How Did The Snickerdoodle Cookie Get Its Name
Snickerdoodle

How Did The Snickerdoodle Cookie Get Its Name

  • January 14, 2022

My first — very uneducated — guess was it had a common origin with another sweet treat — Snickers, a candy bar I adore.(Side note: My little brother and I got in huge trouble when we were young kids after we stole Snickers and Milky Ways from my diabetic grandmother and ate them in her bathroom.We learned a big lesson that day: Never dispose of the evidence — wrappers — in your victim’s wastebasket.).The dictionary suggested the word could be a compound of “snicker” (“a smothered laugh; a snigger”) and “doodle” (“a silly or foolish fellow; a noodle”) which left me more confused than before.Their name may be a corruption of the German word ‘Schneckennudeln,’ which translates roughly as ‘crinkly noodles.“Good snickerdoodles are light and pillowy, with a sweet tangy overall flavor, and a glistening cinnamon crust.My wife makes great snickerdoodles from the Better Homes & Gardens cookbook — all you need is butter, sugar, baking soda cream of tartar, an egg, vanilla, flour, cinnamon and an appetite.If you think you have the best (or even a decent) snickerdoodle recipe, please bring a plate of the heavenly cookies by our office at 400 West Sunnyside in Idaho Falls, and we will eat them gone. .

Snickerdoodle

Snickerdoodle

Snickerdoodle

The cookie is common to Mennonite and Amish communities and was a favorite treat of the Indiana poet, James Whitcomb Riley.In more recent times, the snickerdoodle cookie has transformed into a popular flavor of desserts, sweets, drinks, etc.For example, General Mills created a snickerdoodle flavored Chex Mix Muddy Buddies to their snack line.[7] In addition to a snickerdoodle latte, Nestlé Coffee-Mate introduced their take on the cookie in the form of a coffee creamer. .

The Sweet Story of Snickerdoodle Cookies - Grit

The Sweet Story of Snickerdoodle Cookies - Grit

The Sweet Story of Snickerdoodle Cookies - Grit

The snickerdoodle cookie has been around a long time and the basic recipe varies little.However, there are some definite tips and tricks to making the perfect snickerdoodle with crispy edges and a soft middle.Depending on who you believe, the snickerdoodle came from Germany, or is Dutch in origin, or perhaps got its start in New England.But in many ways, the basic recipe IS the best cookie, with some minor variations that involve tricks more than ingredients.1: The texture of your cookies will benefit greatly from hand mixing the dough, as opposed to beating with a mixer.Not only is it easier to mix the butter by hand when it’s soft, but having these ingredients at room temperature also benefits the final cookie texture.After you’ve mixed the shortening and butter, add the sugar and cream further.In separate bowl, mix the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt.Shape dough into rounded teaspoons – I make mine a little bit larger because we like big cookies – and shake balls lightly in plastic bag with sugar/cinnamon mixture.I use parchment paper and airbake cookie sheets for the most even baking.I baked mine 6-1/2 minutes for a soft middle; be sure this timeframe suits your oven temperature.Snickerdoodles store well in airtight containers at room temperature. .

Here's How Snickerdoodles May Have Got Their Name

Here's How Snickerdoodles May Have Got Their Name

Here's How Snickerdoodles May Have Got Their Name

Another idea, less snail-related, but not necessarily spot on, is that snickerdoodles come from the Dutch word snekrad which vaguely translates to snicker.Then, of course, in an article by East Ohio News, the outlet suggests that schneckennudeln might actually be a compound word, mixing snicker and doodle and essentially meaning "crinkly noodle.". .

Snickerdoodles: What's in a Name? — Adventures in Taste and Time

Snickerdoodles: What's in a Name? — Adventures in Taste and Time

Snickerdoodles: What's in a Name? — Adventures in Taste and Time

Snickerdoodles are the perfect children’s treat; a tender cookie with a slight tang, covered in cinnamon sugar and baring a very silly name.(Side note: If you have time and access to the Online OED, listening to the British and American pronunciations of snickerdoodle, alternatingly, is deeply entertaining.). .

Snickerdoodle Cookies, Explained: The History of This Classic Treat

Snickerdoodle Cookies, Explained: The History of This Classic Treat

Snickerdoodle Cookies, Explained: The History of This Classic Treat

The crinkly-topped, chewy, old-fashioned favorites are not the most impressive looking cookies—post one on your social media feed and you're not likely to get hundreds of likes—but if you set aside an hour or so to bake a batch of snickerdoodles, you will get a taste of dessert history.Purists believe the cream of tartar is key to the snickerdoodle's chewy texture and its delightful, slightly tangy taste.Cream of tartar activates the baking soda and keeps sugar crystals from forming, so the cookies end up pillowy rather than crisp.You'll find recipes for snickerdoodle cupcakes, coffee cakes, pies, tarts, ice creams, puddings, lattes, and beyond. .

