What Can I Substitute For Butter In Scones
Scones

What Can I Substitute For Butter In Scones

  • June 21, 2022

By reducing the amount of butter used, or eliminating it from the recipe entirely, you can prepare a healthier breakfast snack.Applesauce is a common and readily available substitute for butter in baked foods like cakes, muffins and cookies.It serves as a direct substitute, meaning that you can replace it in equal amounts in recipes, which typically measure it by the tablespoon.The taste of almond butter works well in scones as it pairs well with syrup, spices and fruit flavors commonly found in most recipes.Vegetable, canola, coconut, olive, soybean, sunflower and flaxseed oils can be used as alternatives to butter in scone recipes. .

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Imagine wandering into the kitchen on a chilly weekend morning, craving your favorite cream scones.You pull out your go-to recipe, gather your flour and sugar, then open the fridge only to gasp audibly.Your scone dreams aren’t crushed; you don’t need to abandon your beloved recipe.Swap butter and milk for heavy cream in any basic scone recipe, so you can always bake these classic treats — no matter what kind of dairy is in your fridge.If you’re a person who faithfully plans baking ahead and always has the necessary ingredients on hand, this substitution is still worth learning.Best for: Enjoying as is or with a cup of coffee or tea; can also be dressed up as shortcake and served alongside fruit.Cream scones' delicate texture is also just right for highlighting flavors like cardamom, cinnamon, espresso powder, and more.Reason to love them: They’re quick and easy to make and don’t require working the fat into the dry ingredients.With our easy substitution, you’ll be able to convert back and forth based on what you’re looking for (or what’s in your fridge at the moment).If your recipe doesn’t call for a full cup of heavy cream, scale down the amount of butter and milk that’s used accordingly.This ratio also works if you’d like to go in the other direction: You can replace the butter and milk in your recipe with heavy cream, basically using the same approach.Working in the cold butter in this fashion will give you a layered, slightly flaky scone.(Note: Let the butter and milk cool slightly if your recipe calls for adding eggs to the liquid.We put the substitution ratio to the test by comparing our classic Cream Tea Scones (left) with a batch converted to butter and milk (right).If you add a full cup of cream, your dough will be quite sticky, especially if the recipe also calls for eggs.Any leftover cream can be brushed on top of the dough to help your scones turn beautifully golden brown as they bake.If you keep in mind the tips and tricks we’ve taught you here, you’ll be able to transform any scone recipe to get exactly the results you’re looking for.We hope you'll whip up a batch and try a new flavor combination, or perhaps convert your favorite cream scones recipe to butter and milk to see which version you like best. .

Butter Substitute for Baking Scones

Butter Substitute for Baking Scones

Butter Substitute for Baking Scones

Spreadable varieties and "lite" margarine contain more air and water, which works on a slice of bread but not in baking.Lard gives scones and other pastries an excellent texture, so it's a viable option in an emergency.Coconut oil is a solid fat that works well in baking, and has many boosters touting its health benefits.On the downside, it also gives your baking a faint but unmistakable hint of coconut aroma and flavor. .

The Lightest, Fluffiest Scones Skip This Important Ingredient

The Lightest, Fluffiest Scones Skip This Important Ingredient

The Lightest, Fluffiest Scones Skip This Important Ingredient

Today’s menu: foolproof cream scones, thanks to an unexpected missing ingredient.The standard scone-making approach is the same as with biscuits: Stir together dry ingredients (flour, a little sugar and salt, plus any leaveners—baking powder, baking soda, or both).Cut in cold butter with your fingertips, a pastry blender, or a food processor.But a couple months ago, I was re-reading A Boat, a Whale & a Walrus by Renee Erickson, and the Boat Street Scones’ ingredient list caught my eye: flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, kosher salt, dried currants, lemon zest, heavy cream, and demerara sugar.In the headnote, Erickson writes about how she learned the recipe from the since-closed Boat Street Café, and how it’s become her go-to: “I always have excess cream in my refrigerator, so on a Sunday morning when I wake up hungry, [these scones are] my go-to when I know friends might stop by.”.Just dump dry ingredients in a bowl, mix in cream, pat dough into a circle, cut into triangles, and bake.One day, the Food52 team was sampling some scone recipe tests and Director of Partner Content Cory Baldwin remarked that she makes biscuits in a similar way.Blogger Deb Perelman adapted the recipe from James Beard’s American Cookery, originally published in 1980.If you’ve never worked with this ingredient before—it’s just like regular whole-wheat, but milled from white wheat flour instead, which means a lighter color and subtler flavor. .

