Why Do My Scones Come Out Crumbly
Scones

Why Do My Scones Come Out Crumbly

  • July 15, 2022

We’re going to tell you which steps are crucial (don’t skip the rubbing in of the butter) and which can be flexed!These scones are round, almost cylinder like shaped, often with a curved on the outside.They don’t have to be round anymore and come in various shapes, sizes and even flavors.Compare a ‘typical’ British scones to an American one and you’ll likely notice a difference in size, sweetness and absence (or presence) of fillings.But, biscuits tend to be savoury, even salty, whereas most scones are more neutral, or slightly sweet.Classic British scones in the UK, eaten with clotted cream & jam.You can tear a chunk from a baguette, but it won’t break or fall apart easily.The reason these breads behave this way is because of the formation of a gluten network.These breads are kneaded extensively, or left to rest for long periods of time.When making scones on the other hand, you do NOT want this gluten network to form.The absence of a gluten network helps keep a scone flaky.Another important factor contributing to the flakiness is the presence of pockets of fat.Fat prevents proteins, but also starches in the flour from coming together and forming a structure.In the oven, these leavening agents will react and form carbon dioxide, a gas.To create a nice, light texture, it’s also important to add the right amount of liquid.You can use baking soda if you’ve added an acidic ingredient to the dough (e.g. buttermilk, vinegar, lemon juice).Savory scones, these do start to show overlaps with the American biscuit!Step one of most scones recipes tends to be to: rub in the butter (or other type of solid fat) into the flour.Most commonly you’ll find recipes using butter, margarine, lard, or shortening.They can all make a good scone, with slight differences in texture.The liquid oil won’t be able to make those larger pockets of fat.As we’ll learn in the next step, overmixing only becomes a problem once water joins the party.As such, you can rub in the fat by hand, but you might just as well use a food processor, or a stand mixer for instance.For a gluten network to form, you need water, time and kneading.Water ensures the protein molecules can move freely, to find each other and interact.When kneading a dough, you’re actively helping the gluten network to form.It’s why any scone recipe will caution you against extensive kneading or mixing once you’ve added the water.As soon as the dough starts to come together, stop the mixer and continue by hand.Keep in mind though that some fillings help improve the flakiness of a scone, whereas other can do the exact opposite!Generally speaking, fat-based fillings will be easy to incorporate without ruining the texture.Water based, very liquid fillings on the other hand, should be handled with care.Therefore, cheese will serve a similar function as the butter in your scone, it will help keep it crumbly and light.The more you knead and break it, the more moisture will be released and the more the scone will be affected.A good fruit we found is cranberries, they barely release any moisture when they’re uncooked!If you do want to add more moist fruit, reduce the amount of milk you’re adding.If there are still large clumps of flour or pockets with a lot of water, it won’t hold together in those areas.If you double the amount of butter in our recipe, they’ll turn out more like cookies (we tested it for you).Keep in mind that after rubbing in the fat into the flour, it should give a crumbly texture.Using milk instead of water can give a slightly browner scone and a little (but not much) extra flavor.If your scones barely rise in the oven, reconsider the amount of water you’ve added.If you’re using baking soda, take care that you’ve added at least one sour ingredient (e.g. buttermilk).By now, it’s hopefully clear that you do have a lot of creative freedoms when making scones.This ensures an even distribution of the fat and the creation of those buttery pockets.Top left : substitutes milk for water, a little bland in color, but identical taste-wise.Bottom two : contain twice the amount of butter, turned out more like cookies than scones! .

Why Are My Scones Dry? (3 Common Reasons)

Why Are My Scones Dry? (3 Common Reasons)

Why Are My Scones Dry? (3 Common Reasons)