Tracing the History of the Snickerdoodle

Tracing the History of the Snickerdoodle

Tracing the History of the Snickerdoodle

“Snickerdoodles” are drop cookies topped with cinnamon sugar that are cited in print from at least 1889.My favorite always goes back to the Betty Crocker (recipe below) method.They are so easy to put together and always bake up golden and crackly – and store quite wonderfully for several days.I often double the recipe, preparing all of the cookies, and then freezing half.There a many recipes for this “strangely” named tasty cookie, and many preferences for their texture.Whether you like your snickerdoodles soft, crisp or a combination of both, this petite cinnamon dusted delight is treasured by all ages.Mix 1 1/2 cups sugar, the butter, shortening and eggs in large bowl.Stir in flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt.When the cookies just begin to form cracks and thier color is a light brown, I remove them.Update: After viewing this recipe at Dine & Dish, I remembered doing this post and wanted to go back and check the difference between my favorite recipe and the Mrs. Siggs recipe – I realized the only difference was the sugar at the end – Mrs.

Siggs calls for 3 tablespoons, while the Betty Crocker calls for 1/4 cup, i.e. 4 Tablespoons… I actually prefer more cinnamon taste, so I will be going with Mrs. Siggs from now on! .

Snickerdoodle Definition & Meaning

Snickerdoodle Definition & Meaning

Snickerdoodle Definition & Meaning

Note: An alternative etymology derives the word from Palatinate German dialect Schneckennudel, Scheckennurel, Schleckenurrl "sweet pastry made from yeast dough twisted into a spiral" (from Schnecken "snail" and Nudel "dough in various forms"), with variants in other dialects (Baden, Swabia, Saarland). .

Soft and Chewy Snickerdoodles

Soft and Chewy Snickerdoodles

Soft and Chewy Snickerdoodles

They are super soft and chewy with a gorgeous crinkly topping perfect for holding in pockets of delicious cinnamon.They puff in the oven and then settle back down while cooling into a soft, thick, supremely chewy cookie with a gorgeous crinkly top.The cookies have also been called snipdoodles or cinnamon sugar cookies, but no direct German translation seems to make sense, so it may just be a little bit of a whimsical spin on a couple of different words.Some think of snickerdoodles as simply drop sugar cookies that have been rolled in cinnamon-sugar, but this oversimplification is far from accurate.Also because it’s an acid, it helps to create a more tender texture, keeping the cookies both soft and chewy, which is a texture combination you don’t find in traditional sugar cookies.– I recommend using parchment paper to line the pans to eliminate any possibility of the cookies spreading.Cream of Tartar – This is a key ingredient in snickerdoodles, but if you find yourself in a serious pinch, you can use 2 teaspoons baking powder and omit BOTH the cream of tartar AND the baking soda.Make-Ahead – You can prepare the dough and store it, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days before scooping and baking.– You can prepare the dough and store it, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days before scooping and baking.They are super soft and chewy with a gorgeous crinkly topping perfect for holding in pockets of delicious cinnamon.Whisk together the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.Scoop 1-inch balls of dough and roll in the cinnamon and sugar mixture to coat.Place on chilled cookie sheet about 2 inches apart and bake for 10 minutes.Let cookies set on baking sheet for 2-3 minutes and then remove to a cooling rack.- I recommend using parchment paper to line the pans to eliminate any possibility of the cookies spreading.Cream of Tartar - This is a key ingredient in snickerdoodles, but if you find yourself in a serious pinch, you can use 2 teaspoons baking powder and omit BOTH the cream of tartar AND the baking soda.Make-Ahead - You can prepare the dough and store it, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days before scooping and baking.- You can prepare the dough and store it, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days before scooping and baking.Leave a review below, then snap a picture and tag @thebrowneyedbaker on Instagram so I can see it!Originally published in 2009, this has been updated to include new photos and more in-depth recipe tips. .

