How To Make Egg Tart Hong Kong Style
Tart

How To Make Egg Tart Hong Kong Style

  • June 22, 2022

Why It Works A laminated dough produces the distinct flaky layers in the crust that bake up crisp and light.Walk around in any Chinatown and you’ll eventually find yourself browsing the display case of a Chinese bakery.With its silky, sweet egg custard filling encased by crisp and tender puff pastry, this tart is believed to have originated in Canton (now Guangzhou) around the 1920s, in response to the sudden influx of British businessmen and officials and their love of the British egg custard tart.The southern Chinese city was a prominent international port destination dating to the 18th century, and attracted British chefs and bakers who shared many of their recipes—including egg tarts.(Contrary to popular belief, daan tat are not based on the Portugese pastel de nata.While daan tat had its origins in mainland China, it wasn’t until after World War II that the Cantonese egg tart made its way to Hong Kong, as wealthy Cantonese people migrated to the major port city.It’s in Hong Kong that the pastry was perfected, helping to catapult the city’s status to global food destination.(In a circuitous move, Cantonese chefs later developed their own short crust version in response to rising demand for egg tarts.For the purposes of this recipe, I decided to stick to the Hong Kong style of egg tart, which I think is the gold standard.But the most important quality of the tart is the puff pastry: Light, delicate, and super crispy with multiple layers.“Adding lard makes the pastry flakier and [gives] a unique aroma,” says Wong Wai-Tim, executive dim sum chef at Royal Garden Chinese Restaurant in Hong Kong.When baked, the butter melts away, any water evaporates (which causes the ‘puff’), and the layers of dough separate.For Chinese puff pastry, the oil-dough layer can contain as much as 80 percent flour relative to the weight of fat.After baking this dough, I noticed smaller layers of short crust as the fat melted and water evaporated, which likely contributed to its coveted delicate texture.(Additionally, the lamination process involves rolling and folding the dough multiple times—systematically pressing the layers together.Lard also has a different texture compared to butter at room temperature; it’s softer, so it tends to roll out in a laminated dough more easily.The downside is that lard tends to incorporate into the dough more readily (especially if your rolling technique isn’t great), so you have to be more careful to keep the layers separate.It produced similarly tender and flaky layers as the lard dough, with the added benefit of extra separation between layers—likely due to the water in butter converting to steam during baking.I also found it important to roll the dough very thin prior to cutting and lining the tart molds—thinner than you would expect.But for these tarts, I wasn’t looking for deep golden brown or any hints of caramelization in the filling.So I found the ideal baking temperature around 400°F (205°C)—hot enough for rapid expansion, but low enough for the custard to set without browning. .

Hong Kong Egg Tart (港式蛋挞)

Hong Kong Egg Tart (港式蛋挞)

Hong Kong Egg Tart (港式蛋挞)

