How To Bake Scones In A Gas Oven
Scones

How To Bake Scones In A Gas Oven

  • June 23, 2022

We’re going to tell you which steps are crucial (don’t skip the rubbing in of the butter) and which can be flexed!These scones are round, almost cylinder like shaped, often with a curved on the outside.They don’t have to be round anymore and come in various shapes, sizes and even flavors.Compare a ‘typical’ British scones to an American one and you’ll likely notice a difference in size, sweetness and absence (or presence) of fillings.But, biscuits tend to be savoury, even salty, whereas most scones are more neutral, or slightly sweet.Classic British scones in the UK, eaten with clotted cream & jam.You can tear a chunk from a baguette, but it won’t break or fall apart easily.The reason these breads behave this way is because of the formation of a gluten network.These breads are kneaded extensively, or left to rest for long periods of time.When making scones on the other hand, you do NOT want this gluten network to form.The absence of a gluten network helps keep a scone flaky.Another important factor contributing to the flakiness is the presence of pockets of fat.Fat prevents proteins, but also starches in the flour from coming together and forming a structure.In the oven, these leavening agents will react and form carbon dioxide, a gas.To create a nice, light texture, it’s also important to add the right amount of liquid.You can use baking soda if you’ve added an acidic ingredient to the dough (e.g. buttermilk, vinegar, lemon juice).Savory scones, these do start to show overlaps with the American biscuit!Step one of most scones recipes tends to be to: rub in the butter (or other type of solid fat) into the flour.Most commonly you’ll find recipes using butter, margarine, lard, or shortening.They can all make a good scone, with slight differences in texture.The liquid oil won’t be able to make those larger pockets of fat.As we’ll learn in the next step, overmixing only becomes a problem once water joins the party.As such, you can rub in the fat by hand, but you might just as well use a food processor, or a stand mixer for instance.For a gluten network to form, you need water, time and kneading.Water ensures the protein molecules can move freely, to find each other and interact.When kneading a dough, you’re actively helping the gluten network to form.It’s why any scone recipe will caution you against extensive kneading or mixing once you’ve added the water.As soon as the dough starts to come together, stop the mixer and continue by hand.Keep in mind though that some fillings help improve the flakiness of a scone, whereas other can do the exact opposite!Generally speaking, fat-based fillings will be easy to incorporate without ruining the texture.Water based, very liquid fillings on the other hand, should be handled with care.Therefore, cheese will serve a similar function as the butter in your scone, it will help keep it crumbly and light.The more you knead and break it, the more moisture will be released and the more the scone will be affected.A good fruit we found is cranberries, they barely release any moisture when they’re uncooked!If you do want to add more moist fruit, reduce the amount of milk you’re adding.If there are still large clumps of flour or pockets with a lot of water, it won’t hold together in those areas.If you double the amount of butter in our recipe, they’ll turn out more like cookies (we tested it for you).Keep in mind that after rubbing in the fat into the flour, it should give a crumbly texture.Using milk instead of water can give a slightly browner scone and a little (but not much) extra flavor.If your scones barely rise in the oven, reconsider the amount of water you’ve added.If you’re using baking soda, take care that you’ve added at least one sour ingredient (e.g.

buttermilk).By now, it’s hopefully clear that you do have a lot of creative freedoms when making scones.This ensures an even distribution of the fat and the creation of those buttery pockets.Top left : substitutes milk for water, a little bland in color, but identical taste-wise.Bottom two : contain twice the amount of butter, turned out more like cookies than scones! .

Convection oven vs. traditional oven

Convection oven vs. traditional oven

Convection oven vs. traditional oven

I understand that the convection oven distributes the heat more evenly, and there is a cost benefit because it cooks faster saving some electricity.Sales people at appliance stores will go on and on about the time and energy-saving advantages of a convection oven, and how you can cook a gazillion cookies at once, and how could you possibly live without one...The blowing hot air in a convection oven caused these muffins to slant sideways.Early convection ovens (and even some today) have been known to make wetter batters or doughs literally be blown sideways by the fan as they're rising.We've heard tales of cookies being blown off their baking pans onto the oven window; a shot I'd dearly love to reproduce, but so far haven't managed.My advice when shopping is to have a recipe you make a lot in mind, and while you're at the store, fantasy-bake it using the controls of any model you're considering.Ironically, for all the "even-baking" hoopla, I find most convection ovens have a hot spot toward the front; the air blowing across hits the door and bounces back, and often the food at the front of any baking sheet is done significantly before the rest.Make sure whatever oven you do buy (especially if you only have room for one) is capable of baking without the fan coming on.Convection bake (lower fan speed, so you don't end up blowing cookies across the pan, or putting tilted "hats" on your cupcakes).Convection bake at a very low temperature is nice for dehydrating; you can get beautiful oven-dried/roasted tomatoes with it.Convection roast is nice for any kind of chicken or chunk of meat where you like crispy outsides, and I've been known to go there for airier pizza crusts.At higher temperatures with water in the bottom, it's a good setting for baking artisan breads: quick oven spring and usually a better crust.When I buy ovens for the King Arthur test kitchen, I get double-wall units — convection on top and regular on the bottom — which give us a lot of options.(Keep in mind there's a lot of room for variations and personal choice here, given the many different combinations you'll find in oven designs). .

Stovetop Scones Recipe

Stovetop Scones Recipe

Stovetop Scones Recipe

1) In a medium bowl, whisk the sour cream and a few gratings of zest from the orange and the lemon until smooth. .

Baking in gas oven does not brown the top

Baking in gas oven does not brown the top

Baking in gas oven does not brown the top

You could start by checking with an oven thermometer on various shelves while baking and see if you're seeing vastly different temperatures at the top and bottom.But if you don't need that hot heat in an initial burst, a lower temperature may allow the top of the food to dry out over a longer bake and then begin to brown.Basically: browning reactions don't start to happen quickly until the outer layer of the food dries out (and can thus increase in temperature above boiling). .

Easy Scone Recipe

Easy Scone Recipe

Easy Scone Recipe

Simple to share, and super easy to rustle up for any celebration, even one fit for a Queen this Jubilee. .

You Can Make Scones Without an Oven

You Can Make Scones Without an Oven

You Can Make Scones Without an Oven

You’ll need a cast-iron or heavy-bottomed frying pan and a pot of good jam to serve them with.Use your fingers to rub 4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter (cut into small chunks) into the flour mixture. .

Baking Temperature: When you're hot. . .or not!

Baking Temperature: When you're hot. . .or not!

Baking Temperature: When you're hot. . .or not!

So, when a friend asked me to bake scones for her daughter’s wedding shower, I agreed.The scones came out of the freezer, were set onto a parchment lined cookie sheet, placed into the oven.I made a simple adjustment to the settings and the next two batches of scones baked up perfectly.Look carefully–the scone on the right baked at the unexpectedly lower oven temperature.It was very tasty, but it didn’t have the same light texture or appearance as the scone on the left.A faulty igniter (gas oven) is the culprit, and repair is scheduled next week. .

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