How To Eat Butter Scones
Scones

How To Eat Butter Scones

  • June 30, 2022

After all, where there’s bread – be it sliced white, airy artisanal sourdough or hot-from-the-tandoor naan – surely butter should be in close proximity.Some grate their butter, while a few are fans of the food hack that suggests cutting fridge-solid slabs with a cheese slicer.There are, as always, a few exceptions to that rule, namely if the bread in question has been pulled from the oven seconds before or if gently swirling it in a pool of olive oil feels more fitting – when presented with an Italian-inspired grazing platter, mezze table or tapas-style menu, for example.Those with more austere eating habits suggest that adorning a slice of golden, egg-rich brioche with yet more butter could be considered gilding the lily.Here’s our much-deliberated status on the matter: butter remains a constant until the additional ingredient in the potential triumvirate rivals it in terms of texture and richness.Fiercely contested doesn't even come close to describing the difference of opinion over how to serve a scone, with the Cornish adamant that jam then cream is the only way to go (which seems to be Queen Elizabeth II's preference, too, according to her former personal chef).Whichever way you prefer your scones, what we want to highlight is that the presence of cream in both methods makes the need for butter pretty much obsolete (or certainly excessive).A layer of butter insulates the bread from the rest of the ingredients and helps to prevent a soggy sandwich.A butter base coat acts as a magical primer, softening the bread and adding just the right amount of moisture.Perhaps most important of all, this thin yet all-important layer functions as an insulating barrier between the bread and the other ingredients, helping to guard against one of the greatest culinary tragedies of all: the soggy sandwich. .

Asian Pear Scones with Miso Honey Butter — Eat Cho Food

Asian Pear Scones with Miso Honey Butter — Eat Cho Food

Asian Pear Scones with Miso Honey Butter — Eat Cho Food

I personally love it because now I wake up each morning (with the exception of today) feeling like the most productive superhero.Before the time change I was stuck in a bad rut of waking up way too late and always having to rush to work like a crazy person.Now it’s sunny at 7am, and as a Leo that is literally powered by the sun, waking up is so much easier and somewhat enjoyable.The only bummer is that it’s pitch black at like 4pm now, which makes working until 6 pretty dreadful... if I’m at home I don’t mind it though!I’ve read some controversial writing from people who believe scones should be dry or drier to their biscuit counterparts.Other conventional pears are just too mushy for me... can’t get behind it unless it’s poached and served on ice cream or something to that nature.It hits all of the salty, sweet, funky, and umami notes that I’m constantly craving.

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How Do the British Really Eat Scones?

How Do the British Really Eat Scones?

How Do the British Really Eat Scones?

Traditional Devon cream tea with fruit scones and strawberry jam | © Colin Cadle Photography / Alamy Stock Photo.Freshly baked fruit scones | © Alena Kravchenko / Alamy Stock Photo.You could be forgiven for not thinking twice about this tasty treat, but actually, the humble scone is the cause of one of the most heated debates in the British Isles.Now, this might sound silly to some, but which topping is applied first depends on which of two neighbouring counties you are from: Devon or Cornwall.And while there isn’t a clear correlation between the pronunciation and where the speaker is from, generally, someone from the south of England is more likely to say ‘scone’ to rhyme with ‘phone’, while someone from the Midlands or the north of England is more likely to pronounce ‘scone’ to rhyme with ‘gone’.Either way, these scones are a delicious and much-loved British treat; just check who’s watching before you add your toppings. .

10 Different Ways to Eat a Scone – Tea Blog

Scones are a very traditional teatime treat, so much so that some people are quite adamant about the proper way to eat them.#2 — Fresh from the oven (allow to cool enough so you don’t burn your fingers when you pick them up), split in half, spread with butter/margarine, then put back together with a big spoonful of lemon curd, marmalade, apple butter, or whatever, in-between.#4 — Baked into the round, biscuit shape, then cut into quarters and drizzled with maple syrup (or honey, if you prefer).#7 — Risk a few singed fingertips by grabbing scones right off the baking sheet fresh out of the oven.#8 — Put a few in a baggie and carry them around in your purse, backpack, hip pocket, etc., and munch on one wherever you are (such as waiting in line at the DMV).#9 — Bake and then freeze a few dozen to be “zapped!” in the microwave and slathered with your favorite topping as the urge strikes.A nice pot of Devonshire, Barry’s, PG Tips, or Typhoo will truly make your enjoyment complete. .