Authentic Chinese bakery style Hong Kong egg tart that features flaky crumbly pastry crust filled with a sweet creamy custard that you’ll want to eat morning, noon, and night!There’s the Portuguese egg tart which has a caramelized top and a thin layered crispy pastry shell.And then there’s the original, the Hong Kong egg tart that has a milder filling and a pastry crust that is flaky and crumbly.For Hong Kong egg tarts to taste amazingly delicious, you need to get a few components right.Back in the kitchen, our goal is to recreate the perfect Hong Kong egg tart that resembles what you can get at the Chinese bakery.Inside, the custard filling is mildly sweet enough to satisfy while having a luxurious, creamy texture.The recipe might look super long and the folding method can be a bit hard to understand at a glance.Then you will get a pastry dough that has super thin layers, does not require refrigeration, and is easy to work with!However, you should always make the filling fresh (it’s super easy) and assemble the tarts right before cooking.You might be able to use a pastry cutter to knead it on the counter too, but that method requires some experience and will take a lot longer.NOTE: This pastry dough does not require chilling but you might need to rest it in the fridge if your room is hot.On the other hand, if you chill the dough while it rests, it might become a bit too stiff to work with and might require a few minutes at room temperature to loosen up.But since this process does not require refrigeration or working with a chilled dough, it’s so much easier and faster to put together.Cut the tart dough into halves and work on one at a time (to prevent from drying out).Once you’ve assembled all the tarts, bake them until the custard sets and the crust is crispy.These Hong Kong egg tarts are SO delicious when you serve them fresh and slightly warm.And you can make them as finger food for holidays such as Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Chinese New Year.I’ve also tried storing the tarts at room temperature in a sealed container overnight (I thought the crust would stay crispier that way).In comparison, I prefer the fridge storing method better because the crust stays crispy and the filling more fresh.Their tiny size and wonderful flavor make them fun to eat at any time, and they’ll be a sure hit for small gatherings.This recipe uses a delicate pastry dough and I highly recommend using a scale for measurement instead of cups to achieve the best result.Subscribe Hong Kong Egg Tart (港式蛋挞) Authentic Chinese bakery style Hong Kong egg tart that features flaky crumbly pastry crust filled with a sweet creamy custard that you’ll want to eat morning, noon, and night!This recipe uses a delicate pastry dough and I highly recommend using a scale for measurement instead of cups to achieve the best result.120 g (1/2 cup) evaporated milk Equipment 4 1/2 ” (11.5cm) Fluted pastry cutter (not required but highly recommended) (*Footnote 1).Egg tart mold (Scantily over 2″ on the base, 3″ top for the inner edge, and 3.3″ top for the outer edge) Instructions Prepare Water Dough Combine the flour and chilled butter in the bowl of a stand mixer.(*Footnote 2) Carefully pinch the dough with your fingers and it should form a thin semi-transparent sheet.Gently knead the water dough for a few times until it forms a 6” (15 cm) smooth round ball.Fold the short sides of the rectangle inward, leaving about one finger’s width in the middle.Let rest for 15 to 30 minutes at room temperature, or in the refrigerator if the dough feels soggy or loose.Using a large, round pastry cutter (5 3/8”, fluted if possible) cut out 8 circles of dough.Gently drop and tap the cup to help the dough fall into place.Aim to have a small lip over the side of the cup, since the dough shrinks as it cooks.If you plan to make the full batch, repeat the shaping method to work on the second half of the dough.Meanwhile, cover the assembled pastry cups with plastic wrap to prevent them from drying out.Storage Once the egg tarts have cooled completely, you can store them in an airtight container in the fridge for 2 to 3 days.Notes If you do not have a pastry cutter, use a bowl or cup with a similar size opening.Lilja Walter is a part of the Omnivore’s Cookbook team and worked closely with Maggie to develop and test this recipe. .

Hong Kong Style Egg Tarts Recipe

Hong Kong Style Egg Tarts Recipe

Hong Kong Style Egg Tarts Recipe

In the future, I'll have to thin out the dough and reduce the temp, while cooking a bit longer to make sure these come out as nicely as I like them.I started with cutting the butter into the sugar-flour mixture, but ended up using my hands, which were much better at making the small crumbs described. .

