Is Tart Cherry Juice Highly Acidic
Tart

Is Tart Cherry Juice Highly Acidic

  • January 14, 2022

Tart cherry juice is made from the fruit of the Prunus cerasus tree, native to southwest Asia and Europe, and is linked to a number of interesting health benefits.In another study, runners given 16 ounces (480 ml) of cherry juice in the days leading up to and immediately following a marathon experienced less muscle damage, soreness and inflammation.One group of men was given tart cherry supplements or a placebo in the days leading up to and immediately following an intense resistance training session.The tart cherry group lost up to 4% less muscle strength as a result of the training when compared to men given the placebo ( 10 ).Summary: Tart cherry juice intake in the days leading up to and immediately following intense physical exercise may reduce muscle strength loss and soreness.Moreover, tart cherries contain a good amount of tryptophan and anthocyanins, two compounds that may help the body create melatonin and lengthen its effects.Research shows that supplementing with tart cherry juice increases levels of melatonin and helps improve sleep quality and duration ( 14 ).In one study, tart cherry juice reduced certain blood markers of inflammation in women with osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis (16).In another study, patients who consumed two 8-ounce (240-ml) bottles of tart cherry juice daily experienced slightly less pain and stiffness after six weeks ( 17 ).Studies have also looked at the effect of tart cherry juice on gout, a type of arthritis accompanied by repeated attacks of swelling and intense pain.Drinking tart cherry juice seems to reduce blood levels of uric acid — a chemical that can trigger gout when present in too high concentrations (18).Tart cherries and their juice contain large amounts of antioxidants and other beneficial plant compounds that may have protective effects on brain cells ( 21 ).In one study, consuming 16 ounces (480 ml) of tart cherry juice daily improved antioxidant defenses in healthy older men and women ( 22 ).In another study, older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia consumed either 6.5 ounces (200 ml) of tart cherry juice or a placebo for 12 weeks.Summary: The high antioxidant levels in tart cherry juice may help improve brain function and reduce symptoms of mild-to-moderate dementia.For instance, one study researched the effect of this juice on upper respiratory tract symptoms commonly experienced by marathon runners after a race.A group of runners drank tart cherry juice in the days leading up to and immediately following a marathon race while another consumed a placebo.Additionally, this juice is safe for most people, though it contains high amounts of sorbitol — a type of sugar alcohol that can cause stomach pain and diarrhea for some.Individuals on medications should consult a doctor before adding large amounts of tart cherry juice to their diet. .

Is Tart Cherry Juice Good for You? Pros and Cons, Nutrition

Is Tart Cherry Juice Good for You? Pros and Cons, Nutrition

Is Tart Cherry Juice Good for You? Pros and Cons, Nutrition

Although additional research is needed, tart cherry juice appears to improve overall health by reducing inflammation in the body.Studies have shown that potassium may help keep blood pressure in a healthy range and reduce the risk of stroke .However, the same thing that makes tart cherry juice so potent can also create complications for people with certain medical conditions.In a randomized, placebo-controlled study, tart cherry juice significantly reduced inflammation biomarkers that are common in chronic diseases. .

Health Benefits of Cherry Juice for Arthritis and Gout

Health Benefits of Cherry Juice for Arthritis and Gout

Health Benefits of Cherry Juice for Arthritis and Gout

Although preliminary, some studies have suggested that cherry juice could offer benefits as a complementary treatment for arthritis and gout.This article will examine the benefits of tart cherry juice in people with arthritis and gout, weighing the current evidence alongside the potential risks and side effects.Tart cherry juice contains anthocyanins, which are anti-inflammatory compounds responsible for the red, blue, and purple colors of fruits and vegetables.Together, these compounds make tart cherry juice a potentially helpful add-on therapy for people with arthritis and gout.Eight ounces of 100% organic tart cherry juice delivers the following nutritional value and helps meet the recommended daily value (DV) of several key nutrients:.Recap Tart cherry juice is rich in plant-based compounds called anthocyanins and polyphenols, both of which have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.There have been a small handful of clinical trials investigating the effect of tart cherry juice on people with arthritis.A 2012 study in the Journal of Food Science reported that participants with osteoarthritis who drank 10.5 ounces of Montmorency cherry juice twice daily for three weeks had lower markers of inflammation (specifically C-reactive protein) than people given a placebo .Gout is a chronic form of inflammatory arthritis caused by the build-up of uric acid crystals in the joints and tissues (most commonly the big toe).A small 2011 study involving 10 adults with gout found that participants who consumed 8 ounces of tart cherry juice per day for four weeks had less uric acid and pro-inflammatory compounds in their bloodstream than those given a placebo.A 2019 study involving 25 overweight or obese adults at risk of gout reported that those who drank 8 ounces of tart cherry juice every day for four weeks had lower uric acid and C-reactive protein levels than those who were given a placebo.A 2019 review of studies in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine suggested that the more tart cherry juice a person drank, the lower their risk was of having a gout attack.A 2020 study published in the journal Rheumatology looked at the effects of tart cherry juice in 50 adults with gout.Recap Tart cherry juice poses few health risks but may not be suitable for people with diabetes or those on an arthritis-friendly diet due to the high sugar content (24 grams per serving).Some studies have shown that drinking tart cherry juice can reduce inflammation, joint pain, and stiffness in people with osteoarthritis.Tart cherry juice is generally safe to consume, although some people may experience an upset stomach or loose stools. .

