Scones With Plain Or Self Raising Flour
Scones

Scones With Plain Or Self Raising Flour

  • May 28, 2022

SUBSCRIBE Invalid email Discover the best city breaks, beach holidays, cruises and UK travel spots by signing up We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you've consented to and to improve our understanding of you.Various famous chefs and bakers use different methods to attain tall scones.Add the sugar, eggs and baking powder and use a wooden spoon to turn the mixture gently.Now add half of the milk and keep turning the mixture gently with the spoon to combine.Then add the remaining milk a little at a time and bring everything together to form a very soft, wet dough.Tip the soft dough out onto the work surface and sprinkle the rest of the flour on top.By folding and turning the mixture in this way (called 'chaffing'), you incorporate the last of the flour and add air.READ MORE VE Day baking ideas: Five baking ideas for you to celebrate VE Day Next roll the dough out: sprinkle flour onto the work surface and the top of the dough, then use the rolling pin to roll up from the middle and then down from the middle.Dip the edge of the pastry cutter in flour to make it easier to cut out the scones without them sticking.Don’t twist the cutter – just press firmly, then lift it up and push the dough out.Any leftover dough can be worked and rolled again, but the resulting scones won’t be as fluffy.Leave the scones to cool, then split in half and add butter, jam and clotted cream to serve.Begin by rubbing the butter into the sieved flour quickly, using your fingertips, then stir in the sugar followed by a pinch of salt. .

Plain Scones

Plain Scones

Plain Scones

These Plain Scones are a traditional English treat enjoyed with afternoon tea.They are absolutely delicious topped with jam and clotted cream, although I'll leave it up to you which one goes on first!In this series I will be sharing recipes for basic baked goods, think a classic Victoria sponge cake, a brilliant white bread loaf, and ultimate gooey chocolate brownies!This series is mainly for beginner bakers who want to learn the secrets behind baking, because getting the basics right is the best place to start.The full ingredient quantities are listed in the recipe card at the end of this post.This post is full of helpful tips and commonly asked questions when making scones, so I do recommend reading through it all first.They do not need yeast to rise, and instead rely on baking powder and self raising flour.They can be made plain, or things like dried fruit and chocolate chips can be added.A food processor does come in handy if you don't want to get your hands dirty, or for convenience, but I rarely use one when making these scones.The main things you want to make sure you have are round cutters, as you need to cut out the scones with them.*I earn a small amount of money if you buy the products after clicking on the links.I recommend using 3 teaspoons baking powder for this recipe if you use plain or all purpose flour.Add the cold butter and use your fingertips to rub it into the flour until it is combined and the whole mixture resembles breadcrumbs.Flatten it out onto a floured surface and create a roughly rectangular shape.Place the scones onto a lined baking tray and brush with beaten egg.I find that circular scones rise more evenly, and they feel like the natural shape for afternoon tea (although I am British so I would say that!).A reader told me that their mother puts the cut out rounds of scone dough in the fridge for 30 minutes before baking them, so I had to give this a go.This apperance is created by brushing the unbaked scones with some beaten egg before they go in the oven.Make sure the egg doesn't run down the side of the scones as this can affect the rise.You can gently tap the bottom of the scones and they will sound hollow, similar to how you test if a loaf of bread is cooked.Scones are always better fresh, in fact about 10 minutes after they've come out of the oven is the perfect time to enjoy them.Once they're fully cool, you can store them in an airtight container for 2 days, and you can also freeze them for up to 3 months.Replace the self raising flour with a gluten free self raising flour blend, make sure the baking powder you're using is gluten free, and add ¼ tsp Xanthan gum.If you can't find a gluten free self raising flour blend, you can use a gluten free plain flour blend, but you will need to add an additional ¼ tsp Xanthan gum and 3 tsp gluten free baking powder.Your baking powder and/or your self raising flour is old and out of date, so has lost it's rising power.Scones actually don't rise that much, so the unbaked dough does need to be fairly thick.Plain Scones Perfect fluffy scones, great for afternoon tea with jam and clotted cream 5 from 9 votes Print Pin Prep Time: 25 minutes Cook Time: 12 minutes Total Time: 37 minutes Servings: 8 Author: thebakingexplorer Ingredients For the scones 400 g Self raising flour.Put the self raising flour, baking powder, salt and caster sugar in a large mixing bowl and stir together.(You can make the scones bigger or smaller if you like by using different size cutters.).Put the dough rounds onto a lined baking tray and glaze the top with the beaten egg.Bake for 12-14 minutes until the scones are risen, golden brown and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom.Cool on a rack and then slice or break in half and serve with jam and clotted cream, or any other topping of your choice. .