If you click one of these links and make a purchase, I may earn a commission at no additional cost to you.Scones are tasty pastries that most people enjoy alongside hot beverages.They’re traditional pastries in the United Kingdom, but they’ve become quite popular around the world as well.One of the biggest problems that can cause scones to turn out dry involves kneading the dough more than you’re supposed to.In fact, many scone aficionados suggest simply turning the dough over a bit with a spatula and then calling it good.It’s very easy to go overboard when mixing the dough for scones, and you’ll likely need to pay close attention due to how powerful most electric mixers are.Failing to add the butter at the right time could make it so that the scones will turn out dry.The gluten is going to form barriers that will impact how the scones will turn out if you don’t do things just right.If you don’t pay attention and do things in the wrong order, then you won’t get good results.The butter needs to be added to the flour first, and then you need to follow the next steps of the recipe in order.There is a specific sequence of events that needs to play out properly or you’ll wind up with less than stellar scones.Scones are a different type of pastry, and they aren’t supposed to taste or feel like cookies.It helps to puff the scones up, and you want to use the exact amount that is called for in the recipe that you’re using.If your recipe calls for baking soda, then it’s likely that you’ll need to use buttermilk instead of standard milk.So long as you’re paying attention to the things that you need to do, it’ll be possible to get good results when making scones.Enjoy your tasty homemade scones by inviting some of your closest friends and family over for coffee sometime soon. .

Making Scones: Tips and Troubleshooting Problems

Making Scones: Tips and Troubleshooting Problems

Making Scones: Tips and Troubleshooting Problems

Like all baked goods, a lot can go wrong at each step, throwing your recipe into a tailspin.If you're adding fruit, chocolate or other sweet ingredients to a basic scone recipe, use less sugar.If you're making scones with ingredients like canned pumpkin or mashed banana, use less buttermilk than you would normally use.Just press it into the mixture, cutting the butter as you go and wiping the cutter clean of dough with your hand as needed.If you're using frozen fruit, and add it at the last minute (just before you cut the scones) to prevent its juices from melting before it gets into the heat of the oven.Once your dough is crumbly, you can freeze it in a sealed plastic bag until you're almost ready to bake it.This is a good way to prepare scones for busy holidays and large events.For pink scones (for events like Valentine's Day or a birthday party), puree raspberries and use them as a portion of your liquid ingredients.Move a chunk of dough from the mixing bowl to a floured cutting board.If the dough is too crumbly when you place it on the cutting board, add slightly more buttermilk.If the dough is too sticky when you put it on the cutting board, add more flour.Optional: If you have remaining flour dregs, you can add a very small amount of buttermilk to them and use them as additional dough. .

