Is Tart Cherry Juice A Natural Diuretic
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Is Tart Cherry Juice A Natural Diuretic

  • December 4, 2021

Tart cherry juice is made from the fruit of the Prunus cerasus tree, native to southwest Asia and Europe, and is linked to a number of interesting health benefits.In another study, runners given 16 ounces (480 ml) of cherry juice in the days leading up to and immediately following a marathon experienced less muscle damage, soreness and inflammation.One group of men was given tart cherry supplements or a placebo in the days leading up to and immediately following an intense resistance training session.The tart cherry group lost up to 4% less muscle strength as a result of the training when compared to men given the placebo ( 10 ).Summary: Tart cherry juice intake in the days leading up to and immediately following intense physical exercise may reduce muscle strength loss and soreness.Moreover, tart cherries contain a good amount of tryptophan and anthocyanins, two compounds that may help the body create melatonin and lengthen its effects.Research shows that supplementing with tart cherry juice increases levels of melatonin and helps improve sleep quality and duration ( 14 ).In one study, tart cherry juice reduced certain blood markers of inflammation in women with osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis (16).In another study, patients who consumed two 8-ounce (240-ml) bottles of tart cherry juice daily experienced slightly less pain and stiffness after six weeks ( 17 ).Studies have also looked at the effect of tart cherry juice on gout, a type of arthritis accompanied by repeated attacks of swelling and intense pain.Drinking tart cherry juice seems to reduce blood levels of uric acid — a chemical that can trigger gout when present in too high concentrations (18).Tart cherries and their juice contain large amounts of antioxidants and other beneficial plant compounds that may have protective effects on brain cells ( 21 ).In one study, consuming 16 ounces (480 ml) of tart cherry juice daily improved antioxidant defenses in healthy older men and women ( 22 ).In another study, older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia consumed either 6.5 ounces (200 ml) of tart cherry juice or a placebo for 12 weeks.Summary: The high antioxidant levels in tart cherry juice may help improve brain function and reduce symptoms of mild-to-moderate dementia.For instance, one study researched the effect of this juice on upper respiratory tract symptoms commonly experienced by marathon runners after a race.A group of runners drank tart cherry juice in the days leading up to and immediately following a marathon race while another consumed a placebo.Additionally, this juice is safe for most people, though it contains high amounts of sorbitol — a type of sugar alcohol that can cause stomach pain and diarrhea for some.Individuals on medications should consult a doctor before adding large amounts of tart cherry juice to their diet. .

Health Benefits of Cherry Juice for Arthritis and Gout

Health Benefits of Cherry Juice for Arthritis and Gout

Health Benefits of Cherry Juice for Arthritis and Gout

Tart cherries seem to have more phenolic compounds while sweet cherries contain more anthocyanins.Tart Cherries for Arthritis A daily dose of tart cherries (as cherry extract) has significant effects on markers of inflammation in people with osteoarthritis, although studies have not shown pain relief significantly better than placebos..All of these nutritional compounds make tart cherry juice a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory food and potential adjunct therapy for people with arthritis and gout.: 19.2 milligrams Total carbohydrates : 32 grams 11% DV.: 32 grams 11% DV Dietary fiber : 0.96 grams 4% DV.: 0.96 grams 4% DV Sugars : 24 grams.Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis.Study participants drank 10.5 ounces of Montmorency cherry juice or placebo drink twice daily for three weeks.A 2013 study looked at tart cherry juice’s effect in people with osteoarthritis.How Much Cherry Juice for Arthritis?According to these studies, 8-10 ounces of tart cherry juice taken twice daily may achieve lower markers of inflammation in osteoarthritis.Cherry Juice for Gout.Tart cherry juice was evaluated for its ability to decrease uric acid levels and inflammatory markers in people with gout in a small 2011 study of ten participants.Study participants were randomized to drink 8 ounces of either tart cherry juice or a placebo drink daily for 4 weeks, followed by a 4 week washout period, then proceeded with another 4 weeks of drinking the alternate beverage.A 2019 review of six studies that looked at the effect of cherries (as extract or juice) as a complementary treatment for gout and uric acid levels concluded that there is an association between cherry intake and a reduced risk of gout attacks.However, the authors noted that more comprehensive studies with longer-term follow-up are needed to fully determine the effectiveness of cherry consumption for people with gout or high uric acid levels.With the small number of participants in these few studies and the short-term follow-up, along with the mixed results, larger long-term studies are warranted to clarify the effects of tart cherry juice in people with gout. .

