Where Did Name Snickerdoodle Come From
Snickerdoodle

Where Did Name Snickerdoodle Come From

  • May 10, 2022

My first — very uneducated — guess was it had a common origin with another sweet treat — Snickers, a candy bar I adore.(Side note: My little brother and I got in huge trouble when we were young kids after we stole Snickers and Milky Ways from my diabetic grandmother and ate them in her bathroom.We learned a big lesson that day: Never dispose of the evidence — wrappers — in your victim’s wastebasket.).The dictionary suggested the word could be a compound of “snicker” (“a smothered laugh; a snigger”) and “doodle” (“a silly or foolish fellow; a noodle”) which left me more confused than before.Their name may be a corruption of the German word ‘Schneckennudeln,’ which translates roughly as ‘crinkly noodles.“Good snickerdoodles are light and pillowy, with a sweet tangy overall flavor, and a glistening cinnamon crust.My wife makes great snickerdoodles from the Better Homes & Gardens cookbook — all you need is butter, sugar, baking soda cream of tartar, an egg, vanilla, flour, cinnamon and an appetite.If you think you have the best (or even a decent) snickerdoodle recipe, please bring a plate of the heavenly cookies by our office at 400 West Sunnyside in Idaho Falls, and we will eat them gone. .

Snickerdoodle

Snickerdoodle

Snickerdoodle

The cookie is common to Mennonite and Amish communities and was a favorite treat of the Indiana poet, James Whitcomb Riley.In more recent times, the snickerdoodle cookie has transformed into a popular flavor of desserts, sweets, drinks, etc.For example, General Mills created a snickerdoodle flavored Chex Mix Muddy Buddies to their snack line.[7] In addition to a snickerdoodle latte, Nestlé Coffee-Mate introduced their take on the cookie in the form of a coffee creamer. .

Snickerdoodles: What's in a Name? — Adventures in Taste and Time

Snickerdoodles: What's in a Name? — Adventures in Taste and Time

Snickerdoodles: What's in a Name? — Adventures in Taste and Time

Snickerdoodles are the perfect children’s treat; a tender cookie with a slight tang, covered in cinnamon sugar and baring a very silly name.(Side note: If you have time and access to the Online OED, listening to the British and American pronunciations of snickerdoodle, alternatingly, is deeply entertaining.). .

The Sweet Story of Snickerdoodle Cookies

The Sweet Story of Snickerdoodle Cookies

The Sweet Story of Snickerdoodle Cookies

Depending on who you believe, the snickerdoodle came from Germany, or is Dutch in origin, or perhaps got its start in New England.But in many ways, the basic recipe IS the best cookie, with some minor variations that involve tricks more than ingredients.1: The texture of your cookies will benefit greatly from hand mixing the dough, as opposed to beating with a mixer.Not only is it easier to mix the butter by hand when it’s soft, but having these ingredients at room temperature also benefits the final cookie texture.After you’ve mixed the shortening and butter, add the sugar and cream further.In separate bowl, mix the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt.Mix the sugar and cinnamon in a small plastic bag.Shape dough into rounded teaspoons – I make mine a little bit larger because we like big cookies – and shake balls lightly in plastic bag with sugar/cinnamon mixture.I use parchment paper and airbake cookie sheets for the most even baking.I baked mine 6-1/2 minutes for a soft middle; be sure this timeframe suits your oven temperature.Snickerdoodles store well in airtight containers at room temperature. .

Here's How Snickerdoodles May Have Got Their Name

Here's How Snickerdoodles May Have Got Their Name

Here's How Snickerdoodles May Have Got Their Name

Another idea, less snail-related, but not necessarily spot on, is that snickerdoodles come from the Dutch word snekrad which vaguely translates to snicker.Then, of course, in an article by East Ohio News, the outlet suggests that schneckennudeln might actually be a compound word, mixing snicker and doodle and essentially meaning "crinkly noodle.". .

Snickerdoodle Definition & Meaning

Snickerdoodle Definition & Meaning

Snickerdoodle Definition & Meaning

Note: An alternative etymology derives the word from Palatinate German dialect Schneckennudel, Scheckennurel, Schleckenurrl "sweet pastry made from yeast dough twisted into a spiral" (from Schnecken "snail" and Nudel "dough in various forms"), with variants in other dialects (Baden, Swabia, Saarland). .