The Best Scones {Buttery, Flaky and Crumbly}

The Best Scones {Buttery, Flaky and Crumbly}

The Best Scones {Buttery, Flaky and Crumbly}

If you’ve been trying to master the perfect scone and found that it’s a bit trickier than you’d expected, then this post is for you.Seriously, I’ve tried more scone recipes than I can count, only to be disappointed to have them bake up bland, dry, or worse, tough as bricks that it would have been better used as a meat pounder.What could be so hard about rubbing butter into flour, stirring in the liquids, rolling out the dough , and cutting rounds, right?So not one to give up easily, I learnt everything I could about scones, persevered, and ended up with this winning recipe that might just be life-changing.Because there’s a higher butter, cream and milk ratio to flour, these scones have an extra moist crumb and rich buttery flavour.I’ve made it many times over and it’s absolutely the best scones recipe by a mile.Even my English friends who’ve turned up their noses at the quality of scones in the shops gave these home-baked ones two thumbs up.“I wouldn’t mind having a second serve of that”, they piped, meaning these scones were delicious.You really don’t need any equipment if you’re happy to leave the stand mixer, roll up your sleeves and energize those arm muscles mixing everything by hand.Scones are super easy to freeze (I’ve got make-ahead options covered further down this post), and make an easy meal with a quick thaw and toast in the oven when you don’t have the time or energy to prep a stove-top breakfast.Plus, I’ve got a couple of handy tips through lessons learnt from (in)experience to ensure you’ll enjoy your best homemade scones.Cut cold butter and liquids into the flour mixture with a pastry cutter or wooden spoon, mixing until you get a rough dough that barely holds together.When well mixed, the baking powder gets well distributed in the flour so you’ll get a better chance of scones rising evenly.Scones cut from a thin dough tend to bake up with short sides and slightly domed tops (think cupcakes – not what we want, people).You’ll have an easier time dropping the scones (without touching their sides) directly onto the baking tray.Touching or smearing the sides effectively ‘seals’ the flaky layers, so your scones won’t rise evenly and may end up lop-sided.Once you’ve cut your rounds, flip them over and place them upside down on the baking tray.Don’t leave the remaining dough or trays with cut rounds waiting to go in the oven, out for too long when you’re baking in batches.Salt accentuates the flavours of other ingredients, without which the scones would taste pretty flat.Salt accentuates the flavours of other ingredients, without which the scones would taste pretty flat.The fats in heavy cream gives these scones an added richness and moistness.The fats in heavy cream gives these scones an added richness and moistness.You can switch out raisins for your favourite add-ins like dried currants, cranberries, mixed fruit or flavoured chips.Cut the cold butter cubes (or paddle with a stand mixer at low speed) into the flour until it resembles a coarse sandy mixture.Gently cut into the flour mixture with a pastry cutter or mix with a wooden spoon until just combined and no dryness remains.Dip a 2.5” (5 cm) cutter generously in flour and cut straight down into the dough (DO NOT TWIST).Bake immediately on the centre rack in the preheated oven for 22 – 25 minutes until they’ve risen, turned golden brown on their tops and bottoms, and spring back when lightly pressed.Pull out the number of pieces you need from the freezer bag, unwrap and pop into the microwave for a few seconds on a defrost setting.Follow the recipe steps to make the dough (if including raisins, after folding them in) until you’ve got it patted down or rolled to the ideal thickness.Scones are traditionally eaten with a generous spread of jam and clotted cream, as the English would have it, but I love turning them into savoury bites just as much.They’re perfect for sandwiching smoked salmon, egg mayo salad, ham and cheese – heck, just about anything.Cut the cold butter cubes into the flour mixture with a pastry cutter or wooden spoon (or paddle the butter into the flour at low speed) until it resembles a coarse sandy mixture.Gently cut into the flour mixture with a pastry cutter or mix with a wooden spoon until just combined and no dryness remains.Note: If the dough is too dry and crumbly, cut in a bit more milk, 2 -3 tsp at a time.Dip a 2.5”/5 cm cutter generously in flour and cut straight down into the dough (DO NOT TWIST).Bake the scones immediately on the center rack in the preheated oven, 22 – 25 minutes for 2.5” (5 cm) rounds.Note: If waiting turns for the oven, place the tray(s) of cut rounds and any leftover dough in the chiller.The scones are done when they have risen, turned golden brown on their tops and bottoms, and spring back when lightly pressed.Best eaten on the same day, and slightly warm with your favourite jam and whipped (or clotted) cream.The recipe remains unchanged, but scaled down to make a smaller batch intended to meet the needs of home bakers. .

3 Ways to Troubleshoot Scones That Won't Rise

3 Ways to Troubleshoot Scones That Won't Rise

3 Ways to Troubleshoot Scones That Won't Rise

wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards.If it's too dry, your scones won't rise properly, so tweak the ingredient proportions as needed. .