Foolproof English Scones ~Sweet & Savory

Foolproof English Scones ~Sweet & Savory

Foolproof English Scones ~Sweet & Savory

Tip This mixing method ensures light and tender texture, because fat from the butter coats the flour granules therefore limiting gluten formation.Now, it’s time to add wet ingredients into the flour mixture and mix it until combined. .

Brown butter scones

Brown butter scones

Brown butter scones

Dew, you got me through college, through grad school, and far too many years of being on-call 24/7 in an IT job at a corporate law firm whose lawyers worked around the clock (and therefore, so did I).Dew, with your 46 grams of unadulterated high fructose corn syrup (that’s 6+ teaspoons to us Imperial measurement system, grams-have-no-context Americans).After I switched to a career with regular hours — but alas, a sedentary desk job — an ice cold can of Mt.I no longer needed the burst of energy; I just wanted the comfort of a long-time fizzy friend, and an excuse to stretch the legs and take the scenic route down to the vending machines.My soda ban coincided roughly with a job change that featured a Starbucks within walking distance.66 grams of simple carbohydrates coursing through my bloodstream with yet another four hours of sitting on my ass still ahead of me.So — skipping past the shock of reading the drink’s nutrition profile for the first time — I’m back to where I started two years ago, breaking yet another unhealthy habit.(I’ll pause respectfully while you shake your head at the painfully obvious “duh” factor at work here.).I won’t be so bold as Dr. Oz as to endorse it as a healthy substitute, but what seems to be true is that it doesn’t carry the heavy glycemic load of cane, beet or corn sugars.Finding and using healthier alternatives to refined and processed ingredients isn’t always easy, and I’m grateful to cooks like Kim Boyce, who have made it their mission to introduce healthier whole foods — in Kim’s case, grains — into our favorite recipes.When thumbing through this book the other day, I just knew that her Brown Butter Scones would make the weekend menu. .

Lemon Raspberry Scones with Brown Butter Glaze

Lemon Raspberry Scones with Brown Butter Glaze

Lemon Raspberry Scones with Brown Butter Glaze

Well, unlike my last recipe, which was decidedly un-springlike, these lemon raspberry scones scream springtime to me.I would really love to try Meyer lemons, as everybody seems to be raving about them these days, but I have never seen them at the store.These scones were a little on the denser side, but they were made with whole wheat flour and Greek yogurt, rather than all-purpose flour and heavy cream, so that’s kind of to be expected. .

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Imagine wandering into the kitchen on a chilly weekend morning, craving your favorite cream scones.You pull out your go-to recipe, gather your flour and sugar, then open the fridge only to gasp audibly.Your scone dreams aren’t crushed; you don’t need to abandon your beloved recipe.Swap butter and milk for heavy cream in any basic scone recipe, so you can always bake these classic treats — no matter what kind of dairy is in your fridge.If you’re a person who faithfully plans baking ahead and always has the necessary ingredients on hand, this substitution is still worth learning.Best for: Enjoying as is or with a cup of coffee or tea; can also be dressed up as shortcake and served alongside fruit.Cream scones' delicate texture is also just right for highlighting flavors like cardamom, cinnamon, espresso powder, and more.Reason to love them: They’re quick and easy to make and don’t require working the fat into the dry ingredients.With our easy substitution, you’ll be able to convert back and forth based on what you’re looking for (or what’s in your fridge at the moment).If your recipe doesn’t call for a full cup of heavy cream, scale down the amount of butter and milk that’s used accordingly.This ratio also works if you’d like to go in the other direction: You can replace the butter and milk in your recipe with heavy cream, basically using the same approach.Working in the cold butter in this fashion will give you a layered, slightly flaky scone.(Note: Let the butter and milk cool slightly if your recipe calls for adding eggs to the liquid.We put the substitution ratio to the test by comparing our classic Cream Tea Scones (left) with a batch converted to butter and milk (right).If you add a full cup of cream, your dough will be quite sticky, especially if the recipe also calls for eggs.Any leftover cream can be brushed on top of the dough to help your scones turn beautifully golden brown as they bake.If you keep in mind the tips and tricks we’ve taught you here, you’ll be able to transform any scone recipe to get exactly the results you’re looking for.We hope you'll whip up a batch and try a new flavor combination, or perhaps convert your favorite cream scones recipe to butter and milk to see which version you like best. .

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