What's The Best Cheese For Scones
Scones

What's The Best Cheese For Scones

  • June 30, 2022

Warm from the oven and eaten slathered in butter, there can’t be many home baked savouries that are so comforting yet take hardly any time to make from scratch.Here I share my easy and delicious recipe that knocks the socks off bland, mass-produced cheese scones.But I can’t understand why so many people buy bland, boring ones found in supermarkets when they’re so quick and easy to make at home.Often looking tasty enough, as if they’d have a good cheesy bite, the ones I’ve tried (including some labelled as made ‘the truly Artisanal way’) have been largely dreadful with very little flavour and an unpleasant, dry texture.At this stage you can also add some mustard powder or a little cayenne if you’d like some heat, or Spanish paprika for a smoky vibe.A mature Cheddar is ideal and that’s what I tend to use, complemented by some finely grated Parmesan for extra flavour.When forming the dough, start off with a rubber spoon or spatula to bring the mixture together, then switch to gently using your hands.Handling the dough as little as possible should help to keep the finished scones nice and soft inside, so just give it a few seconds’ light kneading before rolling out onto a floured surface.For extra cheesiness I sprinkle over more grated cheese after brushing the tops with a little yogurt, thinned with water, to help it stick.When they’re nicely risen and browned, transfer the scones to a wire rack to cool a little – if you can resist the wonderful cheesy aroma – before having at them with the butter and a blissful grin.250 ml yogurt (or milk or buttermilk or any of these diluted with water) plus extra for brushing the tops of the scones Instructions Preheat oven to 200C/180C Fan/Gas 6 and lightly grease a baking tray.Brush a little yogurt thinned with water over the tops of the scones then sprinkle with the remaining 25g of grated cheese. .

How to make the perfect cheese scones

How to make the perfect cheese scones

How to make the perfect cheese scones

But, most of all, I love a great golden billow of a savoury scone, topped with a decorous straw hat of toasted cheese.Indeed, my interest in historic houses can be almost solely attributed to the vast cheese scones on sale at every National Trust cafe.In my not inconsiderable experience, however, you have to time your visit carefully to get them at their freshly baked best – whereas at home, you’re always perfectly placed to pounce, making this a very dangerous recipe indeed.Though this column is firmly against discrimination of any kind, there’s no denying that the success of a scone can be largely determined with a ruler – they stand, or indeed fall, on their height, which means that most recipes I try use more than one raising agent, with only Delia Smith and the kitchens of Gwynedd’s Penrhyn castle relying solely on self-raising flour.However, Rox, daughter of Jo Holland, who has published her recipe on her own blog Notes from the Menu, uses extra baking powder, and baker Justin Gellatly makes his own from bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar in his book Bread, Cake, Doughnut, Pudding.Butter is the fat of choice in all the cheese scone recipes I try, but its consistency varies, with Gellatly using it chilled, while Penrhyn Castle prefers it softened, and Bertie, the chef at the wonderfully named Scorch-O-Rama cafe in Scorching Bay, Wellington, New Zealand – who makes what one customer describes as “the best scones I’ve ever tasted” – melting it before use.Keeping the fat cool seems wise: it means it melts more slowly, creating little pockets in the dough as it rises, and giving the finished scone a flakier texture.Personally, I’d prefer more butter, which makes the crumb softer and richer, while I suspect the protein in the egg might contribute to testers finding Smith’s scones a wee bit tough (though this could also be the fact that they end up slightly overbaked, of which more later).Smith and Gellatly both use buttermilk, the acid in which should help to give their scones a tender texture, but my testing panel can’t tell the difference, while the tangy flavour is lost under the cheese.Simple milk and water seems the best bet here – Penrhyn’s dough is softer and wetter than some of the others, and I credit this hydration for its impressive rise.If I’m buying something specially, rather than using up a lot of odds and ends from the fridge, I like a mature red leicester, as much for its bright orange colour as its lovely flavour.Though cheese is pretty good on its own, as any aficionado of Welsh rarebit will testify, it’s even better with mustard, particularly the fiery English variety favoured by Rox, Smith and Gellatly.The last adds further heat in the form of smoked, and hot, paprika while Bertie and Smith prefer cayenne pepper, but, nice as these all are with cheese, the panel come down in favour of mustard, which they think brings out its flavour better, rather than competing with it.The shaping process is, according to many, similarly vital, with Smith, Rox and Penrhyn castle all cautioning bakers “to be very careful not to roll the dough out too thinly … the secret of well-risen scones is to start off with a thickness no less than an inch.” This seems reasonable advice, unless you’re after an English muffin.Warm cheese scones and cold butter – better even than the plain sort with clotted cream and jam, or do you have an even better recipe up your sleeve? .