How to make Chinese Egg Tarts- recipe, video and complete guide

How to make Chinese Egg Tarts- recipe, video and complete guide

How to make Chinese Egg Tarts- recipe, video and complete guide

You must be familiar with the Hong Kong egg tarts if you like Cantonese dim sum.Whilst the barbecue meat bun is the signature of the savory dim sum, the most lovable dessert will be none other than the Hong Kong egg tart.Since Macau is just a short boat ride from Hong Kong, the locals had modified the original Portuguese egg tarts and served them along with other Cantonese dim sums for breakfast.Macau’s version resembles the Portuguese tarts with a scorched caramelized exterior.“The flavor of the Chinese puff pastry (酥皮) is different from the western version.The flavor of Hong Kong egg tarts fresh from the oven is simply amazing.Many people wish to make it at home but finally, give up because of the tedious process and the skills required.However, the essence of the egg tarts lies in the unreplaceable texture and flavor of the Chinese puff pastry.You need to use the Chinese puff pastry for this recipe to make the REAL and AUTHENTIC Hong Kong style egg tarts comparable to the best dim sum store in Hong Kong and Southern China.Making puff pastry is tedious, but it is highly rewarding when you enjoy the fruits of your labor.Now is your turn to bake and enjoy eating this famous Hong Kong dim sum as much as I do.The upper side of the pastry will be evenly trimmed and the perforated layer will be clearly visible after baking.It helps to keep the butter from melting and the rapid rise in temperature in the oven creates distinct layers of the pastry.The upper side of the pastry will be evenly trimmed and the perforated layer will be clearly visible after baking.It helps to keep the butter from melting and the rapid rise in temperature in the oven creates distinct layers of the pastry.The egg will be partially cooked by the hot syrup and forms small lumps which are unsightly.The initial high temperature will cause the pastry to rise up rapidly, and form a multi-layer structure, whilst the lower heat will finish the cooking subsequently.Leave the oven door ajar for five minutes then remove the egg tarts to let them cool down slowly.will cause the pastry to rise up rapidly, and form a multi-layer structure, whilst the lower heat will finish the cooking subsequently.Leave the oven door ajar for five minutes then remove the egg tarts to let them cool down slowly.Once the egg tarts cool down, the sugar syrup will form a shiny layer on the surface of the custard.Many people encounter the tearing of the water dough, which causes the oil layer in the middle to ooze out to the surface.So more flour is required, and eventually, the dough will turn into a lump of sticky mass.Place a large piece of cling film on the surface of the chiller top or a stainless steel table.It is not worth spending the time to remove (and potentially messy) any small amount from there, as there will be no significant impact on the final result.The most frustrating thing when making puff pastry is when the butter starts to melt and leak through the layers of the dough.The layers of the pastry will be poorly defined and the butter will stick to the rolling pins and the table.The most frustrating thing when making puff pastry is when the butter starts to melt and leak through the layers of the dough.The layers of the pastry will be poorly defined and the butter will stick to the rolling pins and the table.The best way is to place the pastry quickly in the freezer to let the butter harden before resuming the folding and rolling process.I usually cut a piece of pastry big enough to cover the entire inner surface of the mold with some extra for trimming.Since puff pastry will shrink after rolling, it is best to rest it for a few minutes then trim the excess.I usually cut a piece of pastry big enough to cover the entire inner surface of the mold with some extra for trimming.Since puff pastry will shrink after rolling, it is best to rest it for a few minutes then trim the excess.Traditional Hong Kong egg tarts are made with lard, but the trend has shifted towards butter.Traditional Hong Kong egg tarts are made with lard, but the trend has shifted towards butter.I conducted a thorough review of this post in May 2020, and have made certain amendments to the recipe and included some additional information as below :.This position will avoid the egg filling being heated too quickly, while the pastry is still underbaked.This position will avoid the egg filling being heated too quickly, while the pastry is still underbaked.The egg custard will collapse after cooling if the filling is puffed up too high in the oven.by ten degrees Celsius, and keep the oven door ajar for a few seconds to reduce the temperature.Keep the work tidy by using a metal spoon and silicone spatula to transfer the oil dough.Trim off the excess pastry by pressing the side of the tart mold with the dough cutter or any flat object. .

The Hong Kong Egg Tart Is Iconic—How to Make Them At Home

The Hong Kong Egg Tart Is Iconic—How to Make Them At Home

The Hong Kong Egg Tart Is Iconic—How to Make Them At Home

The Hong Kong egg tart is a quintessential part of Cantonese cuisine that’s the product of both British and Chinese tastes.Instead of using the expensive, imported ingredients the British tarts called for, like butter and custard powder, chefs used lard to make flaky puff pastry and whisked together a filling of eggs, sugar, water, and a touch of milk.“If you go to dim sum—or even if you go to a Chinese bakery—[the experience is] almost incomplete if you don’t get one.” San Francisco pastry chef Melissa Chou, of Grand Opening Bakery, agrees.Why would I do that myself?” It’s simpler to go the shortcrust route, but Cho, Chou, and I all agree that egg tarts made with flaky puff pastry are superior in taste and texture.With Chinese puff pastry, you start with two separate doughs: one made with flour, water, and eggs, and another that includes lard or shortening. .

