Lemon Curd Tart With Italian Meringue
Tart

Lemon Curd Tart With Italian Meringue

  • December 2, 2021

In a large bowl stir the flours and the sugar.Sprinkle some extra flour if it gets sticky while you are rolling it.This will help pre-cook our tarts.Add the butter and the lemon juice.Once we put them back into the oven, the lemon curd will tend to increase its volume and we don’t want it to get out of the tart.Start beating them slowly, speeding the machine up gradually.Put the meringue in a pastry bag with a star-pointed beak and pour it onto the tarts. .

Classic Mini Lemon Meringue Tarts – Homemade Eatery

Classic Mini Lemon Meringue Tarts – Homemade Eatery

Classic Mini Lemon Meringue Tarts – Homemade Eatery

Each lemon tart is then topped with a sweet and delicately torched Italian meringue.Slight shrinking isn’t much of an issue for me as I don’t find it affects the final outcome.The easiest way to avoid this is to poke holes in the base using a fork and then weigh the pastry cases down using baking beans.I didn’t have any pastry beans but I did put a bit of pressure on the base once they had finished baking.The original recipe suggests adding double cream but I find that the butter adds enough richness to the lemon curd.Italian meringue can be a bit of a learning curve if you haven’t baked with hot sugar before but it’s definitely worth making.I’m all for sharing recipes that require minimal equipment so that the average home baker doesn’t have a thousand limits that prevent them from baking.Keep in mind that making the pastry or meringue before assembling will reduce the length of time that the lemon tarts can be stored in the refrigerator. .

Lemon Meringue Tart (with Italian Meringue)

Lemon Meringue Tart (with Italian Meringue)

Lemon Meringue Tart (with Italian Meringue)

If you’ve been following the baking calendars, you already know how to make lemon curd and pâte sucrée.Then you slowly pour the syrup into the partially whipped egg whites while the stand mixer does its job.You could seal the tart crust before adding the lemon curd, to reduce sogginess.To do so, you could brush the tart crust with egg wash 5 minutes before the end of the baking time (and return to the oven).You could seal the tart crust before adding the lemon curd, to reduce sogginess.To do so, you could brush the tart crust with egg wash 5 minutes before the end of the baking time (and return to the oven).Italian meringue is made by adding a hot, cooked syrup (sugar and water) to partially whipped egg whites.To make the syrup, a small amount of water is added to prevent the sugar from caramelizing.While you are cooking the syrup, you can use a wet pastry brush to get rid of any sugar crystals on the sides of the pot.The reasoning behind this is that you don’t want to end up whipping the egg whites for too long while waiting for the syrup to cook.The hot syrup is then slowly added to the egg whites and the meringue is whipped until it has cooled down completely (about 32°C/90°F).The egg whites are cooked with the sugar in a double boiler until they reach a safe temperature.Another option would be to make small French meringue cookies and use them to decorate the top of your tart and add a nice crunch.If you recall from the post How to line a tart pan with pastry, we talked about the importance of rolling out only as much dough as you need.If the dough has softened, refrigerate it for 15 minutes before attempting to line the tart pan.If using a fluted tart pan, cut off the excess dough using a rolling pin.Let the tart crust cool completely on a wire rack before filling with lemon curd.It can, however, be quite tricky to whip a small amount of egg whites (two in this recipe) in a stand mixer.Depending on your stand mixer model, you can find videos on how to adjust the beater to bowl clearance.Wipe your mixing bowl, whisk and paddle attachment with vinegar to get rid of any fat residues (which would prevent the egg whites from whipping properly).Lower the speed of the stand mixer and start pouring the syrup slowly between the edge of the bowl and the whisk.Increase the speed to medium-high and keep whipping until the meringue has cooled down completely and forms stiff peaks.And if you are unhappy with the piped shape, you can easily scoop it up without ruining the lemon tart.In case you missed it, head over to the meringues baking calendar to see what we’ll be learning this month.Pin Print Lemon Meringue Tart (with Italian Meringue) Course: Dessert Cuisine: French Difficulty: Easy Servings 8 servings Prep time 35 minutes Cooking time 35 minutes Sweet and rich tart crust filled with a tangy lemon curd and topped with a silky smooth Italian meringue.Place the pâte sucrée between two sheets of parchment paper and roll out the dough to a thickness of about 3mm.Let the tart crust cool completely (in the mold) on a wire rack before filling with lemon curd.Return to the heat, on medium low, and keep whisking until it thickens and coats the back of a spatula.If your lemon curd looks lumpy, you can strain it into a bowl through a fine mesh sieve.Fill the (baked and cooled) tart shell with lemon curd and refrigerate while you prepare the Italian meringue.Prepare everything before you start making the syrup: Fit a piping bag with the desired tip (you can just use a spoon if you prefer).Wipe your mixing bowl, whisk and paddle attachment with vinegar to get rid of any fat residues (which would prevent the egg whites from whipping properly).While you are cooking the syrup, you can use a wet pastry brush to get rid of any sugar crystals on the sides of the pot.Lower the speed of the stand mixer and start pouring the syrup slowly between the edge of the bowl and the whisk.Once you have added all the syrup, increase the speed to medium-high and keep whipping until the meringue has cooled down (to about 32°C/90°F) and forms stiff peaks.There are two things you can do to fix this: a) adjust the beater to bowl clearance (see post for more details) b) Start with the paddle attachment and mix on high speed.It can be quite tricky to whip a small amount of egg whites (two in this recipe) in a stand mixer using the whisk attachment.There are two things you can do to fix this: a) adjust the beater to bowl clearance (see post for more details) b) Start with the paddle attachment and mix on high speed.You could seal the tart crust before adding the lemon curd, to reduce sogginess.To do so, you could brush the tart crust with egg wash 5 minutes before the end of the baking time (and return to the oven).To do so, you could brush the tart crust with egg wash 5 minutes before the end of the baking time (and return to the oven).If you didn’t prepare the dough by hand and used a mixer, it might be better to bake the tart using weights, to prevent air bubbles from forming.Wrap tightly in parchment paper and place in a zip-lock bag with the name of the dough and date written.Wrap tightly in parchment paper and place in a zip-lock bag with the name of the dough and date written.The egg whites are cooked with the sugar in a double boiler until they reach a safe temperature (checked with a digital thermometer).Another option would be to make small French meringue cookies and use them to decorate the top of your tart and add a nice crunch.When making Italian meringue, the hot syrup cooks the egg whites and technically brings them to a safe temperature of 71°C (160°F).The egg whites are cooked with the sugar in a double boiler until they reach a safe temperature (checked with a digital thermometer).Another option would be to make small French meringue cookies and use them to decorate the top of your tart and add a nice crunch.When making Italian meringue, the hot syrup cooks the egg whites and technically brings them to a safe temperature of 71°C (160°F). .

