How To Make Nata Tart
Tart

How To Make Nata Tart

  • January 12, 2022

There are all kinds of reasons why the original pastéis de nata from this pastry shop are so freaking good.Secret recipes, teams of folks who do nothing but make the pastry dough or whip up the filling, ovens that blast at 800°F.The secrets to making spectacular authentic Portuguese custard tarts at home are few and simple.The tremendously delightful and charming London pastry queen Cupcake Jemma uses my recipe to make her delicious Portuguese custard tarts.Video Video: How to Make Pastéis de Nata Pastéis de Nata ~ Portuguese Custard Tarts This pastéis de nata recipe makes as-close-to-authentic Portuguese custard tarts with a rich egg custard nestled in shatteringly crisp pastry.David Leite Prep 1 hr Cook 1 hr 30 mins Total 2 hrs 30 mins Dessert Portuguese 40 pastries 83 kcal 4.81 / 118 votes Print Recipe Equipment ▢ Mini-muffin tin with 2-by-5/8-inch (50-by-15-mm) wells; If you prefer the classic larger tins from Portugal, you can purchase them at Portugalia Marketplace.Ingredients US Metric For the pasteis de nata dough ▢ 2 cups minus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour plus more for the work surface.▢ 2 sticks (8 oz) unsalted butter room temperature, stirred until smooth For the custard ▢ 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour.Generously flour a work surface and pat the dough into a 6-inch (15-cm) square using a pastry scraper.Flour the dough, cover with plastic wrap, and let it rest at room temperature for 15 minutes.Make the custard In a medium bowl, whisk the flour and 1/4 cup milk (60 ml) until smooth.Bring the sugar, cinnamon, and water to a boil in a small saucepan and cook until an instant-read thermometer registers 220°F (104°C).Meanwhile, in another small saucepan, scald the remaining 1 cup milk (237 ml).Remove the cinnamon stick and then pour the sugar syrup in a thin stream into the hot milk-and-flour mixture, whisking briskly.Whisk in the yolks, strain the mixture into a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside.Place 1 piece pastry dough, cut side down, in each well of a nonstick 12-cup mini-muffin pan (2-by-5/8-inch [50-by-15-mm] size).These are the original pastéis de nata tins that all the great pastry shops in Portugal use. .

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

If you've ever been to Portugal, you know that one of the greatest pastries to binge-eat there is the Portuguese egg tart: its crisp, flaky crust holding a creamy custard center, blistered on top from the high heat of an oven.If you don't want to buy molds (though Mendes highly recommends them), you can make these tarts in a muffin tin. .

Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)

Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)

Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)

Rating: 5 stars I made this in our motor home, and except for it taking longer because the oven only goes up to 425, the dessert came out delicious.Rating: 5 stars I saw these on a tv program and went to all receipes..... immediately and found that chief John made them....tried the recipe and I think I ate at least 6 myself...I got yelled at because the was only 2 left...had to make another batch and everything was ok....followed recipe exactly .....we're great...Rating: 5 stars Really amazing I made it and it turned out great just as tip don’t keep them in a plastic container because the shell will stop being crunchy and flaky it will become soft and moist Helpful (2).I turned the heat down to 500f for the same time, my house filled with smoke from the butter deep frying the tart.Rating: 5 stars Having just returned from a trip to Portugal, I had to learn to make these tartlets.Rating: 5 stars Took me a while to get the hang of it but I finally made a dozen of those delicious tarts and there all gone! .

Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)

Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)

Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)

Portuguese Custard Tarts are a deliciously flaky dessert that migrated to Macau and became a local favorite.The first time I tried Portuguese Custard Tarts, or pasteis de nata, wasn’t in Portugal, but in Macau.Macau is a former Portuguese colony, handed back to China in 1999, and just an hour’s ferry ride away from Hong Kong.The first time I sampled these amazing custard tarts was at Lord Stow’s bakery at the Venetian Hotel in Macau.Recently, our family visited Macau looking for things to do (read: places to eat) and one of our stops was Margaret Café e Nata to try their version of Portuguese Custard Tarts.I have to say, there was a lot of experimentation involved in this recipe, but we’ve ironed out the details to help you get perfect results.So treat yourself, make these Portuguese Custard Tarts at home, and take a mini trip to Macau in your kitchen.Make and use your own homemade puff pastry for that signature buttery flavor of Portuguese custard tarts you find in Macau!Start with 6 pieces first, wrap the rest up, and put them back in the refrigerator or freezer to keep them chilled.This short video below shows the process of rolling the puff pastry disc of dough, pressing it into the tin and shaping the rim of the dough around the tin so the pastry will hold that delicious custard securely while baking.Place over medium-low heat, continuing to whisk until the mixture begins to coat the sides of the pan.When the custard is thick enough to coat a spoon, remove from the heat and continue to whisk, ensuring you scrape the sides of the pan.Set aside to cool completely, pressing plastic wrap onto the surface of the custard so a skin does not form on top.Place the frozen puff pastry shells on a sheet pan (you can line it with parchment paper for easy cleanup).When baking is complete, remove the custard tarts from the oven (leaving them in the tins), and place on a rack to cool.Once they are cool enough to handle, remove the custard tarts from the tins and enjoy them warm, perhaps with a mug of milk tea! .