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

We’re going to tell you which steps are crucial (don’t skip the rubbing in of the butter) and which can be flexed!These scones are round, almost cylinder like shaped, often with a curved on the outside.They don’t have to be round anymore and come in various shapes, sizes and even flavors.Compare a ‘typical’ British scones to an American one and you’ll likely notice a difference in size, sweetness and absence (or presence) of fillings.But, biscuits tend to be savoury, even salty, whereas most scones are more neutral, or slightly sweet.Classic British scones in the UK, eaten with clotted cream & jam.You can tear a chunk from a baguette, but it won’t break or fall apart easily.The reason these breads behave this way is because of the formation of a gluten network.These breads are kneaded extensively, or left to rest for long periods of time.When making scones on the other hand, you do NOT want this gluten network to form.The absence of a gluten network helps keep a scone flaky.Another important factor contributing to the flakiness is the presence of pockets of fat.Fat prevents proteins, but also starches in the flour from coming together and forming a structure.In the oven, these leavening agents will react and form carbon dioxide, a gas.To create a nice, light texture, it’s also important to add the right amount of liquid.You can use baking soda if you’ve added an acidic ingredient to the dough (e.g. buttermilk, vinegar, lemon juice).Savory scones, these do start to show overlaps with the American biscuit!Step one of most scones recipes tends to be to: rub in the butter (or other type of solid fat) into the flour.Most commonly you’ll find recipes using butter, margarine, lard, or shortening.They can all make a good scone, with slight differences in texture.The liquid oil won’t be able to make those larger pockets of fat.As we’ll learn in the next step, overmixing only becomes a problem once water joins the party.As such, you can rub in the fat by hand, but you might just as well use a food processor, or a stand mixer for instance.For a gluten network to form, you need water, time and kneading.Water ensures the protein molecules can move freely, to find each other and interact.When kneading a dough, you’re actively helping the gluten network to form.It’s why any scone recipe will caution you against extensive kneading or mixing once you’ve added the water.As soon as the dough starts to come together, stop the mixer and continue by hand.Keep in mind though that some fillings help improve the flakiness of a scone, whereas other can do the exact opposite!Generally speaking, fat-based fillings will be easy to incorporate without ruining the texture.Water based, very liquid fillings on the other hand, should be handled with care.Therefore, cheese will serve a similar function as the butter in your scone, it will help keep it crumbly and light.The more you knead and break it, the more moisture will be released and the more the scone will be affected.A good fruit we found is cranberries, they barely release any moisture when they’re uncooked!If you do want to add more moist fruit, reduce the amount of milk you’re adding.If there are still large clumps of flour or pockets with a lot of water, it won’t hold together in those areas.If you double the amount of butter in our recipe, they’ll turn out more like cookies (we tested it for you).Keep in mind that after rubbing in the fat into the flour, it should give a crumbly texture.Using milk instead of water can give a slightly browner scone and a little (but not much) extra flavor.If your scones barely rise in the oven, reconsider the amount of water you’ve added.If you’re using baking soda, take care that you’ve added at least one sour ingredient (e.g. buttermilk).By now, it’s hopefully clear that you do have a lot of creative freedoms when making scones.This ensures an even distribution of the fat and the creation of those buttery pockets.Top left : substitutes milk for water, a little bland in color, but identical taste-wise.Bottom two : contain twice the amount of butter, turned out more like cookies than scones! .

How to Substitute Oil for Butter in Almost Any Recipe

How to Substitute Oil for Butter in Almost Any Recipe

How to Substitute Oil for Butter in Almost Any Recipe

Trust me, I’ve tested them all – sauces, spreads, cakes, pie crusts, and yes, even cookies.When we went strictly dairy free, there weren’t dairy-free butter alternatives readily available at the grocery store.Buttery spreads as we know them today didn’t exist, and every margarine brand in my town contained some form of dairy.I must have tested dozens of batches before I finally created the perfect chocolate chip cookie with oil.Even with all of the vegan butters that have emerged, those are still my favorite cookies, and have been requested countless times by friends for parties.Oil works so well that I haven’t purchased a dairy-free buttery spread in years.I even make my own vegan butter from oil at home (recipe in Go Dairy Free if you have it!).It’s a stable emulsion that generally doesn’t separate, and it sets up easily but remains relatively soft.So if you’re trying to avoid “too much oil” you won’t be saving much by purchasing vegan butter or margarine.It’s not emulsified, it’s pure fat so there isn’t variation in composition, and there are no added ingredients.This section covers the general types of oil based on certain key properties for cooking and baking.They have a high percentage of saturated fat, which means they solidify at lower temperatures.If you want to avoid these oils, vegan butter alternatives aren’t your answer.It can also provide richness and density in recipes, but it sets up very firmly and isn’t as easy to find in stores.Since these oils have a much lower amount of saturate fat, they don’t easily set up, even in the freezer.Oil is often refined for two primary reasons: to make it more heat stable and to create a more neutral flavor.So you aren’t gaming the system if you buy a “healthy” oil and use it improperly.Refined oils typically have a higher smoke point to make them more versatile in the kitchen.And pay attention to what you want from the recipe – do you need the firmness of a highly-saturated oil, or would that actually be a problem?Recipe Samples: Wacky Chocolate Cupcakes and Vegan Blueberry Muffins .Recipe Samples: Quick Shortcake Biscuits and Oil Pie Crust .– Use half the amount of oil in cookie recipes that call for butter, but add liquid as needed.– For a simpler option, non-hydrogenated shortening (which is whipped oil) performs very well in a 1:1 ratio for butter in cookies.You can brush on oil, milk beverage, or honey (for sweeter) with good results.Frosting – For seamless results, substitute non-hydrogenated shortening (whipped oil) in a 1:1 ratio for butter.You can use coconut oil, but it won’t be stable for long at warmer room temperatures.– For seamless results, substitute non-hydrogenated shortening (whipped oil) in a 1:1 ratio for butter.You can use coconut oil, but it won’t be stable for long at warmer room temperatures.If your recipe calls for melted butter specifically or ghee , you should be able to substitute oil in a 1:1 ratio with good results.For most sweet recipes, you’ll want to use a lighter tasting oil, but chocolate recipes, like chocolate cake , taste good with richer oils, like olive and avocado. .

