How To Eat American Scones
Scones

How To Eat American Scones

  • January 10, 2022

A quintessential part of Afternoon tea, a proper British scone is round, tall, and has an extremely light texture with a crust like exterior.Found in teashops around the country scones are considered a teatime ritual in England, and a key component of a cream tea.They taste even better served with copious amounts of clotted cream, consumed on a sunny day while relaxing in the garden.A staple of most coffee shops, the American scone is frequently large and triangular shaped with a rustic, craggy exterior.The American 1 ½ cups, chilled BUTTER The British ½ cup, chilled 1 tbsp baking powder LEAVENER 2 tbsp baking powder The more the merrier ADDED FRUIT a handful of sultanas or raisins Egg wash and coarse sugar TOPPING Light milk and egg wash. .

What's the Difference Between American Scones & British Scones

What's the Difference Between American Scones & British Scones

What's the Difference Between American Scones & British Scones

Not long ago, I saw an American baker post a photo of her scones in a British group, where she was quickly eviscerated.Many do, of course, but we've encountered enough who don't that we thought this post might be useful – or at the very least, save someone a bit of social media embarrassment.Like peanut butter, the idea of sweet, pumpkin-flavoured food is just not something that appeals to the majority of Brits.American scones are usually designed to be eaten alone, though a light glaze or frosting drizzle on top is very common.British scones have a much plainer flavour profile, and are designed to be topped with things like clotted cream, butter, lemon curd, and/or preserves.It's not really a good or bad thing, as British scones pile on plenty of sugar (in the form of preserves/jam) and butter or clotted cream as toppings.Measure out flour and baking powder, then add in the butter and mix until it looks like breadcrumbs.Beat the eggs together and add in milk until you have a total of about 10 ounces.Gradually add the remainder into the flour mixture, kneading it as you go.Once mixed, put the dough on a lightly floured surface.and use your hand or a rolling pin to flatten it down to about half to three-quarters of an inch high.Knead the excess dough as little as possible to recombine it and roll it out again to cut more.Place the scones on a baking tray, and brush the tops with your extra egg and milk mixture.Bake for 10-15 minutes until they rise nicely and achieve your desired shade of golden brown.Preheat oven to 375F (190C) Mix flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.Beat cream and egg together, then slowly mix them into the dry ingredients.If you think the eggs vs. no-eggs debate is bad, just try asking a British person whether you should spread the cream first or the jam first.

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British desserts, explained for Americans confused by the Great

British desserts, explained for Americans confused by the Great

British desserts, explained for Americans confused by the Great

As Americans wake up to the wonders of The Great British Baking Show, they're also realizing something else: Nobody on this side of the Atlantic Ocean really knows what any of these desserts are.The differences between what British people and Americans mean by "pudding" and "biscuit" might sound silly.Nancy Mitford, in a famous essay comparing the speech of upper-class Britons with everyone else, categorized "pudding" as used by the elite and "sweet" as used by the proletariat.).And just to make things a bit more confusing, some dishes are referred to as "puddings" that are sometimes baked but formerly were boiled or steamed.The best example is sticky toffee pudding, a date cake with caramel sauce that's traditionally steamed but is now often baked.American biscuits are small, fluffy quick breads, leavened with baking powder or buttermilk and served with butter and jam or gravy.If you frequently read British recipes or cookbooks, you're constantly coming up against references to aubergines (eggplants), mangetouts (snow peas), courgettes (zucchini), coriander (cilantro), sultanas (golden raisins), and rocket (arugula).The British terms are usually French, while the American versions are influenced by Italy: zucchini and arugula came to the US with Italian immigrants, who brought their words for it; in the UK, they were more likely to come across the channel.Nearly all classic British desserts (Serious Eats has a great guide to them) are rarely eaten, if at all, in the United States.Eton mess is a mixture of meringue, strawberries, and cream named after one of the UK's most exclusive schools.Banoffee pie is so sweet that it's sometimes blamed on America, but the mixture of bananas, caramel, and whipped cream in a graham cracker crust is in fact British through and through.American and British desserts are so different because sugar became more cheaply available after the US won its independence in the late 18th century.So if The Great British Baking Show makes you crave a Victoria sponge or a banoffee pie, you may be out of luck. .