Portugese Custard Tarts

Portugese Custard Tarts

Portugese Custard Tarts

STEP 4 Put custard in a glass/ceramic bowl to cool and cover with cling film to prevent skin forming. .

Pastel de Nata Recipe (Portuguese Custard Tarts)

Pastel de Nata Recipe (Portuguese Custard Tarts)

Pastel de Nata Recipe (Portuguese Custard Tarts)

Because there’s something addictive about the combo of blistered, caramelized custard and flaky golden brown puff pastry.For a real classic taste, serve the pastéis warm, dusted with cinnamon.Key Ingredients: Egg yolks, milk, flour, salt, cinnamon, sugar, water, lemon, vanilla, and puff pastry.Custard : Use a pastry thermometer for best results (if you like to make sweets or fried foods, this is a great investment!: Use a pastry thermometer for best results (if you like to make sweets or fried foods, this is a great investment!).I find that good quality puff pastry dough works very well.I find that good quality puff pastry dough works very well.Combine the sugar, water, vanilla extract, lemon zest, and cinnamon stick in a saucepan and cook at a medium heat until a thermometer reads 220°F (100°C).Steps 3-4: In a separate saucepan, whisk the milk, flour, and salt together until well combined.Steps 7-8: Remove the cinnamon stick from the sugar syrup and slowly add to the mixture.Steps 13-14: Fill each cup of dough 3/4 of the way to the top with custard and bake at 550°F (290°C) (or the highest your oven goes) for about 10-12 minutes.You want the custard to brown and even blacken a bit on top — this is a sign of a true pastel de nata!While you can freeze pasteis de nata, these Portuguese custard tarts are much better when eaten immediately.If you must freeze them, use them within one month and let them come to room temperature before you pop them in a hot oven (400°F/200°C) for a minute or two.But make sure they come to room temperature before enjoying the next day (or feel free to pop into the oven for a quick warm up).A custard tart is perfect any time of day — breakfast, snack, dessert… but always with a cup of coffee!But I have spent lots of time in our neighboring country and LOVE Portuguese cuisine and culture.Broas de Mel: A typical Portuguese pastry with local honey.The famous pasteis de nata come from a small monastery outside of Lisbon, but this recipe gets you as close to the authentic original as possible.▢ Optional ground cinnamon for dusting on top Instructions Preheat your oven to 550°F (290°C), and lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin.In a saucepan, bring to a boil the sugar, water, vanilla extract, lemon zest, and cinnamon stick.Cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, for about 5 minutes or until well combined and the milk is thickened.Put the tray in the oven and bake until the custard starts to caramelize and blister and the pastry goes golden brown (roughly 10-12 minutes).Serve warm, with powdered sugar and ground cinnamon (both optional, but delicious)! .

Pastéis de Nata (Portuguese Custard Tarts)

Pastéis de Nata (Portuguese Custard Tarts)

Pastéis de Nata (Portuguese Custard Tarts)