Cheddar Cheese Scones (Freezer Friendly!)

Cheddar Cheese Scones (Freezer Friendly!)

Cheddar Cheese Scones (Freezer Friendly!)

Not only are they easy to make, but I’ve shared my favorite tips to ensure they come out tender and light every time.Scones are the English partner to American biscuits — and these are upscaled for any time enjoyment!While scones often have added fruits (like blueberries or cranberries), I personally prefer a savory addition, like Cabot Seriously Sharp Cheddar and a sprinkle of chives.They’re quick and easy to make and all you need is a bowl, a wooden spoon and some great cheese!The cheese is folded into the dough ensuring savory goodness you can see throughout the flaky layers.They are a certified B corporation which means they meet the highest standards of social and environmental performance.Cabot Seriously Sharp adds great flavor to this recipe but swap it out with any of the following add-ins to make these scones your own!The cold butter creates pockets giving layers and a flaky texture.When patting out the dough, very lightly flour your surface if needed, I prefer to work on parchment paper. .

The BEST Cheese Scones

The BEST Cheese Scones

The BEST Cheese Scones

I spent a few years until I got to what I wanted, which was to bite into a pool of melted cheese and a sharp flavor at the same time.Enter these double cheese scones, so good you’ll want to make them all the time.Scones ranked very high on my list of things to serve, and let me tell you these became quite famous among the regular crowd.So when it was time to look for my own cheese scone, I went straight to a recipe I’d had my eye on what seemed like forever.At first, it didn’t bother me a bit, those golden triangles were flying off the wooden plate.But a few weeks later, a regular customer came to me and commented that he had to stop at one because they were too heavy to have in the morning.They were little bombs, tons of double cream, eggs, and a humongous amount of butter.what makes these scones different - and in my opinion better - are the two kinds of cheese (image above).Sour cream and milk: this is the liquid part and I always use full fat or regular.You can use low-fat but take into account that they differ in consistency and ingredients depending on the brand, especially sour cream.You can use low-fat but take into account that they differ in consistency and ingredients depending on the brand, especially sour cream.If you do want shapes, choose large ones like starts or those that have few details and sharp angles.And don’t take the cream half an hour before you start mixing the scones.They need that extra heat (and baking powder) to rise however they can in spite of all that butter and cream.And if by any chance you forgot to turn the oven on before you start with the mixing, please don’t leave the baking sheet with the cut scones waiting on the counter.Put them in the fridge or freezer the ten or fifteen minutes it takes for the oven to reach its temperature.When you sell food, the visual aspect is very important, so I was somewhat concerned about that cheese melting in the oven and turning dark and crispy around the scones, because, well, they looked too rustic and homey.It ended up being the main reason these cheese scones were a hit, they had to have those cheesy bits or customers would complain.I used to serve one of these cheese scones, warm, with a bowl of soup (pumpkin or leek/potato) and a small green salad.You might also consider subscribing to our FREE email series to Boost your Home Baking Skills!I spent a few years until I got what I wanted, which was to bite into a pool of melted cheese and a sharp flavor at the same time.Enter these double cheese scones, so good you’ll want to make them all the time.2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh dill or 2 teaspoons dried or fresh thyme (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 375ºF / 190ºC Cut cheeses into bite size pieces.In a small bowl lightly mix egg, sour cream and milk.In the bowl of a food processor, mix flour, sugar, baking powder and salt.Transfer to a large bowl, add wet ingredients and mix with a fork until you have a shaggy mass with some dry patches.Dump onto a lightly floured counter, cut in half and form one of the pieces into a rough rectangle.Cut scones into triangles with a kitchen knife or dough scraper, or use a round cookie cutter (dip it in flour and make one clean press down, don’t rotate it left and right when cutting, as it will prevent the scones from rising properly).Transfer to a greased baking pan or lined with parchment paper.Bake for about 25 to 30 minutes, until golden, dry and cheese has melted and crusted.Top tips: The first rule of scone baking is very cold ingredients.And don’t take the cream half an hour before you start mixing the scones.And don’t take the cream half an hour before you start mixing the scones.They need that extra heat (and baking powder) to rise however they can in spite of all that butter and cream.And if by any chance you forgot to turn the oven on before you start with the mixing, please don’t leave the baking sheet with the cut scones waiting on the counter.Put them in the fridge or freezer the ten or fifteen minutes it takes for the oven to reach its temperature. .

