How To Make Scones Without Milk
Scones

How To Make Scones Without Milk

  • January 19, 2022

Last month Tony and I had a fun trip to Maine to learn about wild blueberries.There were many fabulous takeaways, but the one thing I could not get out of my head were the Panera Wild Blueberry Scones.Rich, full fat coconut milk swaps in for the cream to make wonderfully simple, delicious wild blueberry scones.This post is sponsored by So Delicious Dairy Free, but the wild blueberry scones, photos and opinions are all mine.In this picture, I used 1/2 cup powdered sugar, 1 tablespoon So Delicious unsweetened dairy-free coconut milk beverage, and 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract.Thank to Jeanette for providing feedback on this recipe via Instagram: “They were yummy this morning esp with added almond extract ?”.Thanks to Ashley for providing feedback on this recipe via Facebook: “I’ve made this many times they’re so good! .

Plain Scone Recipe with step-by-step photos

Plain Scone Recipe with step-by-step photos

Plain Scone Recipe with step-by-step photos

These plain scones are light and fluffy, and go perfectly with jam and cream for a gorgeous afternoon tea.When I was in London a few years ago, I was reminded of my fond affection for Devonshire Tea, which is essentially a plain scone served with jam and cream.There is something just so comforting about sitting down to a hot cup of tea (with milk and sugar for me), with a small selection of sweet cakes to see you through the afternoon.The only drawback for me with the recipe was the use of cream of tartar, an ingredient which is hard (sometimes impossible) to find in Zurich, but which I know is widely available in countries like the UK, US and Australia.To make plain scones, you start by rubbing cold butter into the dry ingredients until the mixture looks crumbly and resembles wet sand.I also use lard or vegetable shortening to make the scones extra soft.For this task, I like to use my stand mixer with the flat paddle attachment, but you could of course simply use your fingertips.Milk is added to the dry ingredients to bring everything together into a soft dough.At this stage, you should handle the dough as little as possible to ensure that the scones turn out light and fluffy.Plain Scones ★★★★★ 4.9 from 14 reviews Author: Thanh | Eat, Little Bird.These plain scones are light and fluffy, and go perfectly with jam and cream for a gorgeous afternoon tea.heaped teaspoons baking powder 50 g ( 1/2 stick) unsalted butter, cold and cut into cubes (see Kitchen Notes).ml (1 cup) double cream or heavy whipping cream 1 – 2 heaped teaspoons of caster sugar or vanilla sugar Instructions For the Scones Preheat the oven to 220°C (430°F) (without fan).Place a baking tray in the middle shelf of the oven to warm up while you are making the scones.Place the flour, salt, sugar and baking powder into the bowl of a KitchenAid or stand mixer.Add the butter and lard (or vegetable shortening), and briefly mix with the flat paddle attachment until the mixture resembles damp sand.Alternatively, you can do this by hand by simply rubbing the fats into the flour with your fingertips.Place the dough onto a floured work surface and pat it into a rectangle or circle shape about 3 cm (1 inch) high.I use a 6 cm (2.5 inch) crinkle-edged cookie cutter to make fairly small scones.Serve the scones with some Chantilly Cream (recipe below) and strawberry jam.You can use frozen butter in this recipe and simply grate it into the dry ingredients.I like to freeze 2 or 4 scones together in a small zip-lock freezer bag for easy handling.To bake, simply proceed with the remaining instructions above using the frozen scones (there is no need to defrost them first), but they will require an extra 5-10 minutes in the oven (depending on size).If you have a convection oven with a fan, please consult the manufacturer’s handbook on how to adjust the temperature and baking time accordingly.To convert from cups to grams, and vice-versa, please see this handy Conversion Chart for Basic Ingredients. .