Pastéis de Nata Recipe Crispy-crunchy pastry crust with a smooth and creamy custard filling is what awaits your bite into these traditional, world famous sweet custard tarts from Lisbon, Portugal!On our most recent trip to Lisbon, Portugal we made it a point to sample (as many as we could fit!).the city’s famous pastry that The Guardian designated as among the world’s “50 best things to eat.” Today I’m sharing a traditional Pastéis de Nata recipe featuring the finest texture and best balance of flavors.The pastry was created sometime prior to the 18th century by Catholic monks of the Jerónimos Monastery.You can freeze them in an airtight container or in freezer bags for up to 3 months, however they don’t thaw well.Like most products with dairy, the fats and water thaw at different rates leaving you with soggy pastry crust and custard that has split.So while you can freeze them if you find you have more than you can eat, just know that the texture won’t be nearly as good as freshly baked.Pasteis de Nata are best eaten warm (or cold) the same day they are baked.They’re best enjoyed warm within a few hours of baking when the pastry is nice and crispy and the custard is delicately smooth and creamy.Place the water, sugar, cinnamon and lemon rind in a medium saucepan and bring it to a boil.Reduce the heat to medium and let it simmer – without stirring – until it reachers 220 degrees F on an instant read thermometer.Turn off the heat and add the flour and salt to the hot milk and whisk constantly until the mixture is nice and thick.In a thin, steady stream pour the syrup into the egg/flour mixture, whisking constantly.On a lightly floured work surface, roll the pastry dough out to roughly a 11×14 inch rectangle.Those lovely layers are going to make your tart pastry beautifully crisp and flaky.Serve with a dusting of powdered sugar and a small pinch of cinnamon if desired.1 teaspoon quality pure vanilla extract Instructions Make the Custard: Place the water, sugar, cinnamon and lemon rind in a medium saucepan and bring it to a boil.Reduce the heat to medium and let it simmer - without stirring - until it reachers 220 degrees F on an instant read thermometer.Turn off the heat and add the flour and salt to the hot milk and whisk constantly until the mixture is nice and thick.In a thin, steady stream pour the syrup into the egg/flour mixture, whisking constantly.Assemble the Tarts: Preheat the oven to the highest temperature it will go (I heated mine to 525 degrees F).Serve with a dusting of powdered sugar and a small pinch of cinnamon if desired. .

Best Pastel De Nata Recipe

Best Pastel De Nata Recipe

Best Pastel De Nata Recipe

In an easy-to-pour container, whisk together the egg yolks, sweetened condensed milk, and vanilla.Combine the milk, heavy cream, sugar, and flour in a pot and set over medium-low heat.Whisking constantly, cook until the mixture starts to simmer and thickens slightly, about 5 minutes.Placing cold butter (cut into chunks) in the oven with the lights on for about 1 hour does the trick for me.Knead together the flour, salt, water, and 1/2 tablespoon of the butter for 3 to 5 minutes, until a smooth dough forms.Rub the little bit of butter that's left inside the bowl on the exterior of the roll, cut into 14 disks about 1/3 inch (8 millimeters) thick, then place in the center of a 2 ⅞-inch tart mold.Dip your thumbs in water, then start by smoothing the cut side of the dough outwards to fit the mold, then push it from the center outwards, until the dough is pushed up slightly higher than the rim of the mold. .

Paul Hollywood's Pastéis de Nata - The Great British Bake Off

Paul Hollywood's Pastéis de Nata - The Great British Bake Off

Paul Hollywood's Pastéis de Nata - The Great British Bake Off

Gradually add enough chilled water (about 4–6 tablespoons) to form a dough.Wrap the dough in cling film and leave to rest in the fridge for 30 minutes.Roll and fold the pastry twice more, each time wrapping the dough in cling film and leaving it to rest in the fridge for 30 minutes.Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured work surface to a rectangle measuring 20 x 30cm.Dissolve the sugar in 185ml of water in a small pan over a low heat.Then, increase the heat and boil until a drop of syrup placed in a glass of water forms a thread (or it reaches 106–112°C/223–234°F on the sugar thermometer).Put the egg yolks in a large bowl and strain the milk mixture over the top, whisking to combine.Pour the custard into the pastry cases, leaving a 1cm gap at the top, then bake for 15–18 minutes, until the pastry is golden and crisp and the custard is bubbling with tiny brown spots. .

A Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe You Can Make in a Muffin Pan

A Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe You Can Make in a Muffin Pan

A Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe You Can Make in a Muffin Pan

Its creamy sweet custard is perfumed with cinnamon, vanilla, or lemon, baked in a shatteringly crisp pastry shell, and eaten by the dozen all over the world.(Macanese tarts look very similar to pastel de nata but are usually less sweet, more eggy, and often the crust is made with lard.).Over in Portugal, bakeries there make a dough called massa folhada, Portugal’s equivalent to France’s puff pastry (pâte feuilletée) and hand press them into individual pastel de nata pans that are baked in 800° ovens to get those flaky layers and the brûléed tops.After a lot of trial and error, I found that the tarts baked best in a 500° oven on the top rack on a preheated sheet pan.The preheated sheet pan instantly heats the bottom of the muffin tin, melts the butter between the layers of dough, and begins to “fry” the crust.The simple syrup and the flour in the custard keep the eggs from separating in the high heat and give those beautiful brûlée marks on the top (no torch necessary!).The recipe for the crust makes 24 shells so you have enough for a second batch of pastéis (plural of pastel) or your favorite mini quiches! .

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