7 Benefits of Cherry Juice: Inflammation, Immunity, and More

7 Benefits of Cherry Juice: Inflammation, Immunity, and More

7 Benefits of Cherry Juice: Inflammation, Immunity, and More

We include products we think are useful for our readers.You will also see juice “from concentrate” and “not from concentrate.” Both options are nutritionally similar.Anthocyanins promote anti-inflammatory processes in the body.Helps post-workout recovery Cherry juice may help recovery post-exercise.Fights inflammation and arthritis pain Research shows that the antioxidants in tart cherry juice can reduce pain and inflammation from osteoarthritis (OA).Reduces swelling When people experience pain from swelling, they often turn to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).A 2004 study found that cherry juice supplements can reduce inflammation and pain-related behavior in animals, showing promise as a treatment for swelling in humans. .

Pros and Cons of Tart Cherry Juice

Cherries have antioxidant compounds that may help reduce inflammation to prevent chronic disease, treat gout symptoms, and help with muscle pain and stamina during your workout.Most studies in nutritional science choose to examine the Montmorency tart cherry for its potential health benefits.Nutritional Benefits.Pro: Per cup, tart cherry juice has 159 calories with very little fat — 1.45 grams.Con: Cherry juice is not a good source of protein with 0.83 gram per cup.Con: Lack of Fiber.In addition, fiber can help lower your blood cholesterol level and reduce your risk for heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes, according to the American Heart Association.Con: High Sugar Content.Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol that either naturally occurs in fruits, especially cherries, or is semi-artificially produced and added as a low-calorie sweetener to cherry juice and other commercial foods.The healthy types of carbs in cherry juice are important in your diet to provide your body with glucose, which is converted to energy used to support bodily functions and physical activity.Dietary Guidelines recommends that your intake of carbs amount to no less than 130 grams per day.Pro: Relief From Gout Pain.Cherry juice contains antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents that have been shown to alleviate the pain associated with gout.Another review in the same study found patients with gout who consumed 10 to 12 cherries for two days had a 35 percent reduced chance of subsequent gout attacks.The use of cherry juice for headaches or other soreness may be a more natural alternative to pain relief.Pro: A Good Night's Sleep.In addition, sleep insomnia is associated with an increased prevalence of other disorders, including hypertension, Type 2 diabetes and a decline in cognitive function.Conclusions of the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, reported that the phenolic acids in cherry juice were possibly responsible for the beneficial reduction in blood pressure. .

Does Tart Cherry Juice Really Have Health Benefits? Urology of

Does Tart Cherry Juice Really Have Health Benefits? Urology of

Does Tart Cherry Juice Really Have Health Benefits? Urology of

Tart (or sour) cherry juice has developed quite a reputation as an arthritis cure, anti-inflammatory agent, and even a natural sleeping aid.And lately, thanks to their growing reputation as a health food, tart cherry extracts and powders are also showing up in the supplement aisle.Anthocyanins have beenlinked with a wide range of health benefits—everything from improved lung and brain function to reduced risk of heart disease and cancer.Human studies using tart cherry juice have also been linked to benefits including reduced oxidative stress, inflammation, and arthritis pain.In addition, there’s been quite a bit of research looking at the effect of tart cherry juice or concentrate on elite athletes.Results suggest that by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress, tart cherry products can help to eliminate post-workout muscle soreness.But, for me, the design of the studies leaves an important unanswered question: Are tart cherries more beneficial than any other antioxidant-rich fruit or vegetable?In terms of reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, I suspect that whatever benefits you get from tart cherries would be available from other anthocyanin-rich fruits and vegetables as well.High fruit and vegetable intake is, in fact, linked withreduced inflammation and oxidative stress and reduced arthritis pain.Whole fruits and vegetables are much more filling than juice or powder, in part because of the fiber but also due to the physical action of chewing them and the time it takes to consume them.In my experience, when people start eating more whole fruits and vegetables, they tend to have less room on their plates and in their stomachs for junk food and empty calories.However, a few small studies that have looked at the effects of cherry juice concentrate or powders on sleep quality produced only modest or negligible benefits.And the best way to ensure a healthy dose of plant-nutrition is not to pop a pill or swig a juice, but to focus on getting those five servings of vegetables a day, in addition to whatever fruit you enjoy. .