Foolproof Scone Recipe

Foolproof Scone Recipe

Foolproof Scone Recipe

Today I’ll be sharing everything you need to know to make traditional, plain scones.A flaky, crisp exterior exposes a tender, buttery soft interior that melts away in your mouth.I’ll take you through my Foolproof Scone Recipe, a myriad of tips and step-by-step photos so that you can master them too.As a bonus, I’ve also provided notes on how to make a Small-Batch Scone Recipe too (to be found in the FAQ section).The delightful English scone has graced the plates for afternoon tea in kitchens for years.If you love an afternoon snack then you'll enjoy my Cherry Almond Scones, Chocolate Hazelnut Granola Bars or Lemon Poppy Seed Madeleines.Flour, butter, egg and milk make up the core ingredients of these scones and you're most likely going to have them in your kitchen.Flour, butter, egg and milk make up the core ingredients of these scones and you're most likely going to have them in your kitchen.Served alongside a cup of tea these make the perfect afternoon snack.Self-raising flour - Part of the success of making scones lies in the height that they rise.- Part of the success of making scones lies in the height that they rise.- Salt adds depth to the flavour and the extra baking powder helps create a little more lift.- I prefer full-fat milk due to the higher fat content which adds more richness to the dough.Unsalted butter - Has to be cold in order to create flaky layers within the scone.Into a large mixing bowl, sift in your dry ingredients; flour, baking powder and salt.If your kitchen is warm then measure out your ingredients and refrigerate them all for half an hour (mixing bowl included) before you crack on with the method.If you have warm hands, run them under cold water to reduce their temperature, then pat dry before handling the butter.Now rub the remaining cubes of butter into the flour but this time leave them larger until they are the size of peas.Tip the scone mix onto a lightly floured surface and using your hands, bring it together and gently flatten it out.We're going to use a folding technique to create flaky layers and incorporate air into the dough and minimise kneading.Dip a 6 cm (21⁄4-inch) cookie cutter in flour and stamp out 4 or 5 rounds.TIP: Dipping the cookie cutter in flour will help when cutting out the scones without them sticking.Note, that they won't rise quite as much as the first round, as you’ve worked the dough more than the first scones.TIP: If you forgot to set aside some egg wash, don't worry - brush the tops with milk.To change things up scones are delightful when served with other types of condiments such as lemon curd, blackberry jam and even a pear & ginger compote.Make a simple glaze of powdered icing sugar with a little citrus juice to drizzle on top of the scone for extra flavour.Make a simple glaze of powdered icing sugar with a little citrus juice to drizzle on top of the scone for extra flavour.: Any dried fruit such as sultanas, raisins, cranberries or chopped apricots are a wonderful addition.Berries : Frozen or fresh strawberries, blueberries or raspberries can add the perfect fruity kick.: Frozen or fresh strawberries, blueberries or raspberries can add the perfect fruity kick.Savoury: Add cheese, herbs or even crispy bacon pieces for the perfect accompaniment to your meal.The aim is to keep the butter as cold as possible when making the dough so that it melts when it hits the high heat, not before, and creates that uber flakey interior we're after.This prevents the activation of gluten and in turn, tough scones when baked.This allows the flour to hydrate, the gluten to relax, butter to re-chill and harden and baking powder to get to work.Add enough moisture to the dough so it feels slightly wet and sticky when you turn it out.I believe scones benefit from the egg as it binds the ingredients, adds flavour but also acts as a leavener and aids in the rise, leading to increased fluffiness.For the standard size recipe above, add 3 teaspoons of baking powder to 375g/3 cups plain (all-purpose) flour and stir together.Continue as per the recipe instructions and the other ingredients, including the stated baking powder.My pro tips cover what I believe to be foolproof techniques to make incredible scones.Don't forget to subscribe to the newsletter, so that you don’t miss out on more delicious food, tips and news but also the chance to download your FREE DESSERT E-BOOK! .

A Scone Is Not a Biscuit - Bon Appétit

A Scone Is Not a Biscuit - Bon Appétit

A Scone Is Not a Biscuit - Bon Appétit

There was coffee and pastries in the morning, a manageable sandwich selection at lunch, and a navigable dinner menu.Theoretically it was the perfect spot to cozy up with a scone and a pot of tea on a "sick" day.Sure, they're made up of almost the same stuff—flour, leavener, fat, dairy—but they are two altogether different things and you better not try to trick me into thinking one is the other.Tender, yes, but sturdy enough to support or be dragged through gravy, a runny egg yolk, or a generous serving of maple syrup.A scone's finer crumb welcomes an addition, be it herbs, chocolate, or a simple handful of currants.Would you want to eat that poor burned raisin hanging off a biscuit cliff for dear life?So when Test Kitchen contributor Jess Damuck set out to develop a perfect scone recipe, I was watching.Tender, just crumbly enough, ready, able, and yielding to a number of delicious additions. .

The BEST Scone Recipe

The BEST Scone Recipe

The BEST Scone Recipe

Learn how to make delicious, soft, light, and tender scones with this easy tutorial.But the truth is that when made correctly, scones are actually super soft, light, and can melt in your mouth!So today I’m bringing it back to the basics and showing you exactly how to make homemade scones.Too much flour can lead to a crumbly dough and scones that don’t taste as good.Too much flour can lead to a crumbly dough and scones that don’t taste as good.A little cream brushed on top of the scones before they go into the oven creates a beautiful slightly crisp and lightly browned exterior too.When it comes to soft scones that don’t dry out, heavy whipping cream is the best option.A little cream brushed on top of the scones before they go into the oven creates a beautiful slightly crisp and lightly browned exterior too.Next, whisk together the heavy whipping cream, egg, and vanilla extract until well combined.Then, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, work it into a ball, flatten it into a disc 7 inches in diameter, and cut it into 8 equal-sized pieces.Once it’s nice and cold, brush the tops of the scones with a little heavy whipping cream.Add 1 and 1/2 teaspoons of ground cinnamon and 2/3 cup of raisins Lemon Poppy Seed: Add the zest of 1 medium lemon and 1/2 tablespoon of poppy seeds You can also find my chocolate chip scone recipe here and my apple cinnamon scones here. .

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