How To Make Custard Tart
Tart

How To Make Custard Tart

  • June 21, 2022

The default gifts of socks and jocks isn't particularly exciting, yet it's what many Dad's receive on the day on which we are supposed to celebrate and acknowledge fathers for all that they do.Thankfully my Dad loves to read, so there were always plenty of books from his favourite authors, Bryce Courtney and Wilbur Smith, to choose from.So for Father's day I thought I'd share Dad's favourite treat - individual custard tarts.And it's one I've just discovered is a favorite of my husband too as he devoured one, still warm, just out of the oven, and admitted, between mouthfuls, he'd happily eat all 6! .

Egg Custard Tarts

Egg Custard Tarts

Egg Custard Tarts

Inspired by The Great British Baking Show, I tried my hand at a classic Egg Custard Tart.Instructions For pastry, stir the flour and ground almonds together in a large bowl, then add the butter and rub in with your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.Crack in the egg and mix it with your fingers until the mixture forms a soft dough.Roll out the sweet pastry on a lightly floured work surface.Using an 11cm/4½in fluted cutter, cut out twelve discs and line the muffin tray moulds with the pastry circle.For custard filling, warm the milk in a pot until steaming, but not simmering at all, and beat the egg yolks and sugar together in a separate bowl until pale and creamy.Pour the milk onto the egg yolk mixture and whisk well, creating little bubbles.The base of the tarts should be perfectly baked through, without having over-cooked the custard filling.This is one of those baking recipes that really shows your attention to detail I think (mine sucks, frankly).The sweet pastry dough ended up being nice and soft after I mixed in the egg.For starters, I didn’t have the right size cutter so I had to freeform the rounds.I think the next time I would raise them up a tiny bit more as I basically just made them level with the tins.The thing I failed to do was rotate my muffin tin halfway through baking.Three of my tarts were slightly underbaked and stuck a bit to the muffin tin.The custard didn’t seem overcooked to me and the tart shell was nice and crispy all around. .

Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts

Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts

Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts

A popular and modern twist on this recipe is to serve just the custard that is baked in small ramekins without any pastry.The mini tart pans/molds that I used are fluted, which give them a pretty presentation and measure 2 3/4” (7cm) wide by 3/4” (2cm) high.If you’ve made these Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts, please feel free to leave a comment below. .

How to make the perfect custard tart

How to make the perfect custard tart

How to make the perfect custard tart

Those thrown by Laurel, Hardy et al were, according to slapstick pioneer Mack Sennett, “full of a sort of paste and sticky stuff so that when they hit they didn’t splatter too much, but dripped nice and gooey”, while the favoured weapon of the Tiswas Phantom Flan Flinger seems to have, in fact, been coloured shaving foam (sorry, children of the 70s).Not to be confused with the sweet, crisp Portuguese pastel de nata, or indeed the creme patissiere-filled flan nature favoured by the French, the similar tarts found in every high-street baker until relatively recently boasted a biscuity, shortcrust shell filled with a firm, distinctly eggy and only moderately sweet custard dusted with nutmeg.I reject any recipes calling for puff or flaky pastry on the grounds of their suspiciously foreign influence – shortcrust is the only thing good enough for my custard.(Also, Julian Baggini may know a lot about philosophy but I disagree with his claim that shortcrust is “less flavoursome” than puff and fails to “provide as much textural contrast with the smooth custard”.).Jane Grigson opts for a plain version in English Food; the Leiths Baking Bible, Marcus Wareing and Justin Gellatly a rich, sweet shortcrust with sugar and eggs; and Constance Spry recommends a pate brisee with so much water that I have to start again, while cursing the entire French nation she credits the recipe to.It’s vital, when dealing with a filling as liquid as this, to prepare your pastry defences with meticulous care and to invest in an insurance policy of beaten egg for good measure.Wareing adds lemon zest to his pastry, which, lovely as it is, overpowers the flavour of the custard – Gary Rhodes’s grated nutmeg is a much more harmonious addition and allows for a double whammy of my favourite sweet spice.The more yolks, of course, the richer the colour and flavour of the result, but the proteins in egg whites will give the custard the firmer consistency I remember as the hallmark of the bakers’ tarts of my youth.Spry, whose custard merits a single, damning “underwhelming” in my notes, uses only “creamy milk” and melted butter, thickened with a little flour (which must be the French influence).The richest version of all comes from Gellatly, who claims in his book Bread, Cake, Doughnut, Pudding, that he has received marriage proposals on the strength of it, and uses double cream.Rhodes and Wareing go for the slightly lighter whipping version, and Grigson a mixture of double and Channel Island milk (in heavy favour of the former, admittedly).Now, I’m not saying I wouldn’t get down on one knee in front of Gellatly, married or not, in the hope he would keep me in custard for the rest of my natural life, but the delicate quiver of both his and Wareing’s decadently creamy tarts sets them far apart from the more robust traditional version.That said, Spry’s spartan version wobbles rather too far to the eggy side: a mixture of whipping cream and Guernsey milk seems to offer the ideal formula for a custard that’s rich and smooth, but not overwhelmingly so.Medieval tarts would seem rather plain for modern tastes; Grigson’s version, based on a doucet, uses a scant tablespoon of honey, or the even pricier sugar, while everyone else sticks in at least five times that.Grigson infuses her recipe with saffron, Gellatly and Leiths vanilla, and Spry orange flower water – all excellent possibilities for the curious, but this is one place where my favourite sweet spice, nutmeg, has no equal.Mix in the sugar, a good pinch of salt and a generous grating of nutmeg then add the beaten yolks, a little at a time, until the pastry begins to come together; you may not need them all. .

