Why Are My Scones Like Cake
Scones

Why Are My Scones Like Cake

  • June 22, 2022

We’re going to tell you which steps are crucial (don’t skip the rubbing in of the butter) and which can be flexed!These scones are round, almost cylinder like shaped, often with a curved on the outside.They don’t have to be round anymore and come in various shapes, sizes and even flavors.Compare a ‘typical’ British scones to an American one and you’ll likely notice a difference in size, sweetness and absence (or presence) of fillings.But, biscuits tend to be savoury, even salty, whereas most scones are more neutral, or slightly sweet.Classic British scones in the UK, eaten with clotted cream & jam.You can tear a chunk from a baguette, but it won’t break or fall apart easily.The reason these breads behave this way is because of the formation of a gluten network.These breads are kneaded extensively, or left to rest for long periods of time.When making scones on the other hand, you do NOT want this gluten network to form.The absence of a gluten network helps keep a scone flaky.Another important factor contributing to the flakiness is the presence of pockets of fat.Fat prevents proteins, but also starches in the flour from coming together and forming a structure.In the oven, these leavening agents will react and form carbon dioxide, a gas.To create a nice, light texture, it’s also important to add the right amount of liquid.You can use baking soda if you’ve added an acidic ingredient to the dough (e.g. buttermilk, vinegar, lemon juice).Savory scones, these do start to show overlaps with the American biscuit!Step one of most scones recipes tends to be to: rub in the butter (or other type of solid fat) into the flour.Most commonly you’ll find recipes using butter, margarine, lard, or shortening.They can all make a good scone, with slight differences in texture.The liquid oil won’t be able to make those larger pockets of fat.As we’ll learn in the next step, overmixing only becomes a problem once water joins the party.As such, you can rub in the fat by hand, but you might just as well use a food processor, or a stand mixer for instance.For a gluten network to form, you need water, time and kneading.Water ensures the protein molecules can move freely, to find each other and interact.When kneading a dough, you’re actively helping the gluten network to form.It’s why any scone recipe will caution you against extensive kneading or mixing once you’ve added the water.As soon as the dough starts to come together, stop the mixer and continue by hand.Keep in mind though that some fillings help improve the flakiness of a scone, whereas other can do the exact opposite!Generally speaking, fat-based fillings will be easy to incorporate without ruining the texture.Water based, very liquid fillings on the other hand, should be handled with care.Therefore, cheese will serve a similar function as the butter in your scone, it will help keep it crumbly and light.The more you knead and break it, the more moisture will be released and the more the scone will be affected.A good fruit we found is cranberries, they barely release any moisture when they’re uncooked!If you do want to add more moist fruit, reduce the amount of milk you’re adding.If there are still large clumps of flour or pockets with a lot of water, it won’t hold together in those areas.If you double the amount of butter in our recipe, they’ll turn out more like cookies (we tested it for you).Keep in mind that after rubbing in the fat into the flour, it should give a crumbly texture.Using milk instead of water can give a slightly browner scone and a little (but not much) extra flavor.If your scones barely rise in the oven, reconsider the amount of water you’ve added.If you’re using baking soda, take care that you’ve added at least one sour ingredient (e.g. buttermilk).By now, it’s hopefully clear that you do have a lot of creative freedoms when making scones.This ensures an even distribution of the fat and the creation of those buttery pockets.Top left : substitutes milk for water, a little bland in color, but identical taste-wise.Bottom two : contain twice the amount of butter, turned out more like cookies than scones! .

Scones

Scones

Scones

After baking many batches of scones, I found the secret to success boils down to one simple ingredient: cake flour.Less gluten forms when you mix it into the batter, which results in a very fine, fluffy crumb.In a large bowl, whisk together 2 cups cake flour, 2½ teaspoons baking powder, 2½ tablespoons granulated sugar, and a scant ¾ teaspoon salt.Add 5 tablespoons cold butter, cut into small pieces.Press dough into a flat circle about 7 inches in diameter and ¾-inch thick.Brush lightly with a beaten egg and sprinkle with about 1 tablespoon demerara sugar.Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, until the tops are lightly golden and firm to the touch.Serve warm from the oven with softened butter or jam. .

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Cream scones vs. butter scones

Imagine wandering into the kitchen on a chilly weekend morning, craving your favorite cream scones.You pull out your go-to recipe, gather your flour and sugar, then open the fridge only to gasp audibly.Your scone dreams aren’t crushed; you don’t need to abandon your beloved recipe.Swap butter and milk for heavy cream in any basic scone recipe, so you can always bake these classic treats — no matter what kind of dairy is in your fridge.If you’re a person who faithfully plans baking ahead and always has the necessary ingredients on hand, this substitution is still worth learning.Best for: Enjoying as is or with a cup of coffee or tea; can also be dressed up as shortcake and served alongside fruit.Cream scones' delicate texture is also just right for highlighting flavors like cardamom, cinnamon, espresso powder, and more.Reason to love them: They’re quick and easy to make and don’t require working the fat into the dry ingredients.Texture: Layered, usually with craggy, crisp edges and sometimes slightly dry (while still pleasant).If your recipe doesn’t call for a full cup of heavy cream, scale down the amount of butter and milk that’s used accordingly.This ratio also works if you’d like to go in the other direction: You can replace the butter and milk in your recipe with heavy cream, basically using the same approach.Working in the cold butter in this fashion will give you a layered, slightly flaky scone.(Note: Let the butter and milk cool slightly if your recipe calls for adding eggs to the liquid.We put the substitution ratio to the test by comparing our classic Cream Tea Scones (left) with a batch converted to butter and milk (right).If you add a full cup of cream, your dough will be quite sticky, especially if the recipe also calls for eggs.Any leftover cream can be brushed on top of the dough to help your scones turn beautifully golden brown as they bake.If you keep in mind the tips and tricks we’ve taught you here, you’ll be able to transform any scone recipe to get exactly the results you’re looking for.We hope you'll whip up a batch and try a new flavor combination, or perhaps convert your favorite cream scones recipe to butter and milk to see which version you like best. .