Egg Tarts (Hong Kong Style)

Egg Tarts (Hong Kong Style)

Egg Tarts (Hong Kong Style)

They’re so buttery, flaky, and the smooth and silky custard filling is undeniably luscious.Every time we go to an Asian market, I always love to buy some egg tarts.– I used plain white granulated sugar, to add a little touch of sweetness to the custard.Make a Simple Syrup: In a small saucepan add the sugar and water.Using a cookie cutter that’s the same size in diameter as the top of your egg tart molds, cut into 12 rounds.Pour the Custard in Shells: Place the tart molds on a baking sheet that large enough for all of them.These Egg Tarts were introduced to Hong Kong in the 1940’s, and initially could only be found in higher-end Western-style restaurants.Although originally designed to attract the local expatriate community, they quickly became a favorite with the Chinese.Egg custard in a baked pastry shell is a dim sum staple throughout Hong Kong.The Macanese egg tarts are sweeter than the Hong Kong ones and the tops are caramelized.The filling of a good egg tart will look smooth and shiny and will be creamy and moist on the tongue.Both will complement the filling, combining a sweet, eggy and buttery flavor.Egg tarts are at their most delicious when served warm: if they’re cold, reheat them for about five minutes in the oven.You can always roll out the pastry dough and use a 3 inch cookie cutter to cut out circles, then place them in the egg tart molds.If you notice a custard filling starting to puff up a bit too much, your oven is usually a little too hot.You can refrigerate egg tarts in an airtight container after they have completely cooled.Freezing is not recommended because custard has the tendency to separate as it defrosts and the liquid that weeps out will be absorbed by the pastry, making it soggy.However, you can make the pastry dough ahead of time and freeze for a few months. .

Hong Kong Style Egg Tart Recipe

Hong Kong Style Egg Tart Recipe

Hong Kong Style Egg Tart Recipe

Do you ever pass by a Chinese bakery and are enticed in by the delicious smells wafting out the door?Or, even better, when you’re at dim sum and you order a fresh plate so they’re warm and custardy and all the good things in life wrapped up in one handheld treat.Anyway, I guess I’m still kind of a spoiled brat because I still only want to eat the insides.The shells weren’t hard to work with, per se – they were just annoying and fiddly.I brûléed some of them because I’m obsessed with our kitchen torch and the crisp contrast of caramelized sugar and creamy custard was out of this world. .

Vegan Egg Tarts (Hong Kong style)

Vegan Egg Tarts (Hong Kong style)

Vegan Egg Tarts (Hong Kong style)

