Portuguese Egg Tart Without Heavy Cream
Tart

Portuguese Egg Tart Without Heavy Cream

  • January 14, 2022

Portuguese Custard Tarts are a deliciously flaky dessert that migrated to Macau and became a local favorite.The first time I tried Portuguese Custard Tarts, or pasteis de nata, wasn’t in Portugal, but in Macau.Macau is a former Portuguese colony, handed back to China in 1999, and just an hour’s ferry ride away from Hong Kong.The first time I sampled these amazing custard tarts was at Lord Stow’s bakery at the Venetian Hotel in Macau.Recently, our family visited Macau looking for things to do (read: places to eat) and one of our stops was Margaret Café e Nata to try their version of Portuguese Custard Tarts.I have to say, there was a lot of experimentation involved in this recipe, but we’ve ironed out the details to help you get perfect results.So treat yourself, make these Portuguese Custard Tarts at home, and take a mini trip to Macau in your kitchen.Make and use your own homemade puff pastry for that signature buttery flavor of Portuguese custard tarts you find in Macau!Start with 6 pieces first, wrap the rest up, and put them back in the refrigerator or freezer to keep them chilled.This short video below shows the process of rolling the puff pastry disc of dough, pressing it into the tin and shaping the rim of the dough around the tin so the pastry will hold that delicious custard securely while baking.Place over medium-low heat, continuing to whisk until the mixture begins to coat the sides of the pan.When the custard is thick enough to coat a spoon, remove from the heat and continue to whisk, ensuring you scrape the sides of the pan.Set aside to cool completely, pressing plastic wrap onto the surface of the custard so a skin does not form on top.Place the frozen puff pastry shells on a sheet pan (you can line it with parchment paper for easy cleanup).When baking is complete, remove the custard tarts from the oven (leaving them in the tins), and place on a rack to cool.Once they are cool enough to handle, remove the custard tarts from the tins and enjoy them warm, perhaps with a mug of milk tea! .

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

If you've ever been to Portugal, you know that one of the greatest pastries to binge-eat there is the Portuguese egg tart: its crisp, flaky crust holding a creamy custard center, blistered on top from the high heat of an oven.If you don't want to buy molds (though Mendes highly recommends them), you can make these tarts in a muffin tin. .

Pastéis de Nata

Pastéis de Nata

Pastéis de Nata

There are all kinds of reasons why the original pastéis de nata from this pastry shop are so freaking good.Secret recipes, teams of folks who do nothing but make the pastry dough or whip up the filling, ovens that blast at 800°F.The secrets to making spectacular authentic Portuguese custard tarts at home are few and simple.The tremendously delightful and charming London pastry queen Cupcake Jemma uses my recipe to make her delicious Portuguese custard tarts.Video Video: How to Make Pastéis de Nata Pastéis de Nata ~ Portuguese Custard Tarts This pastéis de nata recipe makes as-close-to-authentic Portuguese custard tarts with a rich egg custard nestled in shatteringly crisp pastry.David Leite Prep 1 hr Cook 1 hr 30 mins Total 2 hrs 30 mins Dessert Portuguese 40 pastries 83 kcal 4.81 / 118 votes Print Recipe Equipment ▢ Mini-muffin tin with 2-by-5/8-inch (50-by-15-mm) wells; If you prefer the classic larger tins from Portugal, you can purchase them at Portugalia Marketplace.Ingredients US Metric For the pasteis de nata dough ▢ 2 cups minus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour plus more for the work surface.▢ 2 sticks (8 oz) unsalted butter room temperature, stirred until smooth For the custard ▢ 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour.Generously flour a work surface and pat the dough into a 6-inch (15-cm) square using a pastry scraper.Flour the dough, cover with plastic wrap, and let it rest at room temperature for 15 minutes.Make the custard In a medium bowl, whisk the flour and 1/4 cup milk (60 ml) until smooth.Bring the sugar, cinnamon, and water to a boil in a small saucepan and cook until an instant-read thermometer registers 220°F (104°C).Meanwhile, in another small saucepan, scald the remaining 1 cup milk (237 ml).Remove the cinnamon stick and then pour the sugar syrup in a thin stream into the hot milk-and-flour mixture, whisking briskly.Whisk in the yolks, strain the mixture into a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside.Place 1 piece pastry dough, cut side down, in each well of a nonstick 12-cup mini-muffin pan (2-by-5/8-inch [50-by-15-mm] size).These are the original pastéis de nata tins that all the great pastry shops in Portugal use. .

Portuguese tart recipe (Complete guide and tips for beginners)

Portuguese tart recipe (Complete guide and tips for beginners)

Portuguese tart recipe (Complete guide and tips for beginners)