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

I added two tsp of cinnamon and I put the egg in the measuring cup then added 1/2 milk and 1/2 half and half cream and the dough consistency was perfect.If people had dough that was too wet, they really need to try putting the egg in the measuring cup first, then adding the milk.This was the first time I ever made scones, but not my boyfriend- he gave me a really good tip: see, I was confused and thought that I was supposed to add the entire egg/ milk mixture to the dough, but instead, he said to just add enough of it so that the dough be moistened (We only used about half of the egg/ milk mixture).I know this is what the recipe says to do, but what i THOUGHT the directions said was to add the whole mixture and keep mixing until it was moistened.I also recommend using the food processor to combine the flour mixture and butter.The texture was much better when I added a little more flour to roll out, then kneaded a couple times and patted down into a circle and made scone wedges.Rating: 5 stars A+++ We made orange cranberry scones and they turned out delicious.I've made them twice in the last twenty four hours, and got rave reviews each time.Also, I sprinkled brown sugar on top, but these are all personal preferences.Rating: 5 stars I come from England, and haven't eaten scones since moving to America.I have looked for a while for a recipe and this one sounded the closest to how I remember my mother making them.If they are made correctly, they are certain to stick to the roof of your mouth as you eat them so it's always a good idea to have a drink with them - preferably, steaming cup of English tea!I cut the butter down to 1/2 c. and froze it first then grated it into the flour mixture.Rating: 5 stars I needed an English dish to take to a multi-cultural food tasting party at my daughter's school.I served them with strawberry jelly and hot tea, and they were a hit!! .

Dairy free scones

Dairy free scones

Dairy free scones

When I started out testing my vegan scones recipe, I was determined that they taste just as good as the dairy version, and I'm pleased to say that these hit the spot in every way.If you scroll on down to the FAQ towards the bottom of this post, you can read about some of my favourite vegan butter brands for baking.First, you'll combine flour, sugar, salt and bicarbonate of soda, then rub in vegan butter.Once you have a crumb, you'll add your favourite vegan milk alternative and mix it together with a butter knife to give the perfect scone dough.From there, it's just a case of gently pressing the dough into a rectangle, cutting out rounds, brushing with a little more plant milk and baking for 12 minutes puffed and golden.200 ml ( ¾ cup + 1 tbsp ) unsweetened plant milk plus a little to brush the tops.Gather the offcuts, working the dough as little as possible, and pat to flatten so that you can cut out the remaining rounds.Transfer the rounds to a greased baking tray and brush the tops with plant milk.Once you've tried this recipe and found out how easy these dairy free scones are to make, you'll be tempted to whip up a batch again and again.With just a few simple ingredients and not much effort, you can have beautifully fresh scones with the added bonus of them being totally vegan.Everything you need to make these dairy free scones should be easy to find in the average kitchen.You will need scales and measuring spoons, plus a mixing bowl to combine the ingredients, and a baking sheet to cook them on.I recommend a 5cm cookie cutter to produce your rounds, but you could use anything you have to hand, such as a drinking glass.Alternatively, you can use your hands to shape the dough into a large round about 4cm (1.5 inch) thick and cut into 6-8 wedges like pizza slices.Head down to the recipe card below, where you'll find the full list of suggested equipment.Also be mindful of what you serve your dairy free scones with, if you add butter or cream made from cow's milk, they'll obviously no longer be dairy-free or vegan!In the images featured in this post, I used lightly whipped Elmlea Double Plant Cream Alternative.When baking with gluten-free flour I recommend using a good quality brand that will likely be a blend of things like rice and oat flour, mixed with a binding agent like xanthan gum to help with the texture and of course a raising agent.Scones in themselves are not so unhealthy compared to other much sweeter bakes like cookies and cakes - they're really more of a quick bread.Of course, if you serve with your scones with as lashings of jam and vegan cream, this will up the sugar, fat and calories, but that doesn't mean they can't be enjoyed as an occasional treat as part of a healthy, balanced diet.At the bottom of the recipe card below, you'll see an estimate of the nutritional values for a plain scone.Make sure to check all the ingredients are in good condition, and that the scones are made safely and hygienically.Each scone contains an estimated 3g of sugar, which you could leave out of the recipe if you wish without compromising the flavour.As long as a child is over 6 months old and has comfortably progressed to eating solid foods then these scones should be ok for them.Remember jam is usually very high in sugar so leave their scone plain, or spread a little dairy-free butter on, if you like.You might like to spread your scones with vegan butter and lovely strawberry or raspberry jam.Try adding 50g (1.75 oz) of raisins or chopped glacé cherries, to the mix after you've created the crumb with the butter and flour and before you add the milk.I estimate you'd need to wash about 100g (3.5oz) of fresh blueberries and pat dry on a clean tea towel or some kitchen paper.Personally, I prefer scones as fresh as possible and so they're usually devoured by my family on the day of baking.You can also wrap and freeze any extra scones on the day you bake them, and they'll keep in the freezer for up to a month.No, other than when brought out for serving, these dairy free scones need to be stored in an airtight container somewhere cool.As with most home baking, and particularly scones, I would suggest making them on the day if you can as they are best served as fresh as possible.There's no need to keep scones in the fridge, simply pop any leftovers into a container and keep them in a cool cupboard.Don't forget to label the container with the date and what's inside so you can make sure to use them up within a month of freezing.Defrost in the fridge overnight in their container, then bring to room temperature before serving, or warm in the oven, if you like.Once the vegan butter and flour have been rubbed together, you simply need to cut through the plant milk using a table knife, just until the dough has come together, so need to get the mixer out for this speedy bake.If you find it difficult to rub the butter and flour mix by hand, you could use a food processor on pulse mode to create your crumb.It's important to not over-mix the dough so make sure to stop as soon as your flour, vegan butter and raising agents have been blitzed to an even crumb - it should take a matter of seconds.Once you have a crumb, tip the mixture into a bowl and lightly cut the milk through with a kitchen knife until the dough has come together.This helps to not over mix the dough and keeps some of the air in that you introduced when rubbing the butter into the flour.This helps to not over mix the dough and keeps some of the air in that you introduced when rubbing the butter into the flour.DON'T USE A ROLLING PIN : As soon as your dough has come together, press it gently into a rectangle about 2cm (¾ inch) thick.Any final off-cuts can be gently gathered together to form one last wonky scone - my personal favourite!Any final off-cuts can be gently gathered together to form one last wonky scone - my personal favourite!They will rise and expand as they bake, and the distinct scone crack will form around the edge.Make sure to set a timer so you remember to check on the scones, and take them out when they are risen and golden.The dough for these dairy free scones can be a little sticky so don't worry if it's a bit wet when you first bring it together.Next time, carefully measure out the milk into a jug before adding it to the rest of the ingredients.As soon as the plant milk mixes with the bicarb it will start to react and we want as much of that reaction as possible to happen in the oven.It's also important to preheat the oven as scones bake quickly and need to be at a constant temperature.You can also turn these into savoury scones by leaving out the sugar, and spreading with vegan cream cheese to serve.200 ml ( ¾ cup + 1 tbsp ) unsweetened plant milk plus a little to brush the tops Equipment Weighing scales.Add the cold, cubed vegan butter and use your hands to rub it until you have an even crumb.Gather the offcuts, working the dough as little as possible, and pat to flatten so that you can cut out the remaining rounds.Transfer the rounds to a greased baking tray and brush the tops with plant milk.Vegan cottage pie This vegan cottage pie boasts a richly flavourful mince and veg filling with a deliciously smooth gravy, all topped with creamy, peppery mash. .

