing bowl) just a few times until it comes together in a ball.Dust a clean surface with a little flour and drop dough on top.Cut into 8 wedges then transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet.Cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes before drizzling the glaze on top.For the Glaze: Add powdered sugar to a mixing bowl with 1 Tbsp milk and stir until smooth.Make ahead Instructions: The scones dough can be made one day in advance.Once frozen, store scones in a freezer safe container for 2-3 months.Updated March 2020 with process photos and flavor adaption tips. .

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