Best Egg Custard Tart Near Me
Tart

Best Egg Custard Tart Near Me

  • October 14, 2021

I don't normally drive all the way from Sacramento to SF just for food...but this place is definitely worth it. .

The Best Chinese Bakery Sweets in Manhattan's Chinatown

The Best Chinese Bakery Sweets in Manhattan's Chinatown

The Best Chinese Bakery Sweets in Manhattan's Chinatown

On my daily commute, I'd walk past no fewer than six bakeries and wonder: which ones were worth my time, and what should I get there?Chinese bakeries focus on single-serving pastries: small tarts, slices of Swiss roll cake, and buns with fillings like red bean, roast pork, taro, cream, salted egg yolk, and beyond.Buns and cakes go for light, puffy textures with neat crumbs and a cake-like creaminess.And take note that bakeries usually close in the early evening, so if you want a post-dinner sweet bite, you may be out of luck.That said, there are a few critical warning signs to watch out for, like dry or pale-looking buns or sesame balls with sunken spots.A quick squeeze of your bun with the provided tongs will give you a sense of freshness.Lastly, don't expect great customer service from most bakeries in Chinatown (even if you're Chinese).The one exception we found was Manna House Bakery on Mott Street, where the warm staff traded jokes with us and gave us the most pleasant customer service experience in the neighborhood.Our two favorite bakeries were, some what unsurprisingly, the largest: chains Tai Pan and Fay Da, with dozens of locations around the city.The Chinatown storefronts bake their buns onsite, and almost all of the sweets we tried from both ranked high, if not exceptional.They also bake throughout the day, so even though we timed our bakery runs for the morning, their freshness stood out.Lung Moon had our favorite pineapple topping: sweet, crunchy, and crumbly, and once the bun was gone we found ourselves scraping the bottom of the bag for all the chunks of crust that fell off.Tai Pan won this category with ease; literally all the other buns we tried were dry and stale.Though you'd assume one bakery's plain bun dough would be the same regardless of filling, we found this not to be the case in practice.The red bean filling here is flavorful but not too beany, and its freshness made for an easy win.Note that these usually come prepackaged in plastic sacks, so you can check if your bun is still soft with a light squeeze.It's time for some real talk: we don't care for any of the baked roast pork buns in Chinatown.These baked buns glazed with syrup and filled with sweet and porky char siu, barbecue roast pork, should be a crowd pleaser, but almost every version in Chinatown falls short of truly satisfying.Yes, we tried Mei Li Wah's famous rendition and all the other crowd favorites, but too often we found gooey-sweet filling, gross gobs of fat, or stringy meat in stale bread.Take the moist-but-not-too-fatty chunks of roast pork from Tai Pan, add the flavorful barbecue sauce from Golden Steamer, and bake it all in the impressively moist bread from Hop Shing.The success of Fay Da's bun lies in the balanced contrast of meaty hot dog and mildly sweet bread.Fay Da's is bright purple and sweetened like frosting, encased inside a moist bread with a tight crumb.It's dense, even heavy, and especially sweet, but a great pastry: Fay Da uses the same bright purple filling from their taro bun and wraps it in flaky pastry, which mostly serves as delivery device for the payload.That filling has subtle notes of vanilla and coconut, which has us craving an ice cream version.Golden Steamer's reputation for top-notch buns holds true in this category, but we also found some stellar ones at Manna House Bakery just down the street.As with the plain steamed buns, Golden Steamer and Manna House were the clear winners, with the latter beating the former by a hair.At Golden Steamer, the buns featured fluffy bread and a smooth, almost smoky filling.We had better success finding steamed roast pork buns than baked versions, with two solid renditions.The bun at Golden Steamer is a good pick, like the rest of their offerings, with moist meat and a sauce that has impressive depth of flavor.Delicious Bakery also made a strong showing with a nicely textured bread and a savory minced filling.Great Bakery makes the only baked version we could find, filled with squash enhanced by just a touch of sugar.On the sweeter end is Golden Steamer's excellent steamed version, which hews closer to dessert than afternoon snack.One of Golden Steamer's most unique offerings is also one of their best: a sweet bun filled with grated salted egg yolk custard.Sweet, nutty and rich lotus bean paste brings to mind peanut butter with less stickiness.It's common in mooncakes but rare in steamed buns, though Mei Li Wah offers one with a mellow nutty filling.The version at Tai Pan Bakery is just wonderful: sweet and delicately eggy custard with a buttery, shatteringly flaky crust, all in good balance and spotted a pleasant brown.We've already written extensively about our favorite sponge cake at the Kam Hing Coffee Shop, which is delightfully light, airy, barely sweet, and nicely eggy, always warm whenever you order it.For this project we gave some other bakeries a try, and while we found it's hard to make a bad sponge cake, a few do stand above the rest.Almost all bakeries make the plain variety, but if you're lucky, you can find some more interesting flavors: coffee, mango, and green tea.The frosting tasted of dairy and the cake was velvety, with just enough sweetness to counter the ample salt in the filling.The frosting here is more shortening-heavy, but the salty filling takes a backseat to the light coffee flavor of the cake itself.Avoid the plain roll cakes here, but if you like cafe au lait sweets, this is perfect.Traditionally, the flaky pastry surrounding the filling is made with lard, but some bakeries use shortening or butter instead, which, to be honest, is our preference.The pastry (with just a hint of lard) is crisp and flaky, and the filling is tender, not overly gummy.A dark horse favorite came from New York Mart, where the cakes are big enough to share and have a good balance of crust and filling.Mooncakes are dense, pudgy pucks of enriched dough stuffed with fillings like bean paste, lotus seed, and salted egg.But the lotus-bean-filled versions at Lung Moon are tasty enough to eat year-round: the crust is tender and thin, supple enough to protect the smooth, dense, and rich filling.Chinese mochi come in myriad flavors but share the same basic structure: a ball of soft, sticky rice dough with a sweet filling and a coating of crushed peanut or grated coconut.A few flavors: taro, mango, green tea, peanut, black sesame, and red bean.Tai Pan's mango mochi ranks as one of the best sweets across this entire tasting.The dumplings are filled with black sesame paste and usually served in hot, sweetened water, but at A-Wah you can request them without the broth.The dumplings, coated in crusted peanuts, have a warm sesame filling that oozes with every bite.They're a common find in grocery stores, but we had high hopes that samples from bakeries would be more fresh, as the ideal sachima should be soft with a faint crunch from the fried noodles and sweet with the slightest whiff of "fried" flavor.As it turned out, most of the bakery versions tasted primarily of fryer oil, but Lung Moon's were just like what I remember from childhood.Neither stale nor overly oily, these have crispy noodles and a sticky chew from the honey syrup coating them.Sesame seeds scattered throughout are a welcome addition, lending a light toasted flavor. .