5 Things You Need To Know About Tart Cherries

5 Things You Need To Know About Tart Cherries

5 Things You Need To Know About Tart Cherries

In addition to being a delicious snack, juice and ingredient… we love tart cherries because of the array of health benefits they promote!From improving sleep, to decreasing muscle pain and inflammation, over 50 studies show that tart cherries are a powerful source of beneficial nutrition.BETTER SLEEP.Research shows that Montmorency tart cherry juice may help improve the quality and length of sleep, as well as reduce insomnia.Loss of sleep doesn’t just affect your productivity for the day, it can also cause weight gain and other health problems.Tart cherries are a natural source of melatonin, which is a hormone that regulates of the body’s internal clock and sleep-wake cycle.Drink tart cherry juice or concentrate before bed or simply take a tart cherry supplement each day, and start making sleep a priority.Montmorency tart cherries are rich in polyphenols, and studies suggest that incorporating these into your diet may help enhance gut health.So start enjoying the benefits and deliciousness of tart cherries and be good to your gut!Tart cherry juice is becoming the go-to recovery drink after exercise for athletes!Tart cherries are a rich source of antioxidants and are packed with anti-inflammatory properties.Drink a 10-ounce glass of Montmorency tart cherry juice before workouts.Tart Tip Tart cherries are the perfect ingredient to your smoothies or healthy snacks!All of these correlate with heart disease.ARTHRITIS AND GOUT Research shows that antioxidants in tart cherries can reduce inflammation related to arthritis and gout!Check out what our researchers found when studying the benefits of tart cherries on those with arthritis and gout! .

SOUR CHERRY: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions

Bak I, Lekli I, Juhasz B, et al. Cardioprotective mechanisms of Prunus cerasus (sour cherry) seed extract against ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage in isolated rat hearts.Bell PG, Gaze DC, Davison GW, et al. Montmorency tart cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) concentrate lowers uric acid, independent of plasma cyaniding-3-O-glucosiderutinoside.Bell PG, Stevenson E, Davison GW, Howatson G. The effects of Montmorency tart cherry concentrate supplementation on recovery following prolonged, intermittent exercise.Bell PG, Walshe IH, Davison GW, et al. Montmorency cherries reduce the oxidative stress and inflammatory responses to repeated days high-intensity stochastic cycling.Bell PG, Walshe IH, Davison GW, et al. Recovery facilitation with Montmorency cherries following high-intensity, metabolically challenging exercise.Bobe G, Wang B, Seeram NP, et al.

Dietary anthocyanin-rich tart cherry extract inhibits intestinal tumorigenesis in APC(Min) mice fed suboptimal levels of sulindac.Bonerz D, Wurth K, Dietrich H, et al. Analytical characterization and the impact of ageing on anthocyanin composition and degradation in juices from five sour cherry cultivars.Bowtell JL, Sumners DP, Dyer A, et al.

Montmorency cherry juice reduces muscle damage caused by intensive strength exercise.Brown MA, Stevenson EJ, Howatson G. Montmorency tart cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) supplementation accelerates recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage in females.Detection and quantification of the antioxidant melatonin in Montmorency and Balaton tart cherries (Prunus cerasus).Effect of Montmorency tart cherry juice on cognitive performance in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.Connolly DA, McHugh MP, Padilla-Zakour OI, et al.

Efficacy of a tart cherry juice blend in preventing the symptoms of muscle damage.Orally delivered sour cherry seed extract (SCSE) affects cardiovascular and hematological parameters in humans.Czompa A, Gyongyosi A, Czegledi A, et al. Cardioprotection afforded by sour cherry seed kernel: the role of heme oxygenase-1.Desai T, Roberts M, Bottoms L.

Effects of short-term continuous Montmorency tart cherry juice supplementation in participants with metabolic syndrome.Influence of a Montmorency cherry juice blend on indices of exercise-induced stress and upper respiratory tract symptoms following marathon running-a pilot investigation.U.S. Montmorency Tart Cherry Juice Decreases Bone Resorption in Women Aged 65-80 Years.Elliot DL, Kuehl KS, Jones KD, Dulacki K.

Using an eccentric exercise-testing protocol to assess the beneficial effects of tart cherry juice in fibromyalgia patients.Hill JA, Keane KM, Quinlan R, Howatson G. Tart Cherry Supplementation and Recovery From Strenuous Exercise: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.Hillman AR, Uhranowsky K. Acute Ingestion of Montmorency Tart Cherry Reduces Serum Uric Acid but Has no Impact on High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein or Oxidative Capacity.Sour cherry extract inhibits human salivary a-amylase and growth of Streptococcus mutans (a pilot clinical study).Hooper DR, Orange T, Gruber MT, Darakjian AA, Conway KL, Hausenblas HA.Broad Spectrum Polyphenol Supplementation from Tart Cherry Extract on Markers of Recovery from Intense Resistance Exercise.Howatson G, Bell PG, Tallent J, et al.