What Is a Snickerdoodle, and What Makes This Classic American

What Is a Snickerdoodle, and What Makes This Classic American

What Is a Snickerdoodle, and What Makes This Classic American

The crinkly-topped, chewy, old-fashioned favorites are not the most impressive looking cookies—post one on your social media feed and you're not likely to get hundreds of likes—but if you set aside an hour or so to bake a batch of snickerdoodles, you will get a taste of dessert history.Purists believe the cream of tartar is key to the snickerdoodle's chewy texture and its delightful, slightly tangy taste.Cream of tartar activates the baking soda and keeps sugar crystals from forming, so the cookies end up pillowy rather than crisp.You'll find recipes for snickerdoodle cupcakes, coffee cakes, pies, tarts, ice creams, puddings, lattes, and beyond. .

Classic Soft & Chewy Snickerdoodle Cookies

Classic Soft & Chewy Snickerdoodle Cookies

Classic Soft & Chewy Snickerdoodle Cookies

When I think of snickerdoodles, I always think of my dad, snapping up a cookie still warm off the rack as he passed through our kitchen on his way outside.While Snickerdoodles do have the same basic ingredient list as a cinnamon roll, there are some glaring differences; namely, one is a formed pastry, and the other is a cookie.This corruption seems vague at best, and Germans tend to be international champs when it comes to simultaneously infusing specificity and nuance into a single noun.There are a handful of additional etymological theories about where the name snickerdoodle came from, most with ties to Scotland and England, but none are particularly compelling.Instead, I prefer the theory that speaks to me best: that snickerdoodle is just bit of whimsy, conjured by some witty bygone baker in a cinnamon-filled, sunlit kitchen.(I tend to be a little freewheeling when it comes to measuring ingredients, so I use "scant" in this recipe to remind myself not to heap the cup.).(I tend to be a little freewheeling when it comes to measuring ingredients, so I use "scant" in this recipe to remind myself not to heap the cup.).This recipe uses a standard Creaming Method to mix the dough: sift the dry ingredients, cream the butter and sugars, add the liquids; and finally, add the dry ingredients to the wet.Sift flour, baking soda, cream of tartar, salt and cinnamon into a medium bowl and set aside.In a small bowl, combine topping ingredients: ¼ cup granulated sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon.Add vanilla, and beat in eggs one at a time, scraping the bowl as necessary until completely incorporated.At this point, you can bake the cookies immediately, or put them in the fridge for a few hours to chill.Snickerdoodles (the cake) were a regular staple on local school and summer camp menus.When it comes to baking snickerdoodles, a minute or two one way or the other can make the difference between raw dough and soft, chewy perfection.Snickerdoodle cookies typically rise up to a smooth flat dome shape, and then fall and wrinkle slightly after being removed from the oven.For soft, chewy snickerdoodle cookies , set oven to 325°F | 162°C, and bake chilled dough balls for 10-12 minutes.For slightly more crunchy snickerdoodles, raise the oven temp to 350°F | 176°C, and bake 12-14 minutes.You can bake these Snickerdoodles immediately after you mix them up, or put the dough in the fridge and chill it for a few hours.Baking the dough immediately yields a slightly wider, flatter cookie, and the texture is a bit more dense.In the case of snickerdoodles, Cream of Tartar’s main job is to activate the baking soda.Shape and roll individual cookies in cinnamon-sugar mixture, then transfer them to an airtight container or freezer bag.For more recipes and cozy living tips, subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on Instagram, Pinterest, and Facebook for all of the latest updates.Line a baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment paper and set aside.Sift flour, baking soda, cream of tartar, salt and cinnamon into a medium bowl and set aside.In a small bowl, combine topping ingredients: ¼ cup granulated sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon.Notes For soft, chewy snickerdoodle cookies, set oven to 325°F | 162°C, and bake chilled dough balls for 10-12 minutes.For slightly more crunchy snickerdoodles, raise the oven temp to 350°F | 176°C, and bake 12-14 minutes.You are solely responsible for ensuring that any nutritional information provided is accurate, complete, and useful.While clicking these links won't cost you any extra money, they do help keep this site up and running. .

Leave a Reply

Your email adress will not be published ,Requied fileds are marked*.