Lemon Tart With Italian Meringue

Lemon Tart With Italian Meringue

Lemon Tart With Italian Meringue

It’s been so long since I’ve written a blog post, I have to admit the prospect of sitting down and writing some words has become quite daunting.In the last few months, I’ve barely done any baking, this recipe was created and photographed way back in March.I know that sounds quite ominous, but I can assure you that all is fine, it’s very good actually and maybe that’s why I haven’t needed to lean on this space so much to write and create.That was back in February and since then, things have lost steam, when I first started blogging it was just me shouting out into the ether with a few people reading the odd post – most of whom I knew personally.Whilst I’m really glad my readership has expanded, I began to lose my way and became overwhelmed by all of the supporting social media necessary to share my content with the world.Instead teams of people work behind the scenes, virtual assistants are used to help with promotion, scheduling tools are used to help with posting to social media.I have no problem with any of this and I understand that the big websites/blogs or those choosing to make a living from blogging need to do these things to keep their content fresh and searchable.This isn’t suddenly going to turn into a healthy patisserie blog, don’t worry, but I wanted to be honest with you all as to why there’s been a gap and what I have been up to.Place the flour and butter in the food processor and gently mix until it resembles breadcrumbs.Add the egg yolk and the milk and mix until it starts to form a dough.Take the dough out of the machine and shape it into a block about 1cm thick, this will make it easier to roll out.Take a 25cm flan/pie dish and roll out the pastry between two sheets of greaseproof paper so that you don't add any extra flour.To make the lemon custard, crack the eggs into a large bowl and beat together using a fork, trying not to incorporate too much air while doing so.If when gently shaken you feel it is still rippling towards the outer part of the tart, bake for a further 10 minutes and then re-check.Gently pour the boiling syrup into the meringue and have the whites whisking on a slow speed while this is happening.After all the syrup has been added, increase the speed to maximum and whisk the egg whites until they are cool to the touch. .

Lemon Curd and Italian Meringue Tart Recipe

Lemon Curd and Italian Meringue Tart Recipe

Lemon Curd and Italian Meringue Tart Recipe

There’s nothing better than a soft, tarty lemon meringue filling encased in a firm, flaky, thick pie crust all under a toasted egg white topping. .