Effect of tart cherry juice (Prunus cerasus) on melatonin levels and enhanced sleep quality.Effects of Montmorency Tart Cherry Juice Consumption on Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.Juhasz B, Kertesz A, Balla J, et al. Cardioprotective effects of sour cherry seed extract (SCSE) on the hypercholesterolemic rabbit heart.Tart cherry anthocyanins inhibit tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and reduce proliferation of human colonic cancer cells.Keane KM, Bailey SJ, Vanhatalo A, Jones AM, Howatson G. Effects of Montmorency tart cherry (L.

Prunus Cerasus) consumption on nitric oxide biomarkers and exercise performance.Keane KM, Bell PG, Lodge JK, et al. Phytochemical uptake following human consumption of Montmorency tart cherry (L. Prunus cerasus) and influence of phenolic acids on vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.Effects of Montmorency tart cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) consumption on vascular function in men with early hypertension.Jam processing effect on phenolics and antioxidant capacity in anthocyanin-rich fruits: cherry, plum, and raspberry.Kimble R, Keane KM, Lodge JK, Howatson G.

The Influence of Tart Cherry (Prunus cerasus, cv Montmorency) Concentrate Supplementation for 3 Months on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Middle-Aged Adults: A Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Trial.Kirakosyan A, Seymour EM, Urcuyo Llanes DE, et al. Chemical profile and antioxidant capacities of tart cherry products.Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial.Kupusarevic J, McShane K, Clifford T. Cherry gel supplementation does not attenuate subjective muscle soreness or alter wellbeing following a match in a team of professional rugby union players: a pilot study.Effects of powdered Montmorency tart cherry supplementation on acute bout of intense lower body strength exercise in resistance trained males.Effects of powdered Montmorency tart cherry supplementation on acute endurance exercise performance in aerobically trained individuals.Lynn A, Mathew S, Moore CT, et al.

Effect of a tart cherry juice supplement on arterial stiffness and inflammation in healthy adults: a randomised controlled trial.Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) seed extract increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and decreases proinflammatory signaling in peripheral blood human leukocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients.Sour cherry seed kernel extract increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and decreases representation of CD3+TNF-alpha+ and CD3+IL-8+ subpopulations in peripheral blood leukocyte cultures from type 2 diabetes patients.Mulabagal V, Lang GA, DeWitt DL, et al. Anthocyanin content, lipid peroxidation and cyclooxygenase enzyme inhibitory activities of sweet and sour cherries.Piccolella S, Fiorentino A, Pacifico S, et al. Antioxidant properties of sour cherries (Prunus cerasus L.): role of colorless phytochemicals from the methanolic extract of ripe fruits.Effects of a tart cherry juice beverage on the sleep of older adults with insomnia: a pilot study.Improved antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential in mice consuming sour cherry juice (Prunus cerasus cv.Schumacher HR, Pullman-Mooar S, Gupta SR, et al.

Randomized double-blind crossover study of the efficacy of a tart cherry juice blend in treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.Seymour EM, Warber SM, Kirakosyan A, et al. Anthocyanin pharmacokinetics and dose-dependent plasma antioxidant pharmacodynamics following whole tart cherry intake in healthy humans.Lack of effect of tart cherry concentrate dose on serum urate in people with gout.Tall JM, Seeram EM, Zhao C, et al. Tart cherry anthocyanins suppress inflammation-induced pain behavior in rat.Traustadottir T, Davies SS, Stock AA, et al.

Tart cherry juice decreases oxidative stress in healthy older men and women.Wang H, Nair MG, Strasburg GM, et al. Antioxidant and antiiinflammatory activities of anthocyanins and their aglycon, cyaniding, from tart cherries.