Vegan Scones

Vegan Scones

Vegan Scones

Scones are a classic British afternoon tea staple, and they also happen to be incredibly quick and easy to make at home.I did a fair bit of testing to come up with this ultimate vegan scone recipe; I tried various different fats, milks, buttermilk, yogurt etc and this version was by far my favourite.They are light and moist, with a pleasing amount of crumble and just enough sweetness; the perfect scone for a vegan afternoon tea!Refined coconut oil - I did a lot of testing to perfect these vegan scones and found that the ones that used half refined coconut oil and half vegan block butter had the best flavour and texture.I glaze the vegan scones with a mixture of soy milk and maple syrup which gives them a lovely colour.Scones go stale very quickly and are best eaten as fresh as possible, ideally within a couple of hours of being baked.They would also be lovely served with my vegan lemon curd or plum and amaretto jam.Start by mixing together self-raising flour and baking powder in a large bowl until they are well combined.Add cold, diced vegan block butter and solid refined coconut oil and rub them in using your fingertips until no lumps of fat remain and the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.I find that the back of a table knife is the best tool for this job, it enables you to cut the liquid through without over-mixing the dough.If there are any dry, floury bits left in the bottom of the bowl add a drop more milk to mix them in.Turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, don't knead it but use your hands to kneaten it a little and pat it out into a round about 4cm/1 ½ inches thick.Use a 6cm/2 ⅓ inch round cutter (plain or fluted is fine) to cut out four scones.Very gently bring the scraps of dough back together, pat out into a round again and cut out two or three more scones.Brush the tops of the scones with a mixture of milk and maple syrup to glaze.1.Your butter and milk should be fridge cold, not room temperature; and the coconut oil (if using) should be solid.Placing the cut scones on the baking tray upside down can help them to rise more evenly.Get the scones into the oven as soon as possible, don't leave them sitting around as the raising agents start to work straight away.Then, when you want your scones, transfer them to a prepared tray and pop them straight into the preheated oven from frozen. .

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

How to Make Scones

You can dress them up by adding nuts, citrus zest, or chocolate chips.Or simply serve them plain alongside some local jam or homemade flavored butter.How to Make Scones Overview: How to Make the BEST Scone Recipe Combine the dry ingredients: in a large bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda.Whisk the wet ingredients: in a separate large mixing bowl, combine the buttermilk, egg, and vanilla extract.If you’re adding in any flavorings such as chocolate chips or dried fruit, add them in now.Cut each round into 8 wedges and place on prepared baking pans.Brush egg wash over the scones and bake until golden brown.As the steam escapes, it bursts up and creates that beautiful tall, flaky, fluffy texture.My absolute favorite tool for making biscuits or scone dough quickly and easily by hand (so I don’t have to lug out my food processor) is this OXO bladed pastry blender.If at any point you notice the butter become greasy and melty, pop the dough into the freezer for 10 to 15 minutes before proceeding.You can also pop the baking sheet of shaped unbaked scones in the fridge or freezer while the oven preheats to ensure the butter remains nice and cold.How to Make Tall, Flaky Scones BONUS tip: We’re stealing a trick from croissant baking that I use in my Best Ever Pie Crust recipe!A little bit of lamination gets the scones to shoot up sky high with tons of flaky layers.Check out my How to Make Tall Scones & Biscuits article for more tips.I actually demonstrated this during a live Zoom class exclusively for HTH Students earlier this year.But you can add in about 3/4 cup of dried fruit, chocolate chips, nuts, etc., to the dough.Use a spatula to gently fold in 1 1/2 cups blueberries to the scone dough as a final step before shaping.Citrus zest, to taste, if desired Directions: Whisk all glaze ingredients together until thick but still pourable.Easy scone recipe that is ultra buttery, flaky, and flavorful.Coarse sugar Directions Adjust the oven rack to the center position and preheat to 400°F.In a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, 1 egg, and vanilla extract.Cut each round into 8 wedges and place on your prepared baking pans.MAKE AHEAD At this point the unbaked scones can be refrigerated overnight, or sealed and frozen for up to 1 month.In a small bowl, combine the remaining egg with 1 teaspoon water.Recipe Video Recipe Notes OPTIONAL STEP : Here's how to laminate your scone dough: Turn the craggly mass of scone dough out onto your work surface.Every month you can join the challenge by baking the recipe and snapping a photo for a chance to win prizes!This recipe was originally published in May 2017 and was recently updated in 2021 with new photos and more baking tips! .

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