Does Tart Cherry Juice Increase Nitric Oxide
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Does Tart Cherry Juice Increase Nitric Oxide

  • July 16, 2022

More sour and acidic than sweet cherries, the tart variation contains a higher concentration of healthy phytochemicals (natural plant substances), like flavonoids, making them a superior antioxidant.An International Journal of Sports Nutrition study examined the effect of tart cherries on exercise performance.It turned out that the lifters that took tart cherry supplements felt less sore in their legs after this workout.Numerous studies have explored the effects of tart cherry powder on endurance athletes.The cherry group also had zero cases of upper respiratory problems, while the placebo runners reported symptoms like cough, sore throat, and congestion.One such review, published in Current Sports Medicine Reports, provides a general dosing guideline for athletes.A Journal of Human Nutrition and Food Science review concluded that the equivalent of 50 cherries per serving, twice a day appears to be the only consistent amount that is effective.Unlike beets, the effect isn’t thought to be on circulation via increased nitric oxide production.Packed with nine grams of protein and 45 tart cherries, two of these bottles per day puts you in the clinically studied dose category.Enhanced Mobility is a joint supplement containing patented versions of Boswellia, ginger, curcumin (the active compound in turmeric), and tart cherries.It’s a family owned farm based in Washington that’s been the largest producer of tart cherries since 1962.Based on recent research, we know that tart cherries certainly aren’t going to hurt your performance in the gym. .

9 Unexpected Cherry Benefits (and why you should be eating more!)

9 Unexpected Cherry Benefits (and why you should be eating more!)

9 Unexpected Cherry Benefits (and why you should be eating more!)

The bright red color of cherries is due to anthocyanins, which are great antioxidants!Antioxidants fight against potentially damaging free radicals (which are basically molecules with unshared electrons that float around wreaking havoc).High pectin in the cherries mean they’re full of soluble fiber.A study had participants drink ¼ cup of tart cherry juice at morning and night.Bing : Being the most popular sweet cherries, these are large, dark red/purple, and ultra-sweet.: This second most popular variety is a bit smaller but just as sweet as the bing Maraschino : Cherries that have been bleached then soaked in high fructose corn syrup and dyed bright red.: Cherries that have been bleached then soaked in high fructose corn syrup and dyed bright red.Rainier : Being more mild in flavor than the Bing, and with a yellow/pink skin, these are usually the ones that are turned into maraschinos.: Being more mild in flavor than the Bing, and with a yellow/pink skin, these are usually the ones that are turned into maraschinos.They’re in season from May to August (depending on the type), so reap the cherry benefits and eat up! .

Tart Cherries Are Sweet for Blood Vessel Health

Tart Cherries Are Sweet for Blood Vessel Health

Tart Cherries Are Sweet for Blood Vessel Health

Now that it’s officially spring, you may be looking forward to the bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables that will soon be available in grocery stores, farmers markets and perhaps even your own garden.A recent study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology suggests that Montmorency cherries improve blood flow.When the men took the cherry supplements, their levels of nitric oxide rose and their blood flow came back to normal more quickly than when they took the placebo. .

Tart Cherry Juice Benefits for Athletes

Tart Cherry Juice Benefits for Athletes

Tart Cherry Juice Benefits for Athletes

Research has confirmed the various ways that tart cherries act to relieve common runner ailments.A team of scientists from Northumbria University found that there is a direct relationship between tart cherry consumption and recovery in marathon runners.Tart cherry juice aids in recovery by increasing antioxidant capacity, which reduces inflammation.Studies show that tart cherries work best when the body has had a few days to absorb the many phytonutrients that reduce/eliminate inflammation and improve muscle recovery time.The main reason tart cherries are great for muscle recovery is the sheer number of phytonutrients they contain compared to other superfruits.Looking at the comparison chart of phytonutrients below, you can see that tart cherries have many more ways to produce antioxidant effects than other superfruits and antioxidant-rich berries.Tart cherries are high in anthocyanins and give athletes and runners that competitive edge by increasing endurance performance and maximal oxygen consumption, which lowers exhaustive effects.Beet Boost contains tart cherry extract to quickly and effectively tackle inflammation and muscle recovery while supercharging stamina with beetroot powder.In addition, beets give performance enhancement in the form of nitrate upsurge to increase nitric oxide production.Tart cherry powdered Beet Boost can be bought at our shop to ramp up an athlete’s performance, workouts, results, and recovery. .