Tart Cherry Juice: Nature's Ibuprofen?

Tart Cherry Juice: Nature's Ibuprofen?

Tart Cherry Juice: Nature's Ibuprofen?

Full of anti-oxidants that help block inflammation, the juice from tart, red cherries is supposed to provide all kinds of health benefits, including relief from gout and arthritis, protection against heart disease and cancer, even help with sleeping for older adults.A blogger in the New York Daily News recently called it Mother Nature's ibuprofen after she took it to help with aches and pains from running.They agree that cherries are rich in a type of antioxidant that gives all red, blue and purple fruits and vegetables their deep color, and this does have an anti-inflammatory effect. .

Effect of tart cherry juice on recovery and next day performance in

Effect of tart cherry juice on recovery and next day performance in

Effect of tart cherry juice on recovery and next day performance in

The mean (± SD) physical characteristics of the participants were; age: 18.6 (±1.4) years, body mass: 82.7 (±9.8) kg and Σ 7 skin-folds: 70.7 (±29.7) mm.In the event that the participant was under the age of 18 years, signed consent was obtained from the individuals’ parent or legal guardian.A randomised double-blind, repeated measures, crossover design was employed to assess the influence of the tart CJ supplementation versus the PLA.A 5-week washout period was adopted between the two experimental trials to preclude any follow-on effects, based on comparable previous supplementation regimes [6, 7].No form of physical activity was performed in the preceding 48 h of day 1, with participants arriving at the laboratory at 05:00 am to provide a venous blood sample immediately prior to commencing a standardised warm-up and the testing battery.All training (technical skill, weights, and swimming) performed during the 7-day trials was identical, and took place in the controlled environment of the indoor Water Polo pool or gymnasium.Participants also completed a comprehensive online daily diary for the duration of each experimental trial in order to assess their perceived recovery.On day 6, participants attended the laboratory at 15:45 pm to provide a venous blood sample immediately prior to undertaking a simulated fatiguing team game activity, designed to replicate the demands of a Water Polo match [12].Venous blood samples collected throughout each experimental trial were used to investigate biological markers indicative of the efficacy of CJ.Participants consumed 90 mL daily of tart Montmorency CJ (Prunus Cerasus) concentrate (Cherry Active, Sunbury, UK) or a PLA equivalent for a total of 6 days.As previously highlighted, all four performance tests (VJ, 10 m sprint, RST, WIST) were specifically selected based on their ability to assess important traits of Water Polo [8–10].The 10 m sprint (best of two trials) required participants to swim between two ropes held just above water level at 0 and 10 m (that were raised/lowered by the research team).A digital video camera (Sony HDR-HC9, Japan) filming at 50 Hz was positioned on the opposite side of the pool, with the viewing width set to ensure both start and finish markers were clearly visible.The WIST lasts approximately 14 min in total (for this population) and consists of repeated 2 × 7.5 m shuttles (swims out and back) at progressively increasing speeds, interspaced by 10 s of recovery (treading water) that is controlled by audio signals. .