Easy Scone Recipe

Easy Scone Recipe

Easy Scone Recipe

These little delights are a kind of quickbread (similar to soda bread) so rely on a chemical raising agent, not yeast, and come together extremely quickly.From Mary Berry to the BBC, every scone recipe will vary slightly but the ratios are usually pretty similar and rely on the simple ingredients of plain flour, milk, butter and baking powder.Some people like using buttermilk but, as it is often hard to find, I prefer to simply thin some natural yoghurt with water (in a 50:50 ratio) to use instead of the milk in the recipe below – i.e. use 50ml natural yoghurt mixed with 50ml water.Freeze the cut rounds of scone dough on a lined baking tray.Once frozen, slide the scone dough rounds into a resealable food bag and freeze for up to 3 months.You can also freeze already baked scones in a resealable food bag for up to 1 month.If you’re finding the scone dough is too wet to handle, pop it in the fridge to chill for about 30 to 60 minutes.Do not try to mix more flour into the dough as you’ll throw off the ratios of ingredients in the recipe resulting in dry, dense scones.Only stir the batter together until the liquid is just about incorporated – the chaffing step after mixing is where the dough properly comes together so don’t worry if it looks like a complete mess when you tip it out of the bowl.The twisting effectively seals the cut edges of the circle which means it won’t rise as well.The recipe I’ve written below uses plain flour and includes the addition of baking powder for the ‘rise’.Place the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl.360 g (3 cups) plain flour *, 50 g (1/4 cup) granulated sugar, 3 1/2 tsp baking powder, 1/2 tsp fine table salt, 100 g (7 tbsp) unsalted butter, cold, cubed.Stir together very briefly to form a messy, sticky dough with some floury patches remaining.Tip the contents of the bowl out onto a work surface dusted lightly with flour.You want to work quickly & lightly here – don't overwork the dough or the scones will be tough.Once frozen, slide them off the tray into a sandwich bag and pop back into the freezer for up to 3 months.See the list below with instructions on how to adapt the recipe above to make differently flavour sweet or savoury scones!Add 100g or sultanas or raisins to the bowl just after rubbing the butter into the dry ingredients.If you want to include glacé cherries, the technique is the same as the scones above however, as glacé cherries tend to be quite large, you’ll want to chop them up a bit first until the pieces are roughly the size of a raisin before adding to the bowl!Add 150g frozen blueberries to the bowl just after rubbing the butter into the dry ingredients.Be aware that you will need to work quickly and gently once the frozen blueberries are added as they will start to defrost and can become squishy which can bleed into the dough.You may need to increase the baking time by 5-7 minutes as the blueberries make the dough colder and wetter.Add the freshly grated zest of 1 lemon to the dry ingredients when you’re rubbing the butter in.Glaze the baked, cooled scones with a mixture of lemon juice and icing sugar until thick but pourable.Add 100g dark, milk or white chocolate chips to the dough after you’ve rubbed the butter into the dry ingredients.If you want double chocolate scones, replace 30g of the flour with unsweetened cocoa powder.