Egg tarts often accompany other treats at yum cha and in Chinese bakeries.I wanted to make vegan egg custard tarts which were as authentic as possible so I adapted a recipe which was passed down to my mother.To keep the authenticity of this popular Chinese dessert, I used proper substitutions of the original ingredients.To make up for the lack of egg, I changed the ratios in the recipe and added a few ingredients!Traditionally the pastry for egg tarts is made with lard so aren't even vegetarian friendly!Adding milk powder gives these pastries a 'Chinese bakery smell' and depth of flavour.Adding milk powder gives these pastries a 'Chinese bakery smell' and depth of flavour.On a floured surface, roll out your pastry to a little less than 5 mm (¼ inch) thick.Use a cookie cutter slightly larger than your egg tart tins and cut out some rounds of pastry!Transfer each pastry round to a greased tart tin and press it against the bottom and sides.I won't lie - shaping each vegan egg tart is the most tedious step in this recipe.When the pastry is blind baked, it stays compact, firm and maintains its shape.Place a smaller or similar sized mini egg tart tin on top.(left picture) Place a small cupcake tin on top of your egg tart shells.(right picture) I've also heard that you can scrunch baking paper or aluminium foil into a ball and place it in your pastry shells.to create a silky custard texture (traditionally, dairy evaporated milk is used).First, I'd recommend mixing your custard powder with a few tablespoons of soy milk.Then simply add all the custard ingredients to a medium saucepan and place over medium-high heat.This means the custard powder and agar is activated and will help everything set :).▢ ⅔ cup (150g) vegan block butter chilled, plus extra for greasing the tins (note 1).▢ Pinch of black salt (kala namak) for the eggy flavour, to taste.▢ Pinch of turmeric to colour (note 3) Instructions I'd strongly recommend using grams (and teaspoons for the smaller amounts) rather than cups for this recipe (especially for the custard)!Add all the pastry ingredients to a food processor and pulse until just combined.If your pastry is too soft to be rolled out, place it in an airtight container and chill it in the fridge for about 1 hour.On a lightly floured surface, roll out your pastry to about 5 mm thick (a little less than ¼ inch).To prepare for blind baking, place similar or smaller sized tart or cupcake tins on top.When the oven is ready, bake the shells for around 15 minutes or until the edges are slightly golden brown.Place all your baked tart shells (while they're still in their tins) on a large tray or in a container.Allow them to sit at room temperature for 5 minutes then transfer them to the fridge for 1-2 hours or until set.Alternatively, store the egg tarts in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 5 days.Notes Lard and shortening are used in traditional egg tarts so I'd highly recommend vegan block butter.I'm based in Australia and used 'Foster Clarks' custard powder which is a mainstream supermarket brand and accidentally vegan.This has the same ingredients as other mainstream brands around the world such as Bird's Custard Powder so I assume they work exactly the same!I'd recommend only a very small pinch of turmeric to start and add more if desired.As an Amazon Associate, I may earn a small commission from qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you. .

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

However, both the English and Portuguese versions ultimately come from the king of pastries, France, while the egg tarts you'll find in Chinese restaurants and bakeries today are distinct from their European cousins.Legend says the monks had been based in France, where they learned of delectable pastries, and that they needed a way to use up the yolks separated from the egg whites that were used to starch clothing.Sensing impending closure after the the Liberal Revolution of 1820, the enterprising monks of the Jerónimos Monastery started selling pastéis de nata to a nearby sugar refinery.Portugal, with its long history of naval exploration, first landed in Guangzhou Province in 1513 while Hong Kong became a British colony in the early 1840s.After World War II, eating establishments called cha chaan tengs, literally “tea restaurants,” started popping up in Hong Kong.Casual and inexpensive, they specialized in Western-style dishes with a Chinese twist, including milk tea, "French" toast, and egg tarts.A Portuguese colony from 1557 to 1999, Macau has probably seen its fair share of pastéis de nata, but a uniquely Macanese egg tart seems to have arisen more recently.While Stow originally developed the tart for the homesick Portuguese community, they were an instant hit with the local Chinese as well, and continue to be. .

Egg Tarts (Hong Kong style) – Kitchen (Mis)Adventures

Egg Tarts (Hong Kong style) – Kitchen (Mis)Adventures

Egg Tarts (Hong Kong style) – Kitchen (Mis)Adventures

I eventually plucked up the courage to make them, and it took me 3 tries before I finally made decent-looking egg tarts.This is to ensure that the butter in the dough doesn’t start melting at room temperature.Rub mixture using your hands until it has a rough, crumbly texture (like coarse sand).Gently mix the egg in, then knead mixture using your palm until it forms a smooth dough.4 Shape dough into a flattened ball, cover with cling wrap, then keep in refrigerator for 1 hour or longer if needed.Using a round cookie cutter (around the same size as your egg tart mould), cut out 12 circles from the dough sheet.7 Blind bake (by using pie weights, rice or dried beans) the tart shells for around 15 minutes at 180°C.9 In a mixing bowl, combine eggs, evaporated milk & vanilla extract. .

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