How To Make Round Scones
Scones

How To Make Round Scones

  • July 5, 2022

Sure, we all take up the baking gauntlet at some point, challenging ourselves to make laminated dough for croissants, or to shape a perfect fougasse.But often – well, there's simply no time for fussing or fancying; we just need to get something yummy in and out of the oven FAST.When you're looking for a breakfast treat that's not nearly as time-consuming as those tricky croissants, yet is still a bit more special than muffins, I recommend scones – highly.I bake after-Mass treats for my fellow parishioners at Our Lady of Hope in West Barnstable, MA one Sunday a month.And there's absolutely no question, among the doughnuts, coffee cake, muffins, quick breads, and other breakfast pastries, which treat disappears first.Truth be told, classic British scones are drier than ours; crumbly, rather than moist.In fact, the original Scottish scone was nothing more than oat or barley flour and water, dry-fried on a griddle.But here in America, land of plenty, we like our scones packed with butter and milk and eggs and sugar.You can roll or pat your sweetened, butter- and egg-enriched dough into a big circle and carefully cut rounds.Here's how I figure it: Add up the volume of flour + any solid add-ins (e.g., chocolate chips, nuts, raisins, diced fruit, coarsely grated cheese, etc.).That equals 4 cups of "solid stuff" (as opposed to milk, eggs, baking powder, etc.).If they're too large or too small, make a note to yourself and divide the dough differently next time.I'm making two types of scone here: Fresh Apple Cinnamon, sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar; and Chocolate Chip, topped with coarse white sparkling sugar.If the pick sports a thin sheen of raw batter/dough, let them bake a bit longer.But they're moist and tender, and the same thing that might make them problematic to cut into perfectly shaped wedges – lots of chips, fruit, nuts, etc.Once the dough rounds are frozen solid, wrap them securely in plastic, and store them in the freezer for up to a couple of months. .

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

We’re going to tell you which steps are crucial (don’t skip the rubbing in of the butter) and which can be flexed!These scones are round, almost cylinder like shaped, often with a curved on the outside.They don’t have to be round anymore and come in various shapes, sizes and even flavors.Compare a ‘typical’ British scones to an American one and you’ll likely notice a difference in size, sweetness and absence (or presence) of fillings.But, biscuits tend to be savoury, even salty, whereas most scones are more neutral, or slightly sweet.Classic British scones in the UK, eaten with clotted cream & jam.You can tear a chunk from a baguette, but it won’t break or fall apart easily.The reason these breads behave this way is because of the formation of a gluten network.These breads are kneaded extensively, or left to rest for long periods of time.When making scones on the other hand, you do NOT want this gluten network to form.The absence of a gluten network helps keep a scone flaky.Another important factor contributing to the flakiness is the presence of pockets of fat.Fat prevents proteins, but also starches in the flour from coming together and forming a structure.In the oven, these leavening agents will react and form carbon dioxide, a gas.To create a nice, light texture, it’s also important to add the right amount of liquid.You can use baking soda if you’ve added an acidic ingredient to the dough (e.g. buttermilk, vinegar, lemon juice).Savory scones, these do start to show overlaps with the American biscuit!Step one of most scones recipes tends to be to: rub in the butter (or other type of solid fat) into the flour.Most commonly you’ll find recipes using butter, margarine, lard, or shortening.They can all make a good scone, with slight differences in texture.The liquid oil won’t be able to make those larger pockets of fat.As we’ll learn in the next step, overmixing only becomes a problem once water joins the party.As such, you can rub in the fat by hand, but you might just as well use a food processor, or a stand mixer for instance.For a gluten network to form, you need water, time and kneading.Water ensures the protein molecules can move freely, to find each other and interact.When kneading a dough, you’re actively helping the gluten network to form.It’s why any scone recipe will caution you against extensive kneading or mixing once you’ve added the water.As soon as the dough starts to come together, stop the mixer and continue by hand.Keep in mind though that some fillings help improve the flakiness of a scone, whereas other can do the exact opposite!Generally speaking, fat-based fillings will be easy to incorporate without ruining the texture.Water based, very liquid fillings on the other hand, should be handled with care.Therefore, cheese will serve a similar function as the butter in your scone, it will help keep it crumbly and light.The more you knead and break it, the more moisture will be released and the more the scone will be affected.A good fruit we found is cranberries, they barely release any moisture when they’re uncooked!If you do want to add more moist fruit, reduce the amount of milk you’re adding.If there are still large clumps of flour or pockets with a lot of water, it won’t hold together in those areas.If you double the amount of butter in our recipe, they’ll turn out more like cookies (we tested it for you).Keep in mind that after rubbing in the fat into the flour, it should give a crumbly texture.Using milk instead of water can give a slightly browner scone and a little (but not much) extra flavor.If your scones barely rise in the oven, reconsider the amount of water you’ve added.If you’re using baking soda, take care that you’ve added at least one sour ingredient (e.g.

buttermilk).By now, it’s hopefully clear that you do have a lot of creative freedoms when making scones.This ensures an even distribution of the fat and the creation of those buttery pockets.Top left : substitutes milk for water, a little bland in color, but identical taste-wise.Bottom two : contain twice the amount of butter, turned out more like cookies than scones! .