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

We’ll dig into which of those steps are actually important (and which aren’t) to give you that light, flaky scone instead of a brick.It should fall apart easily when you pull a part off, but it shouldn’t crumble apart in your hands.You might be surprised to learn, that it isn’t that different from the American biscuit, Both are crumbly, light and moist and use very similar preparation techniques.Classic British scones in the UK, eaten with clotted cream & jam.These crucial steps all relate to creating that characteristic crumbly scone.A crumbly scone breaks apart very easily into smaller bite size chunks.You have to tear a part off a baguette, taking a lot more effort than breaking of a piece of scone.The main reason for these differences is the existence or absence of a gluten network.A bread dough is kneaded extensively to organize and align the gluten that are naturally present in wheat flour.Two steps help you prevent extensive gluten network formation:.They align and form this strong network if there’s enough water and if the dough is kneaded extensively.There is another way to help prevent gluten formation, it’s to put barriers in place for the proteins to interact.Rubbing in the butter consistently throughout the flour is essential for making that crumbly scone.At this point you can use an electric mixer without any risk of over mixing (just be careful to not melt the butter).Upon placing the scone dough into the oven these pockets of butter will start to melt.Where the butter used to sit is now an opening, forming a perfect ‘break’ area for when you’re pulling apart a piece of your scone.However, that won’t bring the scone dough together in a coherent mass, this is where the milk comes in.Remember that baking soda only works well if there’s some other form of acid in the recipe.Aside from providing sweetness, the sugar also helps to brown the scone more quickly in the oven.If there are still large clumps of flour or pockets with a lot of water, it won’t hold together in those areas.Apart from that we tested: Mixing everything in in one go; overall scone looked good, top right, but it tasted a little dry and bland.Substituting water for milk; turned out just fine, especially if you will be eating your scone will flavourful toppings.Adding two times the amount of butter, bottom two, these were more cookies than scones!If your scones barely rise in the oven, reconsider the amount of water you’ve added.If you’re using baking soda, take care that you’ve added at least one sour ingredient (e.g. buttermilk).Some fillings even help to create that light and crumbly texture, whereas with others you have to be a bit more careful that they don’t undo all your previous hard work.Therefore, cheese will serve a similar function as the butter in your scone, it will help keep it crumbly and light.To most scone recipes you can add grated cheese without it negatively impacting the texture.A good fruit we found is cranberries, they barely release any moisture when they’re uncooked! .