Egg Custard Tarts

Egg Custard Tarts

Egg Custard Tarts

Inspired by The Great British Baking Show, I tried my hand at a classic Egg Custard Tart.Show Directions For pastry, stir the flour and ground almonds together in a large bowl, then add the butter and rub in with your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.Crack in the egg and mix it with your fingers until the mixture forms a soft dough.Roll out the sweet pastry on a lightly floured work surface.Using an 11cm/4½in fluted cutter, cut out twelve discs and line the muffin tray moulds with the pastry circle.For custard filling, warm the milk in a pot until steaming, but not simmering at all, and beat the egg yolks and sugar together in a separate bowl until pale and creamy.Pour the milk onto the egg yolk mixture and whisk well, creating little bubbles.The base of the tarts should be perfectly baked through, without having over-cooked the custard filling.This is one of those baking recipes that really shows your attention to detail I think (mine sucks, frankly).The sweet pastry dough ended up being nice and soft after I mixed in the egg.Then you pour in warm whole milk and whisk until it forms a froth.I think the next time I would raise them up a tiny bit more as I basically just made them level with the tins.The thing I failed to do was rotate my muffin tin halfway through baking.Three of my tarts were slightly underbaked and stuck a bit to the muffin tin.The custard didn’t seem overcooked to me and the tart shell was nice and crispy all around. .

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Using a floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a ½-inch-thick rectangle, 10 inches long.Remove the plastic wrap and roll the dough into a 15-inch square, dusting with more flour as needed.Spread half of the remaining butter on the bottom half of the dough, leaving a 1-inch rim.Spread the remaining butter all over the dough, leaving a 1-inch rim.In a medium saucepan, combine the sugar, water and cinnamon stick over high heat.Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, heat 1 cup, plus 1 tablespoon, of the milk over medium heat until bubbles begin to form around the edges, 4 to 5 minutes.In a large bowl, whisk the flour with the remaining 5 tablespoons of milk.Pour 1½ tablespoons of the warm filling into each pastry shells.Then, remove the molds, transfer the tarts to the wire racks and sprinkle with cinnamon. .

Hong Kong Egg Tarts (Chinese Dim Sum/Pastry)

Hong Kong Egg Tarts (Chinese Dim Sum/Pastry)

Hong Kong Egg Tarts (Chinese Dim Sum/Pastry)

We have since extensively re-tested the recipe, re-photographed it with more step-by-step photos, added clearer instructions, included metric measurements, and more.You’ll find these Chinese egg tarts in Hong Kong, Macau, China, and Chinatowns around the world.I’ve grown up eating them all my life, but it wasn’t until I moved to Beijing that I tasted one fresh out of the oven.Besides, here in the U.S., we don’t all have dim sum restaurants within reasonable traveling distance to get these, so it’s time to learn to make them from scratch like the best of ’em.Macau’s version was brought over by Portuguese colonizers, and they have more of a scorched, caramelized exterior, and a crispier rough puff pastry dough.(Check out our separate recipe for Portuguese Custard Tarts, or pasteis de nata.).The Hong Kong version was influenced by British custard tarts, which are more glassy and smooth, with a more delicately laminated flaky pastry.However, as I mentioned in the note at the top of this post, I have been re-testing it over the last couple months and have since made some significant improvements.This new and improved version is much more foolproof, yielding flaky, laminated layers of buttery pastry that melt in your mouth.In a bowl, combine the flour and salt, and leave your butter out at room temperature until just softened.(Basically, you want it to be soft enough to break up with your fingers, but it shouldn’t immediately form a paste with the flour.).Wrap the dough tightly in plastic or a reusable bag (we like Stashers), and refrigerate for 20 minutes.Note, if making these ahead, you can refrigerate the dough overnight and continue with the recipe the next day.Dissolve the sugar into 1 cup of hot water, and allow the mixture to cool to room temperature.Strain the custard through a fine meshed strainer into a large measuring cup or pitcher (something with a pour spout) to get rid of those bubbles.If you don’t have a fluted cutter, you can use the tip of a chopstick or fork to make a crimped edge around the rim of the dough.Immediately reduce the heat to 350°F/180°C, and bake for 26-29 minutes, until filling is just set (if a toothpick can stand up in it, it’s done).For the best results and mind blowing texture and taste, eat these Hong Kong egg tarts while they are still warm! .

The 8 Best Chinese Bakeries In San Francisco

The 8 Best Chinese Bakeries In San Francisco

The 8 Best Chinese Bakeries In San Francisco

Every time I come here, I’m mesmerized watching the large rotating cast iron griddles that achieve each cookie’s signature thinness and crunch. .

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