12 Myths About Gout Arthritis That You Should Stop Believing Now

12 Myths About Gout Arthritis That You Should Stop Believing Now

12 Myths About Gout Arthritis That You Should Stop Believing Now

If you’re not familiar, gout is a type of arthritis that occurs when your body produces too much urate, or uric acid.We spoke to a rheumatologist and a registered dietitian for National Kidney Foundation to help separate the gout fact from fiction.Below, CreakyJoints clears up some common gout myths that can be harmful to patients, and even prevent proper diagnosis and treatment.Uric acid levels tend to be higher in people who are overweight, according to research published on The Rheumatologist, which can increase your risk of gout.Additionally, as Robert Keenan, MD, a rheumatologist with Articularis Healthcare in Summerville, South Carolina, previously told CreakyJoints that, “gout tends to flare in areas that already have arthritis.”.Patients report difficulty sleeping or pain so severe it hurts to even tuck your toe into the bedsheets.To start, gout that has become more progressive can cause clumps of urate crystals and inflammatory cells know as tophi to form under the skin.“As we grow older, the kidneys can’t process as much uric acid,” Puja Khanna, MD, associate professor in the division of rheumatology, previously told CreakyJoints.In one study published in The Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers assessed people being treated for coronary artery disease and found patients with gout had a 15 percent higher risk of either dying of cardiovascular disease or having a heart attack or stroke than patients who never developed gout.All of these potential complications underscore the importance of getting gout properly diagnosed and treated with medication that keeps uric acid at a healthy level and prevents further attacks.You’re more likely to develop gout if you have high levels of uric acid in your body, and your love of certain foods and drinks can raise that risk.Red meat, shellfish, certain seafood (such as anchovies and sardines), and drinks high in fructose have the same effect.A 2018 study published in the journal BMJ found diet has much less influence on urate levels in your blood when compared to inherited genetic variants.So, although that doesn’t mean you can all the steak you want, treating yourself occasionally won’t immediately lead to a gout attack.Gout treatment aims to get your uric acid level to 6 mg/dL or lower to dissolve or prevent crystals, according to the American College of Rheumatology.According to guidelines from the American College of Rheumatology, people with gout who get two or more attacks a year should be on medication to lower uric acid levels.In addition to medication, your doctor may also suggest a few lifestyle changes to reduce your risk of a gout attack and protect your joints.“Exercise, increasing your fluid intake, and losing weight are all helpful to lessen the wear and stress on your joints,” adds Dr. Prest.Most recently, a 2021 review published in the journal Nutrients in 2021 reported a correlation between high vitamin C intake and lower serum uric acid levels.Where the misconception stems from is unclear, but what we do know is that people with gout do not need to avoid all dairy foods, as they are low in purines, according to Dr.

Prest.For example, a 2011 study published in the journal Current Rheumatology Reports found that, “low-fat dairy intake has a moderate urate-lowering effect.”.A 2018 review published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition Researchers analyzed 19 studies that evaluated dietary factors and risk of gout.The researchers found drinking alcohol to be positively correlated to high uric acid levels.No matter how much tart cherry juice the study participants with gout consumed, uric acid levels remained unchanged.In fact, drinking cherry juice sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup may contribute to or worsen a gout flare. .

Tart Cherry Juice Doesn't Help Prevent Gout Flares, a New Study

Tart Cherry Juice Doesn't Help Prevent Gout Flares, a New Study

Tart Cherry Juice Doesn't Help Prevent Gout Flares, a New Study

“If there is an effect of cherry concentrate on gout flares over a longer time period, it is not likely to be mediated by reduction in [serum urate].”.Join CreakyJoints’ patient-centered research registry to track your symptoms, disease activity, and medications — and share with your doctor. .