My Best Snickerdoodle Recipe » Hummingbird High

My Best Snickerdoodle Recipe » Hummingbird High

My Best Snickerdoodle Recipe » Hummingbird High

When I wrote my cookbook, Weeknight Baking, my goal was to build a collection of recipes that were timeless.I avoided baked goods with trendy flavors like spirulina or activated charcoal.I figured that was these were the types of baked goods that people were craving at home on a weeknight.Meanwhile, Stella Parks, one of my all-time baking heroes, writes in her cookbook that snickerdoodles evolved from a popular cinnamon-scented cake recipe called the “snip doodle”.A classic snickerdoodle should taste like a sugar cookie, but a little bit tangier from the cream of tartar.When developing the snickerdoodle recipe for Weeknight Baking, I had the brilliant idea to swap out the cinnamon for other spices.When measuring out the cinnamon for the snickerdoodle topping, you might be shocked by how much it is and be tempted to the scale the quantity back before even trying it.I’ve already talked about how snickerdoodles are basically just sugar cookies that use cream of tartar instead of traditional baking powder.Snickerdoodle recipes were used in national advertisements for Cleveland Baking Powder as early as 1891.Store cream of tartar in a cool, dry place and always give it a quick look and a sniff before using it.In addition to flavor, using cream of tartar gives snickerdoodles their signature appearance with pronounced cracks and crags on the surface of each cookie.It’s worth sourcing the stuff (it’s available at most supermarkets in the herbs section), especially since it pretty much keeps indefinitely in the pantry.In addition to having an effect on flavor, skipping the cream of tartar would also result in different textured cookies.In theory, you can substitute the cream of tartar with other ingredients like baking powder, lemon, and vinegar.That being said, I did have a handful of Instagram followers and Patreon supporters who substituted the cream of tartar with its equivalent in lemon juice and/or vinegar.When making snickerdoodles, I like to use on high-quality butter to stand up to the strong cinnamon sugar flavor.Not to mention that this cookie recipe uses a fair amount of butter too—as a result, you can really taste it!First, cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy, then add the eggs, vanilla, and finally, the dry ingredients.Each cookie will need to be rolled in the cinnamon sugar snickerdoodle topping before baking.Roll the Cookie Dough Balls in the Snickerdoodle Cinnamon Sugar Topping (Work Time: <5 minutes).Once the cookie dough balls have been formed, roll each one in a shallow bowl with the cinnamon sugar topping.This is to encourage the leaveners to activate really quickly, puffing the centers of the cookies as they bake.When pulled out of the oven, the centers then fall, giving each snickerdoodle cookie its signature crispy edges.When ready to bake, you’ll need to roll the cookie dough balls in the snickerdoodle topping.I love freezing baked snickerdoodle cookies and snacking on them (while still cold from the freezer!).For softer cookies, thaw them overnight in the refrigerator, then for a few hours at room temperature before serving.First, test the cream of tartar by adding a pinch to a bowl of hot water.Figure out if it’s your baking soda by pinching a small amount into a bowl and adding a splash of vinegar.Hang the thermometer on one of the center oven racks to monitor the temperature inside.To wit—many years ago, when I still lived in San Francisco, I rented an apartment with a faulty oven.The residual heat from the pan will continue to bake the cookies to the perfect texture.The pan will continue to bake them even after you pull them out of the oven, leading to hard and overdone cookies.I think their craggy surfaces are beautiful, and I love the way that their cracks hold cinnamon sugar.There are two ways to make this snickerdoodle cookie recipe small batch.½ cup (4 ounces or 114 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature.I like to save the leftovers in an airtight container to sprinkle on my breakfast oatmeal and toast throughout the rest of the week—I wouldn’t keep it any longer than that though (because I mean… you did roll raw cookie dough in the stuff, lol).I find that doing so makes the best cookies, ensuring that none of them have overly burnt bottoms or raw centers.2 Tablespoons ground cinnamon For the Snickerdoodle Cookie Dough 2 ¾ cups (12.35 ounces or 350 grams) all-purpose flour.2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract Instructions For the Snickerdoodle Cookies Prep the oven and pans.Whisk together ¼ cup (1.75 ounces) granulated sugar and the ground cinnamon in a shallow bowl.In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, and salt.In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment , combine the sugar and butter.Beat on medium-high speed until light, fluffy, and doubled in volume, 2 to 3 minutes, using a rubber spatula to scrape down the bottom and sides of the bowl as necessary.With the mixer on low, gradually add the dry ingredients and beat until just combined.Scrape down the bottom and sides of the bowl once more, and beat on low for an additional 30 seconds.Place the coated cookies at least 3 inches apart on the prepared sheet pans.Bake one pan at a time for 10 minutes, or until the edges have set but the centers are still gooey.The cookies can be stored in an airtight container or zip-top bag at room temperature for up to 3 days. .

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