Buttery Scottish Teatime Scones - vegan recipe

Buttery Scottish Teatime Scones - vegan recipe

Buttery Scottish Teatime Scones - vegan recipe

A vegan recipe for light and fluffy Scottish scones with a good rise.Scones are offered in Scotland as part of a high tea.High tea is an early evening meal, where you're served a selection of small cakes, including scones after your main meal with a pot of tea.Many hotels and pubs offer high teas in Scotland, but you better be prepared to dine early between 4:30pm and 6:00pm.I used my traditional recipe for scones and changed the butter to dairy-free spread, the plain yoghurt to vegan plain yoghurt (I use Alpro) and the milk to almond milk.When you add the wet ingredients, cut it in with a knife, don't use your hands or a spoon.In Cornwell and Devon scones are served with jam and clotted cream (the name of my friend Beth's blog actually Jam and Clotted Cream).They were also said to be named for the In Scotland they were originally made by crofters with oats and buttermilk on a girdle outside on a fire and cut into triangles.They were also said to be named for the Stone of Destiny which stood in Scone, Perth where the Kings of Scotland where crowned.Scones were duly served, she loved them and it soon became a trend that is still popular today.Buttery Scottish Teatime Scones - Vegan Recipe.With Image Without Image Buttery Scottish Teatime Scones Light and fluffy Scottish scones with a good rise made to a vegan recipe.Perfect for a teatime treat with dairy free spread and jam.Sieve the flour into a large bowl, add the dairy free spread and gently rub them together with your finger tips.Whisk the yoghurt and milk together in a jug and then pour the liquid into the dry mix and cut into the mixture with a knife until it starts to come together.Finish bringing the dough together with your hands (don't over do it), then roll out to 3-4 cm thick on a floured surface.Cut into circles with a cookie cutter and place on a baking sheet.Brush with almond milk and bake for 12-15 minutes until well risen and starting to turn golden. .

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Imagine wandering into the kitchen on a chilly weekend morning, craving your favorite cream scones.You pull out your go-to recipe, gather your flour and sugar, then open the fridge only to gasp audibly.Your scone dreams aren’t crushed; you don’t need to abandon your beloved recipe.Swap butter and milk for heavy cream in any basic scone recipe, so you can always bake these classic treats — no matter what kind of dairy is in your fridge.If you’re a person who faithfully plans baking ahead and always has the necessary ingredients on hand, this substitution is still worth learning.Best for: Enjoying as is or with a cup of coffee or tea; can also be dressed up as shortcake and served alongside fruit.Cream scones' delicate texture is also just right for highlighting flavors like cardamom, cinnamon, espresso powder, and more.Reason to love them: They’re quick and easy to make and don’t require working the fat into the dry ingredients.With our easy substitution, you’ll be able to convert back and forth based on what you’re looking for (or what’s in your fridge at the moment).If your recipe doesn’t call for a full cup of heavy cream, scale down the amount of butter and milk that’s used accordingly.This ratio also works if you’d like to go in the other direction: You can replace the butter and milk in your recipe with heavy cream, basically using the same approach.Working in the cold butter in this fashion will give you a layered, slightly flaky scone.(Note: Let the butter and milk cool slightly if your recipe calls for adding eggs to the liquid.We put the substitution ratio to the test by comparing our classic Cream Tea Scones (left) with a batch converted to butter and milk (right).If you add a full cup of cream, your dough will be quite sticky, especially if the recipe also calls for eggs.Any leftover cream can be brushed on top of the dough to help your scones turn beautifully golden brown as they bake.If you keep in mind the tips and tricks we’ve taught you here, you’ll be able to transform any scone recipe to get exactly the results you’re looking for.We hope you'll whip up a batch and try a new flavor combination, or perhaps convert your favorite cream scones recipe to butter and milk to see which version you like best. .

