How To Make Yogurt More Tart
Tart

How To Make Yogurt More Tart

  • October 17, 2021

Our yogurt method is based on the principles in Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking, and on the research by professors W.J.Yogurt made from milk kept below 170 ºF / 77 ºC is thinner and tastes fresh, a little fruity and more tart, while yogurt made from milk held at 195 ºF / 90 ºC for 10 minutes is noticeably thicker and tastes less tart and somewhat creamy/nutty/eggy.The casein (protein) clusters in milk thicken yogurt by unraveling and forming a three-dimensional mesh when exposed to the lactic acid created by culturing.But it was a favorite among some of our tasters, and it’s good to know that if you accidentally heat the milk hot enough to produce a few bubbles, nothing bad will happen to your yogurt.Higher temperatures and longer culturing times can cause a lumpy texture and excessive whey separation (similar to the spoon on right on the photo).We tested an 86 ºF / 30 ºC culture and found that it makes perfect, smooth yogurt.However, a temperature that low takes a very long time (12-18 hours) and made us a little uneasy about food safety.Then as culturing progresses and the rising acidity begins to inhibit any potentially problematic microbes, we turn down the Proofer to 86 ºF / 30 ºC.Yogurt cultures that included L. Casei tended to have more viscosity and set up faster than those that didn’t.

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Homemade yogurt -- too tart

Homemade yogurt -- too tart

Homemade yogurt -- too tart

I've just begun making yogurt at home.I tried my first batch last night and it turned out too tart.Incubated overnight in Salton yogurt maker.One important question I have... does incubating longer -- like nearly 9 hours in my case -- make the yogurt more tart? .

Homemade Yogurt Recipe Recipe

Homemade Yogurt Recipe Recipe

Homemade Yogurt Recipe Recipe

The good news is that making yogurt is incredibly easy—as long as you keep your tools clean and don't jiggle the mixture while it's setting, it's almost foolproof.Alternatively, you might use a covered container, set in a conventional oven (preferably with the light on), a microwave, a cooler (place jars of hot water inside to help maintain a warm environment), or a slow cooker (preheat the slow cooker but turn it off to incubate). .

Tart Frozen Yogurt

Tart Frozen Yogurt

Tart Frozen Yogurt

This homemade frozen yogurt is so good, and so similar to your favorite fro-yo, it’s worth buying an ice cream machine just so you can make it whenever you want.The recipe for tart frozen yogurt is unbelievably simple: yogurt, sugar, and honey — that’s it!What You’ll Need To Make Tart Frozen Yogurt.How To Make Tart Frozen Yogurt.Serve right away or stash in the freezer until you’re ready to serve. .

Yogurt, an excerpt from 'The Art of Fermentation'

Yogurt, an excerpt from 'The Art of Fermentation'

Yogurt, an excerpt from 'The Art of Fermentation'

The Art of Fermentation.To make yogurt, you need a starter culture.Also, fill the jars in which you will make the yogurt, as well as your incubator if you are using an insulated cooler, with warm water, so they can pre-warm and will not later cool your yogurt mixture once it reaches target temperature.After heating the milk, you must allow it to cool before adding the starter culture.You may simply leave the pot of heated milk to slowly cool, monitoring it periodically so you can add cultures as soon as the temperature drops to 115°F/46°C.Stir the milk in the pot, as well as the water around it, for rapid cooling.I have heard of people fermenting yogurt for as long as 24 hours.At lower temperatures, coagulation will take longer, and the end result will probably not be quite as thick. .

Super Tart Lemon Curd

Super Tart Lemon Curd

Super Tart Lemon Curd

I was looking for a way to make my lemon curd even more tart recognizing that sugar is essential to the consistency of the recipes.Using a double boiler, combine the egg yolks, sugar, lemon juice, and zest in a metal or glass heat-resistant bowl and whisk until smooth.Set the bowl over the simmering water, without letting the bottom touch, and continue to whisk.Remove the bowl from heat and whisk in the butter, a couple of chunks at a time, until melted. .

Homemade Dairy-free Coconut Yogurt

Homemade Dairy-free Coconut Yogurt

Homemade Dairy-free Coconut Yogurt

This delicious, super simple homemade coconut yogurt recipe is made with just 3 ingredients and yields a perfectly thick and tangy dairy-free yogurt!Maybe not 500 attempts but certainly A LOT – so here’s hoping you all love this recipe as much as I do now!I know I’ve probably made that sound a lot scarier than it really is but, luckily, once you’ve found the correct method, it really is a breeze to make your own gut-healthy, rich, creamy dairy-free coconut yogurt and with only 3 ingredients!A few tips for making Coconut Yogurt.Lastly, you can actually use a 2 tBsp of store-bought unflavoured yogurt as a yogurt starter too.I’ve found that using a store-bought plain yogurt as a yogurt starter works well.Not only that but it’s such a super simple process with just 3 ingredients, and unlike store-bought yogurts, you’ll know exactly what’s in the yogurt so there are no additional ‘nasties’ like many store-bought options have.How to make this Dairy-free Coconut Yogurt recipe.For this coconut yogurt, you only need three ingredients; coconut milk, corn starch and a yogurt starter.I’ve tried this recipe multiple times with various probiotics and methods.Although it can, and has, worked for many people, I’ve found that the best and most consistent results come from using a powder ‘yogurt starter’ or a store-bought yogurt instead of the probiotics.Make sure to set aside 1 tBsp coconut milk to mix the yogurt starter into.If using powder yogurt started, first mix it with 1 tBsp cool coconut milk, then add it to the warm milk. .

Fun with Condensed Milk: Vietnamese Yogurt Recipe

Fun with Condensed Milk: Vietnamese Yogurt Recipe

Fun with Condensed Milk: Vietnamese Yogurt Recipe

Plain yogurt at that time was the polar opposite – so sour it made me pucker and I didn’t touch it after the first try.Years later, French-style Yoplait got me eating yogurt again, but it gradually became sweeter over time and I gave it up.It was on a cold winter morning in the city of Kunming and purchased from a vendor who bicycled through town with a rack of warm yogurt to sell to passersby.The magazine's inquiry spurred me to research and figure out how to make Vietnamese-style yogurt to capture the taste from my youth.In Vietnamese, yogurt is called sữa chua (“su-aw chu-ah” means sour milk) or da ua (“yah u-ah” is a transliteration of the French yaourt).The fresh milk method is pretty much in line with traditional western approaches to homemade yogurt.Note that the already made yogurt acts as a starter by introducing a bunch of live, active cultures to the mix.For one, you don’t have to worry about getting super fresh milk, which is hard to obtain in tropical Vietnam.You can eat Vietnamese yogurt morning, noon, and night as a snack or dessert.When traveling in Vietnam, you’ll notice that there’s often yogurt offered at the hotel breakfast buffet.Vietnamese delis and bakeries abroad often sell yogurt in plastic lidded cups in their refrigerator cases.Compared to commercial yogurt in the West, the Vietnamese variety is thinner but certainly not lacking in nuanced flavor.I’ve been toying with this homemade Vietnamese yogurt recipe for a week, and it’s so easy and foolproof that I can hardly stand it.In my kitchen, I found that using a lidded pot works just fine, and that 6 hours is what I needed for the yogurt to develop a slight tang.The Old Man brand (like Borden’s) is full-fat and rich tasting and the organic yogurt is full of active, live cultures.If you’d like to measure the ingredients the western way, a 14-ounce can of condensed milk holds 1 1/3 cups.That means you use between 2/3 and 1 1/3 cups of yogurt for the starter. .

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