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How to make the perfect scone

How to make the perfect scone

How to make the perfect scone

The honest scone has no sugary icing or exotically-perfumed ganache to hide behind – it stands or falls on its absolute freshness, which is why it's impossible (and please correct me if I'm wrong) to purchase a good example on the high street.Twee tearooms are similarly unreliable, because scones should be enjoyed straight from the oven, with only the briefest of pauses for the requisite toppings (at the risk of losing a few of you right here, I'll admit now that I'm a clotted cream denier) – making them ideal fodder for home bakers.The problem is that sub-standard scones can be disappointing indeed – dense little curling stones barely worth the effort of buttering – yet without our support, the brave wee thing is in danger of extinction.Every scone maker aspires to the towering triumphs of the soufflé – the miraculous transformation of lumpen flour and fat into a billowing cloud of fluffy dough – but all too often ends up with stubbornly flat biscuits instead.Bicarb, I learn, is an alkali that reacts with acids (buttermilk is my habitual choice, but cream of tartar or lemon juice can also be used) to create the carbon dioxide that causes the mixture to rise.Finally, there's Marcus Wareing's take on the perfect scone, which over-eggs the pudding with both self-raising flour and extra baking powder (a method also favoured by Gary Rhodes, I notice: these cheffy types never know when to leave well alone).The Sophie Grigson buttermilk scones have an almost grainy appearance, while Marcus's and Rachel's are a deep golden colour, presumably thanks to the eggs in their recipes.Towering magnificently above the rest (by a good couple of millimetres) are the scones of the fragrant Rachel Allen (bicarb and cream of tartar).The results are more impressive than the initial batch, but not as tall as Rachel's, which suggests to me it's the combination of raising agents (bicarb and cream of tartar) and extra-fine flour which has made the difference here.Having enjoyed many a decent fruited number in their various tearooms over the years, I can't pass over the National Trust's Traditional Teatime Recipes book, although I'm surprised to find it calling for lard as well as butter.They're lovely though – as the author, Jane Pettigrew points out, "despite containing no eggs, this recipes makes light, well-risen scones": crumbly, feather-light and definitely nudging Rachel and Marcus in the height stakes.Delia, meanwhile, thinks the real test of a scone-maker's mettle comes at the very last minute: "don't roll [the dough] any thinner than 2.5cm" she cautions, "and push, don't twist the cutter.".Marcus Wareing and Rachel Allen's recipes are both rich and eggy, with a moist, golden crumb – delicious, but to my mind, more like a cake than a scone.The lard versions, which contain no sugar, are pleasingly puritanical, as befits the scone's Scottish heritage, crumbly – and utterly delicious once they've been rewarded with a dollop of raspberry jam.The secret, I think, whatever your preference, is not to skimp on the raising agent (self-raising flour alone doesn't seem to do the job), to work the mixture as little as possible – and make sure you don't roll it too thinly before cutting. .