Authentic British Scones • Curious Cuisiniere

Authentic British Scones • Curious Cuisiniere

Authentic British Scones • Curious Cuisiniere

An authentic British Scone is a perfect accompaniment to your warming cup of tea, particularly if you have some clotted cream and jam to serve it with!Or do you think of the sugar-dusted pastries in the Starbucks display case that you might be tempted to grab to go along with your morning coffee?British scones are small nibbles that are fairly plain on their own but are classically eaten with jam and clotted cream, making for a real treat.The basic ingredients for biscuits and scones really are the same: flour, leavening, a little salt, some fat, milk, and maybe a little sugar.The process too is similar: cut the fat into the dry ingredients, add the liquid, roll, and bake.British scones are denser, slightly drier, and more crumbly than biscuits.Because of the extra butter, biscuits should be light and fluffy with tender layers.Scone dough is made from simple ingredients that you probably keep your pantry stocked with.Doing this creates a fine, sandy consistency that helps give the scones their classic texture.Whether you call it a biscuit or a scone, these tasty treats are great for breakfast or for an afternoon nibble.Clotted cream, at room temerature (to serve) Instructions Preheat your oven to 425F.In a medium bowl, place the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and butter.Twisting the cookie cutter will impact the amount of rise you get on your scones.).Remove the baked scones from the oven and let them cool for 30 minutes (if you can resist).Alternately, freeze the baked scones and reheat in a low oven for 5-10 minutes after thawing on the counter.Her love for cultural cuisines was instilled early by her French Canadian Grandmother. .

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

I barely knead the dough at all, and just roller it out into the 1/2-inch thick round once the ingredients are well mixed.I don't have a stand mixer, and have added the butter two different ways: cutting the butter into small pieces and adding the pieces a little at a time, stirring them in, which resulted in a crustier, bumpier scone; and I have also softened the butter in the microwave, then mixed it into a soft paste and put it in the freezer for a few minutes to "re-cool". .

Classic Scones Recipe

Classic Scones Recipe

Classic Scones Recipe

Serve the baked scones warm, with the best jam you can lay your hands on, and a dollop of crème fraîche, mascarpone or, if you can find it, clotted cream. .

The BEST Scone Recipe

The BEST Scone Recipe

The BEST Scone Recipe

Learn how to make delicious, soft, light, and tender scones with this easy tutorial.But the truth is that when made correctly, scones are actually super soft, light, and can melt in your mouth!So today I’m bringing it back to the basics and showing you exactly how to make homemade scones.Too much flour can lead to a crumbly dough and scones that don’t taste as good.Too much flour can lead to a crumbly dough and scones that don’t taste as good.A little cream brushed on top of the scones before they go into the oven creates a beautiful slightly crisp and lightly browned exterior too.When it comes to soft scones that don’t dry out, heavy whipping cream is the best option.A little cream brushed on top of the scones before they go into the oven creates a beautiful slightly crisp and lightly browned exterior too.Next, whisk together the heavy whipping cream, egg, and vanilla extract until well combined.Then, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, work it into a ball, flatten it into a disc 7 inches in diameter, and cut it into 8 equal-sized pieces.Once it’s nice and cold, brush the tops of the scones with a little heavy whipping cream.Add 1 and 1/2 teaspoons of ground cinnamon and 2/3 cup of raisins Lemon Poppy Seed: Add the zest of 1 medium lemon and 1/2 tablespoon of poppy seeds You can also find my chocolate chip scone recipe here and my apple cinnamon scones here. .

Quick, Easy, British Scone Recipe

Quick, Easy, British Scone Recipe

Quick, Easy, British Scone Recipe

The classic scone in this recipe has been mixed, baked, and eaten on these islands for centuries and is as popular today as they ever were.Making both sweet or savory homemade scones for afternoon tea (or anytime you fancy a treat) is both quick and simple. .