'Significant improvements in endurance performance', says 1st meta

'Significant improvements in endurance performance', says 1st meta

'Significant improvements in endurance performance', says 1st meta

While the new analysis is reportedly the first to evaluate tart cherry concentrate’s effect on endurance performance, a 2017 literature review in Current Sports Medicine Reports​​ (Vitale et al., Vol.230-239) concluded that, “for an athlete who has already peaked in training and looking to improve recovery and faster return to competition, TC may be beneficial.”.The concentrate is a useful and convenient formulation in preparation for and during international competitions as it is easily transported in luggage and can be provided on the road to a team in any environment.Individually, not all of the studies reported a benefit, but when the data was pooled together the scientists observed a significant improvement in endurance performance. .

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.Common treatments for high blood pressure (BP) and dyslipidemia include medications, but there is question as to whether natural sources may be adequate to reduce CVD risk factors.We examined the effects of tart cherry juice on lipid profiles, BP, glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in older adults.In this randomized-controlled clinical trial, 17 men and 20 women between the ages of 65–80 years were randomly assigned to consume 480 ml of tart cherry juice or control drink daily for 12 weeks.Neither tart cherry juice nor control significantly altered body weight, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diastolic BP, insulin and HOMA-IR.Our findings show that tart cherry juice can lower the levels of systolic BP and LDL cholesterol.1 Since the number of adults at or above the age of 65 is rapidly increasing and projected to exceed 82 million by the year 2040, CVD can be considered a major health threat.1 Common treatments for high BP and dyslipidemia include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, calcium antagonists, diuretics, and cholesterol-lowering drugs.Administration of antihypertensive agents for a few years to individuals with high blood pressure (BP) can delay transition to hypertension, but long lasting effects of the intervention and cost-effectiveness remain to be proven.Possible side effects include a dry cough, dizziness, bradycardia, peripheral edema and insomnia.These side effects paired with the fact that 84% of adults over the age of 57 are already taking at least one prescription medication per day, warrant the need for a natural remedy for the problem of CVD.Men and women of diverse race and ethnicities who live in Newark, Delaware and the surrounding areas were recruited.Recruiting materials were placed in the local community, including senior living facilities, event halls, churches, and public bulletin boards.Inclusion criteria included men and women between the ages of 65–80 years who consumed ≤5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day.Individuals receiving treatment with any medications that may influence brain function or have had any prior diagnosis or history of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, gastrointestinal disease, cancer, central nervous system or psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, or impaired cognitive function were excluded.Additionally, heavy smokers (>20 cigarettes per day) or individuals allergic to tart cherry were excluded from this study.Researchers and personnel, including the biostatistician, were blinded to the groups when measuring BP and anthropometrics, running the assays, and analyzing the data.This study was conducted according to the guidelines laid down in the Declaration of Helsinki and all procedures involving human subjects were approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Delaware.Control drink was prepared by mixing unsweetened black cherry flavored Kool-Aid (Kraft Foods, United States) with water.In addition, participants were given customized calendars and were asked to mark the days they missed consuming the study regimen and to return any unused portion for compliance monitoring purposes.Collected food records were analyzed using Nutrition Data System for Research software (NDSR, Minneapolis, MN).Mean ± SD Mean ± SD Age, years 69.5 ± 3.9 70.0 ± 3.7 0.65 Body height, cm 169.6 ± 7.9 165.5 ± 6.8 0.25 Body mass, kg 78.7 ± 13.5 78.0 ± 10.3 0.56 BMI, kg cm −2 27.3 ± 4.2 28.5 ± 3.7 0.34 n (%) n (%) Sex, male/female 9/8 (53/47) 8/12 (40/60) 0.43 Education Level 0.63 Completed high school 5 (29) 5 (25) 2-year college degree 1 (6) 4 (20) 4-year college degree 6 (36) 7 (35) Higher education 5 (29) 4 (20) Income 0.05 Under 25 000 0 (0) 3 (15) 25 000–49 999 1 (6) 0 (0) 50 000–74 999 2 (12) 8 (40) 75 000–99 999 3 (18) 0 (0) Over 100 000 8 (46) 5 (25) Prefer not to say 3 (18) 4 (20) Race 0.37 Asian 0 (0) 2 (10) Black or African American 2 (12) 1 (5) White 15 (88) 16 (80) Prefer not to say 0 (0) 1 (5) Marital status 0.87 Single never married 1 (6) 2 (10) Separated/divorced 3 (18) 4 (20) Married 13 (76) 14 (70) Employment status 0.01 Retired 15 (88) 10 (50) Working 2 (12) 10 (50).As a result, centered baseline physical activity score and dietary cholesterol and the terms of their interaction with the intervention variable were included in the ANCOVA model.Table 3 Anthropometric, blood pressure, glucose, and lipid profiles in older adults at baseline and 12 weeks after supplementation with tart cherry juice or control drink.Table 4 Dietary intake and physical activity in older adults at baseline and 12 weeks after supplementation with tart cherry juice or control drink.Baseline levels of systolic and diastolic BP were not statistically different between tart cherry and control groups ( Table 3 ).Baseline levels of TC, HDL, LDL, and TG were not statistically different between tart cherry and control groups ( Table 3 ).et al. demonstrated that consumption of 40 g concentrated tart cherry juice for six weeks significantly reduced both systolic and diastolic BP in individuals with type 2 diabetes.et al.