Effects of Tart Cherry Powder on Serum Uric Acid in Hyperuricemia

Effects of Tart Cherry Powder on Serum Uric Acid in Hyperuricemia

Effects of Tart Cherry Powder on Serum Uric Acid in Hyperuricemia

Hyperuricemia, as a critical risk factor for various adverse clinical outcomes, shows a trend of increasing prevalence among young-aged population.The results indicated that low dose of tart cherry powder (0.17 g/kg·bw) showed effects on hyperuricemia by slightly decreasing serum uric acid and improving kidney injury, whereas high dose of tart cherry powder (0.50 g/kg·bw) could merely alleviate kidney injury.The overproduction of uric acid along with renal disorders results in the supersaturation of monosodium urate crystals [5] that deposit in joints and increase inflammation and causes gout [6].The prevalence of hyperuricemia dramatically increased and was higher in men than in women during the past decades.However, impaired renal function may cause the retention of kidney-excreted medicines and their metabolites, which consequently prolongs their plasma half-lives and increases the risk of serious adverse events, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis induced by allopurinol [15].Besides, a survey showed that patients had a high degree of interest in nonpharmacological therapies for gout [16].The above proofs suggest that other additional strategies such as dietary intervention with efficacious function foods may be promising in alleviating hyperuricemia in the long run.Recently, nutritional studies have focused more on the use of function foods to improve human health.Tart cherry (Prunus cerasus, sour cherry) is increasingly popular with several reported beneficial effects including lowering blood pressure, modulating blood glucose, enhancing cognitive function, protecting against oxidative stress [3], reducing inflammation, and alleviating muscle damage commonly associated with prolonged physical effort [17].Two epidemiological studies suggested that tart cherry could decrease serum uric acid in healthy population [18] or overweight/obese adults [15].An animal study of 2 weeks showed that tart cherry juice treatment reduced the serum uric acid levels in hyperuricemic rats in a time-dependent manner [19].A system review revealed an association between cherry intake and a reduced risk of gout attacks [20].Therefore, it is of interest to investigate the potential of tart cherry to improve hyperuricemia in a relatively long term.Nevertheless, whether to treat asymptomatic hyperuricemia or not is still lacking in universal agreement, and early treatment is hardly realized as a practice of preventing concept at present [21].This study aims to explore the long-term effects of tart cherry powder on the progressive hyperuricemia and the secondary renal and liver injury comparing with classical medicine effects in hyperuricemic rats caused by oteracil potassium and adenine.Tart cherry powder was provided by By-Health Co., Ltd (Zhuhai, Guangdong, China) and extracted from Prunus cerasus by BerryShieldTM technology with the proportion of 13 : 1, and total polyphenol was up to 7.4% ± 3.0 .SPF-grade male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats (body weight range: 200∼250 g) were purchased from Dashuo Laboratory Animal Reproduction Center (Chengdu, Sichuan, China) (Certificate No.The liver tissue in the middle of the hepatic lobe and left kidney were fixed in 10% buffered formalin, embedded in paraffin and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and observed under a photo microscope (Olympus DP73, Japan).Liver and kidney histological injury evaluation depended on two previous semiquantitative scoring systems.Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 21.0 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA).Quantitative data satisfied with normal distribution exhibited arithmetical mean with standard deviation (x ± SD), and others were expressed by median with percentiles (M ± interquartile range).These data, unsatisfied with normal distribution, were considered to take variable transformation to meet above prerequisite.As illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, none exhibited abnormal general behaviors and difference of organ coefficients due to any intervention during the experiment.No difference of AST and ALT in peripheral blood was noted among all groups after treating 45 days (Table 2).As illustrated in Figure 3 and Table 5, at the beginning of the study, serum uric acid evenly distributed in the range of ± 1.96 S. The serum uric acid increased steadily in the model group during days 1–45 and as high as four times of serum uric acid in the vehicle control group ( ), which demonstrated the successful establishment of hyperuricemia rat model over one month.This result implied low-dose tart cherry powder has limited improving effect on serum uric acid.Activity of XOD and ADA in peripheral blood reflected the serum uric acid metabolism.The results reflected that allopurinol can reduce the increased activity of XOD and ADA caused by oteracil potassium and adenine.One limitation is that the pathogenesis of renal injury resulting from the intervention of modeling drugs (i.e., oteracil potassium and adenine) directly could not be decided.Our study demonstrates the tart cherry powder at low dose showed limited protecting effects on hyperuricemia by slightly decreasing serum uric acid at the early stage of hyperuricemia and improving kidney injury.A latest population study demonstrated that tart cherry concentrate dose was lacking in effect on serum urate in people with gout [26].Similar results with a significant 19.4% reduction in serum uric acid were observed in 26 overweight and obese participants who consumed 240 mL/d (8 oz/d) of tart cherry juice for 4 wk [15].Thus, the benefits of tart cherry decreasing serum uric acid might be limited, which indicated that tart cherry may benefit to reduce serum uric acid in early hyperuricemia but cannot replace medical therapy [3].As a result, all interventions made no difference in any groups, which mainly suggested allopurinol and tart cherry do not cause liver injury for the hyperuricemia rat model at the dose in the study.Even if the effects of tart cherry on hyperuricemia are limited, other benefits were observed in our results which are in accordance with other studies.Improvement of pathological injury of kidney was observed after being treated by tart cherry for consecutive 45 days.In the hyperuricemia model caused by adenine and oteracil potassium, renal injury referred to the following two aspects.On the one hand, hyperuricemia can induce excessive uric acid deposition in renal interstitium, and the uric acid crystal brings about ductal arteriole smooth muscle proliferation and lumen stenosis followed by glomerular and postbulbar circulatory ischemia; meanwhile, free uric acid is related to chronic interstitial nephritis and fibrosis secondary to local inflammation, the two pathways both cause renal injury exhibited as renal tubular dermal cell dysfunction, renal hemodynamic changes, and glomerular hypertrophy and pathologic change.These suggested that tart cherry powder is more likely to improve kidney injury by antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effects rather than simply reducing uric acid.Based on hyperuricemia rats model induced by oteracil potassium and adenine, this study demonstrated limited benefits of tart cherry on hyperuricemia, which reflected reduction of serum uric acid at low dose and alleviation of kidney injury, and the reduction of serum uric acid may be related to the ADA activity rather than XOD activity.

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