Classic British Cheese Scones Recipe

Classic British Cheese Scones Recipe

Classic British Cheese Scones Recipe

One key to light and fluffy scones that rise well is to use a delicate hand when combining the ingredients so the finished product doesn't become overly dense.A good scone will have a bit of a craggy-looking top and a crumbly but not dry texture; it definitely should resemble a cake, cookie, or a muffin. .

Cheese Scones – best recipe ever! – Life and Cheese

Cheese Scones – best recipe ever! – Life and Cheese

Cheese Scones – best recipe ever! – Life and Cheese

Like saying sorry to your neighbour for getting the wrong tree cut down, or ‘oops – inside thought‘ to a friend, or ‘thank you’ to a colleague.It’s close to our Parliament buildings and I got addicted to these scones when I was working near by.Mix quickly by making slicing actions with a knife, just enough to bind together.Touch the mixture as little as possible and get it into the oven asap after mixing the milk in.Oh and one last thing, use a strong tasty cheddar for a truly delicious scone.Sift flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and cayenne pepper into a bowl.Check you have a clear bench with flour on it, the oven is fully heated.Turn out onto a floured bench and quickly shape into a 3 cm thick rectangle. .

Cheddar Cheese and Scallion Scones

Cheddar Cheese and Scallion Scones

Cheddar Cheese and Scallion Scones

Mix together the eggs and cream (or dairy of your choice); and the mustard and hot sauce (if you're using them).Add to the dry ingredients, stirring just until everything is evenly moistened; the dough will be very sticky. .

Ham and Cheese Scones

Ham and Cheese Scones

Ham and Cheese Scones

With chunks of crisp ham, cheddar cheese and chives, this is one breakfast item worth waking up for. .

perfect-fluffy-cheese-scones

perfect-fluffy-cheese-scones

perfect-fluffy-cheese-scones

Whatever time of day it is, there’s something incredibly comforting about serving warm, light and fluffy cheese scones with melted butter and a pot of tea.When they were little, we’d jump on our cheap shuttle flights from Beauvais to Prestwick, and on arrival, it was so exciting to see Granny and Grandpa waiting for us.This was always followed with our family tradition: we’d head straight to the nearest garden centre for a pot of tea and the most delicious cheesy scones served with lashings of butter.The girls would always associate their trips to Scotland with cheese scones and so they’d ask to have them occasionally at home for a special treats (in between the macarons, tuiles, éclairs and tarts, les pauvres!).However, living in France, cheese scones are not one of the treats you’ll find in Parisian bakeries.Too dry makes them crumbly; and Don’t work the dough too much – including not rolling it out too flat.We just split our cheese scones in half while warm and spread on a little butter, watching it melt.Ideally use a good, strong, mature cheddar (orange will give it a lovely colour but it’s not necessary) as the flavour should shine through.Using half of grated aged parmesan or a mature hard orange vieille mimolette adds extra punch too.Personally, as we don’t have the easiest access to the best mature cheddar in France, I use a half and half mix of what orange cheddar I can find with best quality French Comté cheese (preference 12-18 months mature), thus making them a bit of a Scottish-French Auld Alliance.The cheese scones have a lovely, finished shine that gives that slight crunch to the outside and split open warm, they’re soft, light and fluffy inside – ready to spread with quickly melting butter!Cheese scones are also a real treat served for a light lunch with a comforting bowl of soup.4.85 from 20 votes Fluffy Cheese Scones Author: Jill Colonna Prep Time 25 mins Cook Time 15 mins Total Time 40 mins Servings : 6 people Calories : 293 kcal Print Recipe Description An easy recipe using plain flour - with tips on how to make the fluffiest, high-rise light cheese scones for teatime Ingredients 250 g (9oz) Plain (all-purpose) flour T55.1 tbsp Rosemary, finely chopped (or fresh thyme, chives, dried Herbes de Provence).Mix together the flour, baking powder/soda, salt, pepper, and rosemary (or other herbs) in a large bowl.Roll out on a floured surface to about 2 cm thick (nearly an inch) and using a scone/cookie cutter (6cm/2.5"), cut out medium-sized rounds.Alternatively, to save time or if you don't have cutters, roll into a circle (use a plate as a guide) and cut into triangles with a sharp knife. .

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