conducted a 6-week open label trial where healthy participants between the ages of 30–50 consumed 30 ml of a Montmorency tart cherry concentrate or a control beverage.They found that six weeks consumption of 30 ml tart cherry concentrate daily had no effects on arterial stiffness and BP.For instance, Ataie-Jafari 21 demonstrated that consumption of 40 g concentrated tart cherry juice for six weeks significantly reduced both systolic and diastolic BP in individuals with type 2 diabetes.Keane 22 demonstrated that 60 ml Montmorency tart cherry juice concentrate acutely lowered systolic BP over a period of three hours in younger men with early hypertension compared to control group.However, Lynn 25 conducted a 6-week open label trial where healthy participants between the ages of 30–50 consumed 30 ml of a Montmorency tart cherry concentrate or a control beverage.They found that six weeks consumption of 30 ml tart cherry concentrate daily had no effects on arterial stiffness and BP.Thus, it can be reasoned that the reduction in systolic BP seen in our present study was due in part to the presence of polyphenolic compounds in the tart cherry juice.Diebolt et al.28 reported a significant reduction in systolic BP following a short-term oral administration of polyphenolic compounds in rats.Another study showed that systolic and diastolic BPs were significantly reduced in adults following eight weeks consumption of drinks containing approximately 837 mg of polyphenols.29 This reduction could be attributable to the action of polyphenolic compounds as determined by bioavailability analysis.The proper functioning of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) is essential to avoid build up of atherosclerotic plaques, as VSMCs are responsible for normal, healthy vasculature tone.Following consumption of the beetroot juice, urinary nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator, was significantly increased resulting in a reduction in systolic and diastolic BPs.Johnson et al.8 also demonstrated that 8 weeks consumption of drinks containing 22 g freeze-dried blueberry significantly decreased systolic and diastolic BPs by 5.1% and 6.3%, respectively, in postmenopausal women.Various studies have shown that across a wide range of baseline intakes (ranging from less than 50 to greater than 80 mmol), increasing potassium intake provides beneficial in reducing systolic BP by 3.39–4.11 mmHg.34–36 A population study conducted by Khaw et al.37 also suggested that an increase in potassium by 20–30 mmol per day (∼700–1200 mg per day), which resulted in a 2 to 3 mmHg reduction in systolic BP.It is unlikely that the tart cherry concentrate used in the present study provided potassium in high enough quantities to elicit significant improvement in BP.Systolic BP and LDL cholesterol nonsignificantly increased after 12 weeks of control drink consumption when compared with baseline values.The sugar content of the control drink, which contained fructose may, in part, be responsible for the increase in LDL cholesterol and systolic BP.In a study by Litterio et al.,48 they found that rat fed chow diet supplemented with 10% (w/v) fructose in the drinking water for 4 weeks evidenced significantly increased systolic BP.Our findings suggest that daily incorporation of tart cherry juice or control (∼181 kcal per day) into a diet, without intentional dietary modification during the study, do not significantly affect the total energy intake of older adults.In addition, the analysis of possible confounding variables including dietary intake and physical activity were assessed.Study results could be influenced by various factors such as sample size, the duration of the tart cherry supplementation, and the possibility of under or over reporting dietary intake or differences in physical activity at baseline between groups.In order to eliminate the effects of confounding factors including physical activity and dietary cholesterol, the ANCOVA test was used.Finally, the majority of the research sample was White, married and earned ≥$75 000 per year which limits the generalizability of findings.In conclusion, daily incorporation of tart cherry juice into the diet can lower systolic BP and LDL cholesterol in older adults and could be a plausible intervention for improved cardiovascular health for this population.D. Mozaffarian, E. J.