Vanilla Custard Fresh Fruit Tart Recipe

Vanilla Custard Fresh Fruit Tart Recipe

Vanilla Custard Fresh Fruit Tart Recipe

But even if making a custard-filled fruit tart requires some patience, it is as simple as following instructions and paying a little attention to details.Our tart features a sweet, crumbly crust filled with velvety smooth vanilla custard, all topped with ripe, juicy fruit for a refreshing treat. .

Strawberry Custard Tart Recipe

Strawberry Custard Tart Recipe

Strawberry Custard Tart Recipe

This simple and delicious Strawberry Custard Tart features all the goodness of fresh summer fruit with a creamy homemade custard and a buttery shortbread crust for the ultimate treat that’s perfect for pretty much any occasion this season (I’m looking at you, summertime picnics).It’s comfort food and fresh, summery goodness all in one: with beautiful, ruby-colored berries, a homemade custard filling that reminds me of something my grandma makes, and a buttery shortbread crust that is just dreamy.It’s equal parts elegant and easy, picnic-worthy and date-night-in-worthy, and every ingredient needed is likely already in your pantry or fridge.This ingredient is often used but rarely highlighted in dessert recipes, and yet it plays one of the most pivotal roles.In addition to providing nutrition, rich flavor and color to recipes, eggs also are the key to leavening, binding, thickening, glazing and emulsifying in cooking and baking.Today, we are lauding the egg as the star of this show-stopping dessert that is perfect for all of your summertime parties, picnics and more.Eggs are a nutrient powerhouse that contribute to health and wellbeing at every age and life stage, and in any diet.They pack a nutritional punch, with one egg containing 6 grams of high-quality protein and all nine essential amino acids, all for only 70 calories.Using a different size, without making an adjustment, will affect texture, flavor balance, consistency and, in most cases, will give an unsatisfactory result.Learn more about how Minnesota farmers provide excellent care for hens and produce safe, nutritious eggs.In short, you’ll need to make a shortbread crust, the custard filling, and top it all off with fresh sliced strawberries.Cut in the butter until the mixture is crumbly, then press it together into the bottom and sides of a greased tart pan.Cut in the butter until the mixture is crumbly, then press it together into the bottom and sides of a greased tart pan.Use the bottom of a drinking glass to press down the slightly puffed-up crust, then cool completely.I would not recommend freezing this tart completely assembled, as the custard may lose its delightful consistency once frozen.Unwrap, remove the tart pan sides (leave the base), and top with strawberries. .

Classic English Egg Custard Tart Recipe

Classic English Egg Custard Tart Recipe

Classic English Egg Custard Tart Recipe

Served with afternoon tea or used as a dessert, this recipe will certainly bring back childhood memories for anyone lucky enough to eat these when young. .

Custard Tart

Custard Tart

Custard Tart

Find more English-inspired recipes and traditional English puddings in the January/February issue today!When my mum decided my twin brother and I deserved a treat, we would pay the bakery a visit, and without fail, I would get the same thing every time: a custard tart.It is a love from childhood that has endured; a simple custard tart will always be a nostalgic pleasure for me.Using a fork, gently stir egg into flour mixture until dough starts to come together.On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a 12-inch circle, ¼ inch thick.Top dough with a piece of crumpled parchment paper, letting ends extend over edges of pan.(The egg yolk creates a nice seal so that the liquid in the filling can’t make the pastry soggy.).Carefully pull out rack, and pour Custard Filling into prepared crust.Bake until set around the edges but still slightly jiggly in center, 30 to 40 minutes. .

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