The Difference Between British and American Scones: Test Cook

The Difference Between British and American Scones: Test Cook

The Difference Between British and American Scones: Test Cook

Andrea Geary lived in Scotland for eight years, so it made sense that she was tasked to develop the Cook's Illustrated recipe for British-style scones.My first job in restaurants was making baked goods for a cafe; one of the cook’s partners there used to drop her off at work and he used to take a scone every time.Do Brits mix dried fruits, nuts, and chocolates in the batter as Americans tend to?It’s interesting to compare a British scone to a Martha Stewart or Ina Garten one, which are really good but on the opposite end of the spectrum as far as add-ins and butter go.One of my friends in Scotland who reads Cook’s Illustrated saw this recipe and laughed because he has this thing about currants in his scone.I made a recipe that I used to make when I worked at a posh hotel on the Isle of Skye called Kinloch Lodge that’s run by Lord and Lady MacDonald; she’s a very well-known food writer in the UK.That was a really interesting recipe in that it had 3 pounds of self-raising flour and only 2 ounces of fat, which was vegetable oil.And then I made one by Paul Hollywood who presents a TV show called “The Great British Bake Off” and one by the National Trust, which runs all the historic sites in Britain—the castles and everything.What I took away from the Kinloch Lodge one was that using vegetable oil means you don’t run the risk of having those chunks of butter in the batter like you do in an American scone.I consulted YouTube and watched videos of people’s grandmothers making scones, and they started with soft fat.In this recipe we add more than the usual amount of leavening (2 teaspoons of baking powder per cup of flour) to make the lightest, fluffiest scones, and add currants for tiny bursts of fruit flavor. .

American Classics: Fried Scones

American Classics: Fried Scones

American Classics: Fried Scones

Once you get past the name, fried scones are an easy breakfast or brunchtime sweet that can be whipped up in less time than their doughnut brethren.While yeast raised doughnuts generally call for two rises, fried scones only need one and still turn out plump, puffy, and pleasing.Popular among Utah Mormons, it's thought that they might have been brought back by missionaries who worked in Navajo communities because of their similarities to Native American fry bread. .

Breakfast Biscuits (Savoury American Scones) – Feast Glorious Feast

Breakfast Biscuits (Savoury American Scones) – Feast Glorious Feast

Breakfast Biscuits (Savoury American Scones) – Feast Glorious Feast

They’re effectively savoury buttermilk scones that are flaky rather than crumbly & make an excellent side or breakfast.Ideally served warm and smothered with butter, I can’t stop eating them!The phrase “biscuits and gravy” is met with very different responses in the UK and US!Visions of digestive biscuits with beef gravy aren’t that appealing.McDonalds even replace their McMuffins with Biscuit sandwiches in many of their Southern US restaurants.They are especially common with Southern Fried Chicken and other sides like Macaroni Cheese and Green Bean Casserole.Breakfast Biscuits are incredible as an additional side to any of my Americana Feasts.Adding either Sausage Gravy or Creamed Mushrooms will also make for heck of a Brunch Feast.Plus remember to check out my recipe index to create your own awesome Feast!If you only have unsalted butter, it is fine to use but you may wish to add a little extra in the way of sea salt flakes.As I think you are more likely to buy it than make it, I have written the recipe based on the thicker commercial buttermilk.If you don’t have buttermilk, you can alternatively use plain yoghurt or milk with a little lemon juice mixed in.There are not actually many ways that I tend to vary this recipe other than in respect of the size and shape.You could go to the next level and add cheese or even pieces of cooked bacon.Something hard is ideal for the dough but you could use a softer, more flavoursome spread for melting and brushing on after baking.You don’t want a lot of gluten in the Biscuits so the texture shouldn’t be overly affected.Dairy Free: Simply follow the instructions that I’ve given above to make the recipe suitable for vegans.Please note that this recipe may contain other allergens not referred to above and any variations suggested have not been tested unless otherwise stated.A rolling pin would be helpful as would a sharp knife or some cookie cutters.You could use anything from a cast iron skillet (quite traditional) to an enamel tin, ceramic dish or regular baking tray.Simple but it does make sprinkling flour for kneading and rolling that bit more even and under control.You could spoon the butter over the top of the Biscuits but the pastry brush does make things a little more refined.There are no hard and fast rules so many items can be sensibly substituted to achieve the same results.Once you make the dough and cut out the Biscuits you can either bake them straight away or freeze them.I wouldn’t keep them in the fridge as the baking powder will sit and continue to react with the buttermilk.Any leftovers can be eaten over the next few days or simply frozen to eat at a later date.Stale biscuits could also be blitzed up and used like breadcrumbs, fried to make croutons for a salad or even used in a bread and butter type pudding.They won’t be quite as fluffy as the actual Biscuits but it still tastes great and waste is very very bad!You can cut the dough rectangle into 3 pieces and stack them rather than folding to make the layers.Sharp straight edges allow the biscuits to rise high and even.It can be easy to end up with a doughy interior, especially if you like your baked goods on the lighter side of brown like me.Don’t forget to let me know in the comments if you try making this recipe – I want to know what you think and if you made any substitutions, how did it turn out?Hit one of the share buttons to save this page to your Pinterest boards so you can come back and find it at anytime!Make sure you SUBSCRIBE to my newsletter and avoid missing out on any of my newest and bonus content.Plus you’ll receive a copy of my FREE 7 Day International Meal Plan!You can learn more in my guest host post and see the recipes that I chose to create an Easy Everyday Feast! .