Foolproof Scone Recipe

Foolproof Scone Recipe

Foolproof Scone Recipe

Today I’ll be sharing everything you need to know to make traditional, plain scones.A flaky, crisp exterior exposes a tender, buttery soft interior that melts away in your mouth.I’ll take you through my Foolproof Scone Recipe, a myriad of tips and step-by-step photos so that you can master them too.As a bonus, I’ve also provided notes on how to make a Small-Batch Scone Recipe too (to be found in the FAQ section).The delightful English scone has graced the plates for afternoon tea in kitchens for years.If you love an afternoon snack then you'll enjoy my Cherry Almond Scones, Chocolate Hazelnut Granola Bars or Lemon Poppy Seed Madeleines.Flour, butter, egg and milk make up the core ingredients of these scones and you're most likely going to have them in your kitchen.Flour, butter, egg and milk make up the core ingredients of these scones and you're most likely going to have them in your kitchen.Served alongside a cup of tea these make the perfect afternoon snack.Self-raising flour - Part of the success of making scones lies in the height that they rise.- Part of the success of making scones lies in the height that they rise.- Salt adds depth to the flavour and the extra baking powder helps create a little more lift.- I prefer full-fat milk due to the higher fat content which adds more richness to the dough.Unsalted butter - Has to be cold in order to create flaky layers within the scone.Into a large mixing bowl, sift in your dry ingredients; flour, baking powder and salt.If your kitchen is warm then measure out your ingredients and refrigerate them all for half an hour (mixing bowl included) before you crack on with the method.If you have warm hands, run them under cold water to reduce their temperature, then pat dry before handling the butter.Now rub the remaining cubes of butter into the flour but this time leave them larger until they are the size of peas.Tip the scone mix onto a lightly floured surface and using your hands, bring it together and gently flatten it out.We're going to use a folding technique to create flaky layers and incorporate air into the dough and minimise kneading.Dip a 6 cm (21⁄4-inch) cookie cutter in flour and stamp out 4 or 5 rounds.TIP: Dipping the cookie cutter in flour will help when cutting out the scones without them sticking.Note, that they won't rise quite as much as the first round, as you’ve worked the dough more than the first scones.TIP: If you forgot to set aside some egg wash, don't worry - brush the tops with milk.To change things up scones are delightful when served with other types of condiments such as lemon curd, blackberry jam and even a pear & ginger compote.Make a simple glaze of powdered icing sugar with a little citrus juice to drizzle on top of the scone for extra flavour.Make a simple glaze of powdered icing sugar with a little citrus juice to drizzle on top of the scone for extra flavour.: Any dried fruit such as sultanas, raisins, cranberries or chopped apricots are a wonderful addition.Berries : Frozen or fresh strawberries, blueberries or raspberries can add the perfect fruity kick.: Frozen or fresh strawberries, blueberries or raspberries can add the perfect fruity kick.Savoury: Add cheese, herbs or even crispy bacon pieces for the perfect accompaniment to your meal.The aim is to keep the butter as cold as possible when making the dough so that it melts when it hits the high heat, not before, and creates that uber flakey interior we're after.This prevents the activation of gluten and in turn, tough scones when baked.This allows the flour to hydrate, the gluten to relax, butter to re-chill and harden and baking powder to get to work.Add enough moisture to the dough so it feels slightly wet and sticky when you turn it out.I believe scones benefit from the egg as it binds the ingredients, adds flavour but also acts as a leavener and aids in the rise, leading to increased fluffiness.For the standard size recipe above, add 3 teaspoons of baking powder to 375g/3 cups plain (all-purpose) flour and stir together.Continue as per the recipe instructions and the other ingredients, including the stated baking powder.My pro tips cover what I believe to be foolproof techniques to make incredible scones.Don't forget to subscribe to the newsletter, so that you don’t miss out on more delicious food, tips and news but also the chance to download your FREE DESSERT E-BOOK! .

Easy Scone Recipe

Easy Scone Recipe

Easy Scone Recipe

Simple to share, and super easy to rustle up for any celebration, even one fit for a Queen this Jubilee. .

Plain flour or self raising flour, which flour is best for the job?

Plain flour or self raising flour, which flour is best for the job?

Plain flour or self raising flour, which flour is best for the job?

So if you’re new to breadmaking or thinking of taking it up, head over to our ‘getting started’ section to hone your skills.There are different systems for categorising flour in the UK, European countries and the USA.However the situation is more complicated and can depend on the protein content of the flour and the type of wheat used by the miller.NB: White flour is not bleached in the UK or Europe, though it may be in other parts of the world. .

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

I barely knead the dough at all, and just roller it out into the 1/2-inch thick round once the ingredients are well mixed.I don't have a stand mixer, and have added the butter two different ways: cutting the butter into small pieces and adding the pieces a little at a time, stirring them in, which resulted in a crustier, bumpier scone; and I have also softened the butter in the microwave, then mixed it into a soft paste and put it in the freezer for a few minutes to "re-cool". .

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