Gluten-Free Blueberry Scones {Dairy-Free Option}

Gluten-Free Blueberry Scones {Dairy-Free Option}

Gluten-Free Blueberry Scones {Dairy-Free Option}

Easy Gluten-Free Blueberry Scones with a sweet and tangy lemon glaze.I am more of a gluten-free biscuit and muffin girl, so when a reader asked me if I had a gluten-free scone recipe, I was up for the challenge.Cut the butter into small pieces and put in the freezer for 10 minutes.In a large bowl add flour, xanthan gum (leave out if your flour already has it), sugar, baking powder, salt, and lemon peel, stir to combine the ingredients.Cut in the really cold butter into the flour with a pastry cutter or fork until it looks like the size of small peas.Add in the buttermilk and the whisked eggs and stir until a soft dough forms.Add one tablespoon of flour to a large piece of parchment paper.Run a sharp knife under warm water and then cut the dough round in half.Carefully place the dough on the parchment lined baking sheet.Add the glaze ingredients to a small bowl and stir together until smooth.Make sure you don’t add any extra xanthan gum to your flour if it already has it in it.You may experience different baking results depending on the gluten-free flour blend you choose.I used Smart Balance buttery spread and almond milk for the dairy-free scones.Some of my favorite dairy-free alternatives that I like to bake with are almond, cashew or coconut milk.Flash freeze the cut scone dough for 30 minutes on a parchment lined baking sheet before placing them in a freezer bag and putting them back into the freezer.Prep Time 10 minutes Total Time 25 minutes Servings 8 scones Calories 391 kcal Author Audrey from Mama Knows Gluten Free Ingredients ▢ ½ cup butter, diced and really cold dairy-free use Smart Balance butter.▢ ¾ cup buttermilk (make buttermilk by adding 1 tablespoon white vinegar to the milk and sit for 2 minutes) dairy-free add ¾ tablespoon white vinegar to almond, cashew or coconut milk.▢ 1 tablespoon water Instructions Pre-heat oven to 425°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.Cut the butter into small pieces and put in the freezer for 10 minutes.If you do not have buttermilk make your own buttermilk by adding 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice to the cup of milk and let stand 5-10 minutes in the refrigerator to keep cold.In a large bowl add flour, xanthan gum (leave out if your flour blend already has it), sugar, baking powder, salt, and lemon peel, stir to combine the ingredients.Cut in the butter into the flour with a pastry cutter or fork until it looks like the size of small peas.Add in the buttermilk and the whisked eggs and stir until a soft dough forms.Add one tablespoon of flour to a large piece of parchment paper.Run a sharp knife under warm water and then cut the dough round in half.Carefully place the dough on the parchment lined baking sheet.Add the glaze ingredients to a small bowl and stir together until smooth.You may experience different baking results depending on the gluten-free flour blend you choose.Make your own buttermilk by adding ¾ teaspoon of white vinegar to the milk and let sit for 2 minutes. .

Scones

Scones

Scones

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder.Using a bowl scraper or a large spoon, stir the dough ingredients until all is moistened and holds together.Carefully pull the wedges away from the center to separate them just a bit; there should be about 1/2" space between them, at their outer edges.For best texture and highest rise, place the pan of scones in the freezer for 30 minutes, uncovered. .

Vegan scones recipe

Vegan scones recipe

Vegan scones recipe

Put them, top side down, onto another baking sheet lined with paper, leaving a 2cm gap between each one. .

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