Lemon Meringue Tart

Lemon Meringue Tart

Lemon Meringue Tart

While many lemon curd recipes don’t call for corn starch, I recommend it for this tart as it helps it to set.Because this recipe calls for lemon zest, be sure to strain the finished curd through a fine mesh sieve before spreading in the tart shell.Straining will ensure a smooth finished product and will eliminate flecks of zest or little pieces of curdled, cooked egg.Course: Pie/Tart Cuisine: American Keyword: lemon curd, lemon meringue tart Servings : 8 servings Calories : 532 kcal Author : Cathy Roma | What Should I Make For… Ingredients Shortbread Crust 6 oz Lorna Doone shortbread cookies (or similar brand).12 Tbsp unsalted butter, COLD (cut into 12 pieces) Meringue Topping 3 egg whites.Remove from heat and pass the lemon curd through a fine mesh sieve and discard the solids.Whip the egg whites and cream of tarter on high speed until soft peaks form.Recipe Notes Special Equipment: 9 inch fluted tart pan with a removable bottom Cook the curd over medium heat (don’t let it boil) whisking CONSTANTLY.While many lemon curd recipes don’t call for corn starch, I recommend it for this tart as it helps it to set.Because this recipe calls for lemon zest, be sure to strain the finished curd through a fine mesh sieve before spreading in the tart shell.Straining will ensure a smooth finished product and will eliminate flecks of zest or little pieces of curdled, cooked egg.I had been dreaming of dessert all day after watching my mom roll out the dough, stir the warm lemon filling and whip the egg whites.Finally when the dinner dishes were cleared and stacked and coffee cups filled, it was dessert time.Sandwiched between plates of iced Italian cookies on the table stood the pie, just waiting to be sliced.But that memory isn’t just about the taste of the pie, I also remember feeling so happy and excited on those summer nights when family gathered.My dad was as happy as you’d ever see him, laughing easily at my uncle’s jokes with that glint in his green eyes reserved for nights like this.I see a lot of my dad in myself as I grow older…a stubborn streak, the desire to perfect a craft, the expression of love through food and hosting.We get almost giddy before the first bite of a hot fudge sundae or have the eagerness of a child when freshly baked cookies are pulled from the oven.I hope that his first bite transported him to that same place it brought me…warm nights filled with family and easy laughter. .

How to make lemon meringue pie recipe

How to make lemon meringue pie recipe

How to make lemon meringue pie recipe

Bake for 15–20 minutes.Pour it into the pastry case and set aside to cool completely.The mixture should be smooth, thickened and set.To make the meringue, put the sugar and 75ml/2½fl oz water into a saucepan and gently bring to the boil, stirring until the sugar is dissolved.Whisk until the meringue is cool – it should be shiny and stiff.Remove the cooled tart from the tin. .

Mini Lemon Tarts with Italian Meringue and Strawberries

Mini Lemon Tarts with Italian Meringue and Strawberries

Mini Lemon Tarts with Italian Meringue and Strawberries

What are Mini Lemon Tarts with Italian Meringue and Strawberries?| 5 Tips for Making the Best Mini Lemon Tarts | How to Caramelize Meringue | Essential Baking Tools for This Recipe.What are Mini Lemon Tarts with Italian Meringue and Strawberries?Mini lemon meringue tarts with strawberries consist of a pate sablee crust, lemon curd, Italian meringue, and thinly sliced strawberries.5 Tips for Making the Best Mini Lemon Meringue Tarts.First, for a tender and buttery crust, cream the room temperature butter with the sugar, add the egg, and then mix the dry ingredients in just until incorporated.Third, always use pie weights when making tart crusts.Otherwise, enjoy the silky smooth texture of my lemon curd because it’s amazing!The first option is to put the meringue covered tarts in the oven and bake them for 10 minutes at 350 until the meringue is golden.The second option is to use a small torch to create that beautiful caramelization.A whisk to make the lemon curd., room temperature 1/3 cup powdered sugar.Tbs cornstarch (optional for a stiffer curd) A handful of fresh strawberries For the Italian Meringue 100 grams or 3 large egg whites , room temperature.Add the egg and mix.If the dough chills for more than an hour, let the dough sit out for 20-30 minutes so that it is easier to work with.Next, press the dough into the tart pans and remove the excess dough along the edges with the palm of your hand or with a knife.Bake mini tarts for 23-28 minutes.To Make the Lemon Curd See the directions here for the lemon curd.Turn the mixer onto speed 4 or 5 on a 10 speed mixer and let the mixer run while the sugar syrup is cooking.Turn the mixer on high for a minute or two if the whites aren’t at stiff peaks by the time the sugar syrup reaches temperature.Remove from mixer and set aside. .

Lemon-Lavender Meringue Tarts

Lemon-Lavender Meringue Tarts

Lemon-Lavender Meringue Tarts

The meringue shell is whipped until it is as light as air, spooned into little clouds and baked just until they are set, but still slightly soft in the middle.The tartness of the curd is always a perfect match for the sweet meringue, and a bit of lavender creates a gentle floral touch, without going overboard.The simplest is the French meringue, which is just egg whites with sugar sprinkled over them as you whip them to peaks.There are also pasteurized eggs whites on the market that eliminate any fear, but I find they don’t whip up quite as well.It helps to create a lofty, shiny French meringue by starting with room temperature egg whites.This process cooks the eggs enough to make them edible without having to bake them and gives the meringue great strength.It CAN be baked (its what I used for these tartlettes) or used to make buttercream, mousse or toasted meringue topping.A sugar syrup is heated to about 242°F on a candy thermometer and then very carefully poured over whipping egg whites.This creates a very stable meringue, which will hold up in a buttercream, toppings for pies and folded into mousses or Baked Alaska.1 tablespoon fresh or dried lavender buds, plus more for sprinkling over the top of the tarts.Put the bowl over a double boiler and stir with a rubber spatula until the sugar is completely melted.Once it is completely smooth, put it on your stand mixer and beat with the whip attachment on medium high speed.In a bowl set over a double boiler, with an inch of simmering water below, whisk together the yolks, egg, sugar, lemon juice, zest and lavender. .

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