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

You can dress them up by adding nuts, citrus zest, or chocolate chips.Or simply serve them plain alongside some local jam or homemade flavored butter.How to Make Scones Overview: How to Make the BEST Scone Recipe Combine the dry ingredients: in a large bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda.Whisk the wet ingredients: in a separate large mixing bowl, combine the buttermilk, egg, and vanilla extract.If you’re adding in any flavorings such as chocolate chips or dried fruit, add them in now.Cut each round into 8 wedges and place on prepared baking pans.Brush egg wash over the scones and bake until golden brown.As the steam escapes, it bursts up and creates that beautiful tall, flaky, fluffy texture.My absolute favorite tool for making biscuits or scone dough quickly and easily by hand (so I don’t have to lug out my food processor) is this OXO bladed pastry blender.If at any point you notice the butter become greasy and melty, pop the dough into the freezer for 10 to 15 minutes before proceeding.You can also pop the baking sheet of shaped unbaked scones in the fridge or freezer while the oven preheats to ensure the butter remains nice and cold.How to Make Tall, Flaky Scones BONUS tip: We’re stealing a trick from croissant baking that I use in my Best Ever Pie Crust recipe!A little bit of lamination gets the scones to shoot up sky high with tons of flaky layers.Check out my How to Make Tall Scones & Biscuits article for more tips.I actually demonstrated this during a live Zoom class exclusively for HTH Students earlier this year.But you can add in about 3/4 cup of dried fruit, chocolate chips, nuts, etc., to the dough.Use a spatula to gently fold in 1 1/2 cups blueberries to the scone dough as a final step before shaping.Citrus zest, to taste, if desired Directions: Whisk all glaze ingredients together until thick but still pourable.Easy scone recipe that is ultra buttery, flaky, and flavorful.Coarse sugar Directions Adjust the oven rack to the center position and preheat to 400°F.In a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, 1 egg, and vanilla extract.Cut each round into 8 wedges and place on your prepared baking pans.MAKE AHEAD At this point the unbaked scones can be refrigerated overnight, or sealed and frozen for up to 1 month.In a small bowl, combine the remaining egg with 1 teaspoon water.Recipe Video Recipe Notes OPTIONAL STEP : Here's how to laminate your scone dough: Turn the craggly mass of scone dough out onto your work surface.Every month you can join the challenge by baking the recipe and snapping a photo for a chance to win prizes!This recipe was originally published in May 2017 and was recently updated in 2021 with new photos and more baking tips! .

Easy English Scones Recipe with Jam & Clotted Cream

Easy English Scones Recipe with Jam & Clotted Cream

Easy English Scones Recipe with Jam & Clotted Cream

A traditional tasty English teatime treat that’s so easy to make at home.These easy British Scones remind me of one my favorite vacation destinations: London.Even if you’re a student and don’t have much money (like we did on our first trip, where we stayed in a hotel room without windows to save money) you can experience Michelin starred cuisine (choose the lunch menu), eat the finest sandwiches from Harrods (go there just before they close), and taste traditional Afternoon Tea (get the cream tea instead of the whole Afternoon Tea).Scones with clotted cream and jam are definitely one of my favorite treats and they’re so easy to make at home!Like my Easy Lemon Raspberry Cake or my Banana Muffins with Cinnamon Streusel, British-style scones are a great addition to a brunch or special-occasion breakfast like Mother’s day, Easter or Christmas.English scones contain more leavening agent than you would normally use for this amount of flour but you want them to rise high in a short time.This English Scones Recipe is really easy and fast to make, using ingredients you probably have at home anyway.Scones are traditionally served in the afternoon at teatime with a cup of tea but they’re also perfect for brunch!▢ 1 egg , beaten Cook Mode Prevent your screen from going dark Instructions Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C).In a large bowl mix flour with the salt, baking powder, and sugar.Brush the tops with egg wash, then carefully place onto the hot baking tray.Eat just warm or cold on the day of baking generously topped with jam and clotted cream. .

Making Scones: Tips and Troubleshooting Problems

Making Scones: Tips and Troubleshooting Problems

Making Scones: Tips and Troubleshooting Problems

Like all baked goods, a lot can go wrong at each step, throwing your recipe into a tailspin.Amy Lawrence, an accomplished afternoon tea cookbook author and the founder of ​An Afternoon to Remember shares her tips on how to make scones that are flavorful, moist and beautiful.If you're adding fruit, chocolate or other sweet ingredients to a basic scone recipe, use less sugar.If you're making scones with ingredients like canned pumpkin or mashed banana, use less buttermilk than you would normally use.Just press it into the mixture, cutting the butter as you go and wiping the cutter clean of dough with your hand as needed.Add just enough buttermilk or milk (preferably low-fat) to make the dough stick together.If you're using frozen fruit, and add it at the last minute (just before you cut the scones) to prevent its juices from melting before it gets into the heat of the oven.Once your dough is crumbly, you can freeze it in a sealed plastic bag until you're almost ready to bake it.This is a good way to prepare scones for busy holidays and large events.For pink scones (for events like Valentine's Day or a birthday party), puree raspberries and use them as a portion of your liquid ingredients.Move a chunk of dough from the mixing bowl to a floured cutting board.If the dough is too crumbly when you place it on the cutting board, add slightly more buttermilk.If the dough is too sticky when you put it on the cutting board, add more flour.Optional: If you have remaining flour dregs, you can add a very small amount of buttermilk to them and use them as additional dough. .

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