Mini Birthday Cake Scones

Mini Birthday Cake Scones

Mini Birthday Cake Scones

Scones are really an easy baked good to master, and they can take on practically any flavor profile.Then cut each circle in 8 equal pieces and you’ll end up with 16 mini scones.Don’t worry if it’s not completely mixed together since kneading the scone dough will help it fully come together.You can even put your butter in the freezer before using in the recipe for perfect, flakey scones.For extra texture and sweetness, you can add ⅓ cup of white chocolate chips to the scones along with the rainbow sprinkles.Made with funfetti cake mix and rainbow sprinkles, these mini scones are so fun and festive.Their mini size makes them perfect for sharing at a birthday party.½ cup (1 stick) very cold unsalted butter cut into small cubes.2 tsp vanilla extract Instructions Preheat the oven to 400 Fahrenheit In a large bowl whisk together the flour, funfetti cake mix, sugar, baking powder, and salt Add the pieces of cold butter and cut into the dough using a pastry cutter or a fork until texture is a coarse meal.You want the butter to be small, (similar to making pie crust) Lightly whisk together the heavy cream, egg, and vanilla extract.Bake for 12-14 minutes until golden brown While scones are cooling, make the glaze.If glaze is too thin, add more powdered sugar, too thick, add more heavy cream or milk Dip scones into glaze or simply drizzle on top of each scone.Let the glaze set for about 20 minutes before serving Recipe Notes Store scones in an airtight container on the counter for up to 3 days.Oxo Good Grips Pastry Blender | Silicone Baking Mats. .

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

Scones Recipe

I barely knead the dough at all, and just roller it out into the 1/2-inch thick round once the ingredients are well mixed.I don't have a stand mixer, and have added the butter two different ways: cutting the butter into small pieces and adding the pieces a little at a time, stirring them in, which resulted in a crustier, bumpier scone; and I have also softened the butter in the microwave, then mixed it into a soft paste and put it in the freezer for a few minutes to "re-cool". .

Carrot Cake Scones

Carrot Cake Scones

Carrot Cake Scones

I have been planning on making carrot cake scones for some time now.These are not only cute, they taste amazing and make a great addition to a breakfast, brunch or dessert, all spring long…Easter parties, and are also great at Thanksgiving too!1/2 cup chopped walnuts Instructions Mix together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt.Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.Add milk, extract, cinnamon along with eggs, mix until blended, then stir in carrots and nuts.Knead on a floured surface, cut with a cookie cutter to the desired shape. .

Carrot Cake Scones For Easter

Carrot Cake Scones For Easter

Carrot Cake Scones For Easter

And the colors (beautiful, soft pastels) and imagery (bunnies, eggs, and baskets) are visual mood-lifters.I like to play with this theme and “egg” my friends and neighbors to spread some extra cheer at this time of year.One downside to making scones that aren’t hard as bricks, is that the dough can be sticky.Carrot Cake Scones Cook Mode Prevent your screen from going dark Wondermom Wannabe 5 from 1 vote Print Recipe Pin Recipe Ingredients For Scones 2 cups all-purpose flour.1 cup shredded carrots For Decorating Frosting 40 orange melting chocolate wafers.Add the butter and using your hands, incorporate it into the dry ingredients until the mixture looks like large crumbs.Add the milk and gently incorporate it by using a rubber spatula to fold it into the dough.Using a piping bag (or plastic zipper bag with a corner cut off), drizzle the orange chocolate in a zigzag pattern on each scone to create the “carrot.” Next, repeat the process with the green wafers to create the “carrot tops.” Allow chocolate to set completely (5-10 minutes) before serving.The consistency of scones is ideal for making this swap since they are coarse and dense by nature.For mine, I used skim (fat-free) milk and didn’t notice any negative effect on the taste or texture of the scone.I haven’t tried that yet so I can’t vouch for the end-product, but I would guess that you could also reduce or eliminate the brown sugar since bananas are so sweet. .

Foolproof English Scones ~Sweet & Savory

Foolproof English Scones ~Sweet & Savory

Foolproof English Scones ~Sweet & Savory

Tip This mixing method ensures light and tender texture, because fat from the butter coats the flour granules therefore limiting gluten formation.Now, it’s time to add wet ingredients into the flour mixture and mix it until combined. .

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