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5 benefits of cherries for gout, sleep, nutrition, and more

5 benefits of cherries for gout, sleep, nutrition, and more

5 benefits of cherries for gout, sleep, nutrition, and more

Some evidence suggests that they may also help lower inflammation, protect heart health, and improve sleep as part of a healthy diet.This article will look at the scientific evidence for the health benefits of cherries, their nutritional profile, and how people can get more cherries in their diet.Although a diet that is generally high in fruits, vegetables, and fiber can help lower inflammation, cherries may be particularly beneficial as part of an anti-inflammatory diet.This applied to both tart and sweet varieties of cherry, and it included cherry fruits, juices, and concentrates.Benefits for sleep According to a 2013 study , cherries are a rich, natural source of melatonin, which is a neurotransmitter that influences sleep and mood.Among the participants who consumed the cherry-based product, sleep and nocturnal rest significantly improved.A 2020 meta-analysis involved participants who consumed tart cherry concentrate as a powder or juice for 7 days until 1.5 hours before exercising.powder To incorporate more cherries into a healthy diet, people can: Add fresh cherries to fruit salads, smoothies, oatmeal, and yogurt. .

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density

Impact of tart cherry juice on systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.Common treatments for high blood pressure (BP) and dyslipidemia include medications, but there is question as to whether natural sources may be adequate to reduce CVD risk factors.We examined the effects of tart cherry juice on lipid profiles, BP, glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in older adults.In this randomized-controlled clinical trial, 17 men and 20 women between the ages of 65–80 years were randomly assigned to consume 480 ml of tart cherry juice or control drink daily for 12 weeks.Neither tart cherry juice nor control significantly altered body weight, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diastolic BP, insulin and HOMA-IR.Our findings show that tart cherry juice can lower the levels of systolic BP and LDL cholesterol.1 Since the number of adults at or above the age of 65 is rapidly increasing and projected to exceed 82 million by the year 2040, CVD can be considered a major health threat.1 Common treatments for high BP and dyslipidemia include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, calcium antagonists, diuretics, and cholesterol-lowering drugs.Administration of antihypertensive agents for a few years to individuals with high blood pressure (BP) can delay transition to hypertension, but long lasting effects of the intervention and cost-effectiveness remain to be proven.Possible side effects include a dry cough, dizziness, bradycardia, peripheral edema and insomnia.These side effects paired with the fact that 84% of adults over the age of 57 are already taking at least one prescription medication per day, warrant the need for a natural remedy for the problem of CVD.Recruiting materials were placed in the local community, including senior living facilities, event halls, churches, and public bulletin boards.Inclusion criteria included men and women between the ages of 65–80 years who consumed ≤5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day.Individuals receiving treatment with any medications that may influence brain function or have had any prior diagnosis or history of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, gastrointestinal disease, cancer, central nervous system or psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, or impaired cognitive function were excluded.Additionally, heavy smokers (>20 cigarettes per day) or individuals allergic to tart cherry were excluded from this study.Researchers and personnel, including the biostatistician, were blinded to the groups when measuring BP and anthropometrics, running the assays, and analyzing the data.This study was conducted according to the guidelines laid down in the Declaration of Helsinki and all procedures involving human subjects were approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Delaware.Control drink was prepared by mixing unsweetened black cherry flavored Kool-Aid (Kraft Foods, United States) with water.In addition, participants were given customized calendars and were asked to mark the days they missed consuming the study regimen and to return any unused portion for compliance monitoring purposes.Collected food records were analyzed using Nutrition Data System for Research software (NDSR, Minneapolis, MN).Mean ± SD Mean ± SD Age, years 69.5 ± 3.9 70.0 ± 3.7 0.65 Body height, cm 169.6 ± 7.9 165.5 ± 6.8 0.25 Body mass, kg 78.7 ± 13.5 78.0 ± 10.3 0.56 BMI, kg cm −2 27.3 ± 4.2 28.5 ± 3.7 0.34 n (%) n (%) Sex, male/female 9/8 (53/47) 8/12 (40/60) 0.43 Education Level 0.63 Completed high school 5 (29) 5 (25) 2-year college degree 1 (6) 4 (20) 4-year college degree 6 (36) 7 (35) Higher education 5 (29) 4 (20) Income 0.05 Under 25 000 0 (0) 3 (15) 25 000–49 999 1 (6) 0 (0) 50 000–74 999 2 (12) 8 (40) 75 000–99 999 3 (18) 0 (0) Over 100 000 8 (46) 5 (25) Prefer not to say 3 (18) 4 (20) Race 0.37 Asian 0 (0) 2 (10) Black or African American 2 (12) 1 (5) White 15 (88) 16 (80) Prefer not to say 0 (0) 1 (5) Marital status 0.87 Single never married 1 (6) 2 (10) Separated/divorced 3 (18) 4 (20) Married 13 (76) 14 (70) Employment status 0.01 Retired 15 (88) 10 (50) Working 2 (12) 10 (50).As a result, centered baseline physical activity score and dietary cholesterol and the terms of their interaction with the intervention variable were included in the ANCOVA model.Table 3 Anthropometric, blood pressure, glucose, and lipid profiles in older adults at baseline and 12 weeks after supplementation with tart cherry juice or control drink.Table 4 Dietary intake and physical activity in older adults at baseline and 12 weeks after supplementation with tart cherry juice or control drink.Baseline levels of systolic and diastolic BP were not statistically different between tart cherry and control groups ( Table 3 ).Baseline levels of TC, HDL, LDL, and TG were not statistically different between tart cherry and control groups ( Table 3 ).et al. demonstrated that consumption of 40 g concentrated tart cherry juice for six weeks significantly reduced both systolic and diastolic BP in individuals with type 2 diabetes.et al. conducted a 6-week open label trial where healthy participants between the ages of 30–50 consumed 30 ml of a Montmorency tart cherry concentrate or a control beverage.They found that six weeks consumption of 30 ml tart cherry concentrate daily had no effects on arterial stiffness and BP.For instance, Ataie-Jafari 21 demonstrated that consumption of 40 g concentrated tart cherry juice for six weeks significantly reduced both systolic and diastolic BP in individuals with type 2 diabetes.Keane 22 demonstrated that 60 ml Montmorency tart cherry juice concentrate acutely lowered systolic BP over a period of three hours in younger men with early hypertension compared to control group.However, Lynn 25 conducted a 6-week open label trial where healthy participants between the ages of 30–50 consumed 30 ml of a Montmorency tart cherry concentrate or a control beverage.They found that six weeks consumption of 30 ml tart cherry concentrate daily had no effects on arterial stiffness and BP.Thus, it can be reasoned that the reduction in systolic BP seen in our present study was due in part to the presence of polyphenolic compounds in the tart cherry juice.Diebolt et al.28 reported a significant reduction in systolic BP following a short-term oral administration of polyphenolic compounds in rats.Another study showed that systolic and diastolic BPs were significantly reduced in adults following eight weeks consumption of drinks containing approximately 837 mg of polyphenols.29 This reduction could be attributable to the action of polyphenolic compounds as determined by bioavailability analysis.The proper functioning of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) is essential to avoid build up of atherosclerotic plaques, as VSMCs are responsible for normal, healthy vasculature tone.Following consumption of the beetroot juice, urinary nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator, was significantly increased resulting in a reduction in systolic and diastolic BPs.Johnson et al.8 also demonstrated that 8 weeks consumption of drinks containing 22 g freeze-dried blueberry significantly decreased systolic and diastolic BPs by 5.1% and 6.3%, respectively, in postmenopausal women.Various studies have shown that across a wide range of baseline intakes (ranging from less than 50 to greater than 80 mmol), increasing potassium intake provides beneficial in reducing systolic BP by 3.39–4.11 mmHg.34–36 A population study conducted by Khaw et al.37 also suggested that an increase in potassium by 20–30 mmol per day (∼700–1200 mg per day), which resulted in a 2 to 3 mmHg reduction in systolic BP.It is unlikely that the tart cherry concentrate used in the present study provided potassium in high enough quantities to elicit significant improvement in BP.Our present study also demonstrated that there was a significant impact of control drink on systolic BP and LDL cholesterol.Systolic BP and LDL cholesterol nonsignificantly increased after 12 weeks of control drink consumption when compared with baseline values.The sugar content of the control drink, which contained fructose may, in part, be responsible for the increase in LDL cholesterol and systolic BP.In a study by Litterio et al.,48 they found that rat fed chow diet supplemented with 10% (w/v) fructose in the drinking water for 4 weeks evidenced significantly increased systolic BP.Our findings suggest that daily incorporation of tart cherry juice or control (∼181 kcal per day) into a diet, without intentional dietary modification during the study, do not significantly affect the total energy intake of older adults.In addition, the analysis of possible confounding variables including dietary intake and physical activity were assessed.Study results could be influenced by various factors such as sample size, the duration of the tart cherry supplementation, and the possibility of under or over reporting dietary intake or differences in physical activity at baseline between groups.In order to eliminate the effects of confounding factors including physical activity and dietary cholesterol, the ANCOVA test was used.Finally, the majority of the research sample was White, married and earned ≥$75 000 per year which limits the generalizability of findings.In conclusion, daily incorporation of tart cherry juice into the diet can lower systolic BP and LDL cholesterol in older adults and could be a plausible intervention for improved cardiovascular health for this population.D. 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