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A Review of the Health Benefits of Cherries

A Review of the Health Benefits of Cherries

A Review of the Health Benefits of Cherries

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Top 7 Nitric Oxide Foods To Send Your Levels Soaring

Top 7 Nitric Oxide Foods To Send Your Levels Soaring

Top 7 Nitric Oxide Foods To Send Your Levels Soaring

One nutrient plays an important role in many recommended vegetables from popular diets — dietary nitrate.Your body needs dietary nitrates to create nitric oxide (NO), which is essential for heart health.Nitric oxide is so important that, in 1998, the Nobel prize for medicine was awarded to the 3 scientists who discovered its drastic effects on cardiovascular health.In this article, we’ll explain why nitric oxide is essential for your health, outline the best sources of dietary nitrate, and show you how to include them in your daily diet.If you can’t produce enough NO, you may have increased risk of serious health conditions, such as heart problems, diabetes, and erectile dysfunction.Sodium nitrates are converted by the body into nitrosamines, which may be harmful and have been linked to bowel cancer.In contrast, plant nitrates are beneficial, may contain vitamin C, and can prevent the formation of nitrosamines.The results of many of these studies have suggested that nitric oxide provides a wide range of health benefits, including:.— Studies suggest that increasing NO levels could have similar benefits to blood pressure meds.— Research suggests combining exercise with a nitrate-rich diet helps boost athletic performance and aid recovery.It is possible to boost your nitric oxide levels by eating nitrate-rich foods and plant protein.Harvard Medical School highlights these two minerals to be especially important for heart health, but kale’s superfood powers don’t stop there.Harvard Medical School highlights these two minerals to be especially important for heart health, but kale’s superfood powers don’t stop there.It helps your body get rid of sodium, a mineral that can negatively impact healthy blood pressure levels.— One study suggested that eating a meal packed with spinach can increase the amount of NO in your saliva by eight times and decrease systolic blood pressure.It helps your body get rid of sodium, a mineral that can negatively impact healthy blood pressure levels.[17] Spirulina has high levels of plant proteins essential for nitric oxide production.— In a human research trial, 4.5 grams of spirulina per day was shown to help support healthy blood pressure levels in both men and women.[17] Spirulina has high levels of plant proteins essential for nitric oxide production.— With bitter leaves and sweet stems, swiss chard has more to offer than just dynamic flavor.Eating dark chocolate (search for 70-80% cocoa) is a decadent way to boost nitric oxide levels.Cocoa contains natural compounds called flavonols, which promote increased nitric oxide levels.[19] Other studies suggest the flavonols in dark chocolate may help optimize blood flow and brain function and lower the risk of heart disease.Amino acids, such as L-arginine and L-citrulline, are essential in order for your body to be able to produce nitric oxide.The amino acid L-arginine, also called arginine, is found in foods such as nuts (particularly walnuts) and seeds.A small human study involving 8 patients with cystitis had increased NO levels after two weeks of daily L-arginine supplements.It’s important to note that while 20 milligrams daily is considered safe, some people have side effects including stomach problems, even at lower doses.In one study, 38 adults who were given 70 milliliters of beetroot juice were shown to have elevated NO levels 45 and 90 minutes afterward.Some studies suggest that vitamin C might also increase the amount of nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme essential for NO production.As well as eating citrus fruits whole, or juicing them, try adding the zest to your salad, seafood, or fish dish to boost your intake.Watermelon isn’t just refreshing and hydrating — it’s also a good source of the amino acid L-citrulline that converts to arginine and then is used to produce NO.A small study in which eight men drank 300ml of watermelon juice daily for two weeks showed increased bioavailability of NO.The rich red seeds of pomegranates are full of antioxidants that promote the formation of NO and protect it from damage.Step 1 : Add the orange, kale, apple, carrot, beet, and ginger to a juicer and juice until well-blended.: Add the orange, kale, apple, carrot, beet, and ginger to a juicer and juice until well-blended.Working in this order, place the soft or liquid ingredients into a blender and process until they liquefy into a well-blended mixture.Working in this order, place the soft or liquid ingredients into a blender and process until they liquefy into a well-blended mixture.Put a large bowl under the cheesecloth and place the remaining pulp in the middle of the cloth.A smoothie bowl is a great way to start the day or to boost your energy at any time.: Combine all ingredients Step 2 (optional) : Top with homemade granola, more cranberries, cacao nibs, bee pollen, coconut, and sunflower seeds.: Top with homemade granola, more cranberries, cacao nibs, bee pollen, coconut, and sunflower seeds.Its always handy to have a healthy snack on hand to satisfy a sweet tooth, or an afternoon energy slump that might result in you reaching for a candy bar.These delicious truffles combine a beets powder with collagen, along with dark chocolate or cacao nibs for an extra NO boosting effect.Scientists agree: Nitric oxide is vital for your long term heart, energy, exercise performance, and brain function.Foods high in dietary nitrate include leafy greens, dark chocolate, beets, citrus fruits, watermelon, and pomegranates.Increasing physical activity through regular exercise may also help to optimize your NO levels.Because of modern farming practices, vegetables like beets can vary up to 300% in their dietary nitrate levels, and may even cause them to be nutrient- and vitamin-deficient. .

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