All-American Chocolate Chip Scones

All-American Chocolate Chip Scones

All-American Chocolate Chip Scones

American scones must have, at some point, descended from the British version, which food historians tell us date back to the 17th or 18th century and were originally a relatively savory cake, made with oats, and cooked on the hearth.Today, when Britons make scones, they are minimally sweet, cylindrically shaped, studded with currants, and served with clotted cream and jam.It’s a mystery how American bakers took this baked item and transformed it into the glorified cookie form in which it exists today.In our endless pursuit of dessert options for all meals, this recipe is a key ingredient (pun intended) for a breakfast sugar high.Biscuits and scones rely partly on steam from the chunks of melting butter to help them rise, so you want to be sure you leave some big hunks in there to (ironically) make the final baked good lighter.We’ve included instructions for a version of this recipe that uses a food processor, rather than a pastry cutter.While this version is certainly expedient, it would make professional bakers past turn over in their graves as it has a very high risk of over-cutting the butter and over-mixing in the liquid.A third option, not listed here because it’s so darn tedious, is to grate frozen butter and stir that into the dry ingredients.Whisk together the flour, baking powder, ground cinnamon, and salt in a large bowl.Cut the butter into small pieces (roughly 1/4-inch cubes) and toss into the bowl with dry ingredients.Pour the flour, baking powder, ground cinnamon, and salt into the bowl of a food processor and pulse to combine.Pour the wet ingredients into the food processor and pulse a few times until the dough forms a ball.Affiliate Disclosure: As Amazon Associates, we earn a small commission from qualifying purchases when you click on links embedded in this post. .

The Difference Between Biscuits and Scones, Plus 6 Healthy

The Difference Between Biscuits and Scones, Plus 6 Healthy

The Difference Between Biscuits and Scones, Plus 6 Healthy

Growing up in the South, I was served biscuits at breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner.Some are skinny and tall, others flat and wide, and some come nestled together like Parker House rolls in cast-iron pans.Served with butter or jam, smothered with gravy or topped with ham and cheese or a piece of fried chicken, biscuits are as Southern as bourbon, collards and mac and cheese.Even though my mom has lived in the South for nearly 20 years, she's never gotten quite accustomed to biscuits.And since she is the baker in the house, I became accustomed to and developed a love for scones too.Both scones and biscuits are usually made with some combination of flour, baking powder or baking soda (or a combination of both), salt, sugar, milk or buttermilk, eggs (if you're making scones) and a fat (butter, Crisco, lard).The dry ingredients are mixed together, the fat is "cut in" with a pastry cutter, two knives or your fingers, and the liquid is added until the dough just comes together.The dough is gently kneaded very briefly then cut into circles or triangles and baked.I followed the same general recipe when developing these healthy scones in the EatingWell Test Kitchen, replacing some of the all-purpose flour with whole-wheat and using just enough butter to give them great flavor.Then I mixed in sweet or savory ingredients to make each variation special.Whisk 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour, baking powder, sugar (1 tablespoon for savory, ¼ cup for sweet) and salt in a large bowl.Using a pastry blender or your fingertips, cut or rub butter into the dry ingredients.Whisk milk (or buttermilk) and egg in a medium bowl; stir into the dry ingredients until just combined.Cut each circle into 6 wedges and transfer to the prepared baking sheet.Whisk 3/4 cup lightly packed confectioners' sugar and 2 Tbsp.lemon juice (or milk) in a small bowl until smooth. .

8 Amazing Facts You Didn't Know About Scones

8 Amazing Facts You Didn't Know About Scones

8 Amazing Facts You Didn't Know About Scones

No matter how you like to eat a scone, your trusty afternoon tea treat has a bit of a secret history buried within the clotted cream and jam centre that's really worth bringing to the surface...A scone is closer to a pastry than it is to bread mainly because it doesn't include any yeast and has almost identical ingredients to a shortcrust with different fat to flour ratios.After countless articles, surveys, online arguments and polls - even the Queen has weighing in on the debate!According to the snacking routines of Anna, the Duchess of Bedford, Afternoon Tea commenced at exactly 4:00 pm.Scones originate from the Scottish 'bannock', which is derived from the Gaelic for cake and made using a thin, round, flat combination of oats and wheat flour. .

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