I am presenting the version which is the widely available dessert on the menu of many Chinese cafes (茶餐厅), particularly in Hong Kong and Taiwan.Portugal has stamped its mark in Asia by conquering many regions, including where I live, i.e. Malaysia in 1511 and subsequently settled in Macau in the 16th century.Of course, with the over 400 years of cultural influence, you can’t miss savoring the Macau Portuguese egg tarts based on the authentic Portuguese pastel de nata if you ever visit Macau.The shortcut is to buy the ready-made puff pastry and skip all the rolling and folding.As for the shortening, it will congeal and coat the inside of the mouth to give an unpleasant taste.However, you can skip some of the paragraphs if you are a seasoned baker, or even can show me more tips to perfect the recipe by leaving your comment at the end of this article.Before you begin, take a look of the recipe (near to the end of this article) and then read through the list of tips I have written right below 🙂.When the pastry is heated up, the steam trap in the layers is expanded and responsible for its spectacular rising power.There is a slight difference between the western puff pastry and the Chinese puff pastry for making traditional Dim Sum like Chinese egg tarts and Siu Bao.Some pastry shops use lard instead of butter, perhaps that’s due to the Chinese consume fewer dairy products in general.The most frustrating part of making puff pastry is it can get messy, with flour scatter everywhere and butter oozing out from the dough while rolling.The following tips are useful to keep the mess to the minimum so you can enjoy preparing your lovely Portuguese tarts.If you ever break the layer of pastry at this point, do a quick ‘repair’ by adding a sufficient amount of flour to cover the leakage at once.Therefore it is very much easier as it is not as hard as butter when refrigerated, and not melt quickly at room temperature.If you happen to have a batch of egg tarts with collapse filling, chances are that the amount of cornflour is insufficient.Cook the milk mixture until it can lightly coat the surface of the metal spoon.Anything fall short than that may cause the custard unstable and potentially separate into two layers.This step is to remove any lumps that might form while heating the cornflour, sugar, and milk.The most challenging part of baking the Portuguese tart is to get the right temperatures to produce the partially charring surface and yet does not incinerate the pastry!If you cannot adjust the rack position, put the tray on an inverted cake pan so that the surface of the custard is closer to the upper heat source.The surface of the Portuguese tart will brown quickly before the pastry gets burnt and charred.The pastry and the custard will turn color quickly at this point due to the high heat. .

Matcha Portuguese-style Egg Tart » Betty L

Matcha Portuguese-style Egg Tart » Betty L

Matcha Portuguese-style Egg Tart » Betty L

All my not-so-carefully laid plans of travel posts (I owe this blog Scotland + Iceland..Not this matcha version – the delightful egg custard tart with specks of black on the shiny surface surrounded by a super flaky crust?The Portuguese egg tart is another Asian bakery treat I absolutely could not resist, and this extends to current adult-life, too.Portuguese egg tarts are indeed found in its namesake country, although I’d never had the treat myself, but apparently it is speckled with cinnamon and is encased in this beautiful puff pastry crust.Portuguese style egg tarts are something I’ve been itching to get my hands on for awhile, but I never had the courage to try the puff pastry, until Mandy of Lady and Pups concocted a genius, seemingly fool-proof way to create that laminated pastry.It’s crisp and shatters at the slightest touch, something that apparently is characteristic of the Portugal authentic version.I cheerfully combined my two favorite things to make this matcha Portuguese style egg tart.The key to this custard to get those dark splotches is the high heat and the content of the milk.You know the skin that forms in hot milk (something I used to love to pick off and eat) on the surface?One thing about matcha that you must pay attention to is making sure the powdered tea is fully incorporated, with no lumps remaining.I used to always sift my matcha into my batter, but this time I threw everything for the custard into my trusty new Vitamix Ascent 3500!It’s a new line of blenders with a beautiful clear top (truly revolutionary), touch screen, programmed settings, and a timer so you can let it run and go do other things!Spread the room temperature dough out with your fingers (it’s the easiest way, I promise you), and roll snugly to form all those nice layers.ceramics – looks like white / saucepan – Boston general store / utensil – simon Pearce.Pour into a saucepan and heat over medium-low, until custard becomes thick, coating the back of a wooden spoon.Make sure your butter is completely softened to room temperature, so that it is spreadable, before you begin.Combine all purpose flour, the 1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter, salt, sugar, and water, and mix with a wooden spoon until dough forms.Bake for 20-25 minutes, until pastry edges are golden brown, turning if necessary to ensure even cooking. .

Portuguese Egg Tarts (The Best Recipe!)

Portuguese Egg Tarts (The Best Recipe!)

Portuguese Egg Tarts (The Best Recipe!)

Everyone loves egg tarts, to the point that there are over 10 variations of this one dish.From Portuguese, to Chinese, to Brazilian, and British – these tarts are a wonderful delicacy all over the world.The most popular egg tarts that everyone knows and loves are the Portuguese and the Chinese ones.For the shell, I “cheated” with a pack of off-the-shelf Betty Crocker Pie Crust Mix.You can also use Pillsbury frozen and rolled pie crust.If you don’t like your tarts too sweet, you can reduce the sugar a little bit.For a wholesome meal and easy weeknight dinner, I recommend the following recipes. .

Pastel de Nata or Portuguese Egg Tart

Pastel de Nata or Portuguese Egg Tart

Pastel de Nata or Portuguese Egg Tart

They are so amazingly good, just like how I remembered them...light and smooth egg custard with crisp flaky puff pastry.It was quite an adventure and so much fun and it was also at this time that I mastered using chopsticks out of necessity (and hunger) because it was the only utensils they would give us in Macau back then.Pastel (Pastéis for plural) de Nata, also known as Portuguese Egg Tart is one of the famous local specialties in Macau that should never be missed.Macau has been a Portuguese colony until late 1999 so that explains how this delicious pastry found its way to this tiny island in Asia all the way from Portugal.I cannot get it out of my mind for months after getting back to the Philippines so I tried recreating it using a different recipe (from the internet) but every single attempt ended up as a failure.Not only was it difficult to make puff pastry in a really warm and humid kitchen but I also cannot get the custard to be as smooth or the top as shiny with those burnt spots which is a signature of Pastel de Nata (aside from the time I burned a batch of course).They also tasted good too but not quite the Portuguese egg tarts that I know...then finally I found this recipe from Kitchen Tigress and she explained so well why I, and Rasa Malaysia in this case, were failing at making Pastel de Nata.Then I placed the center of the pastry dough at the middle of the butter-greased form and pressed it to the sides making it thinner and expanding it to reach the top.After forming the puff pastry shells, you have to freeze it for a few minutes again so they become firmer and will keep their shapes while baking as they tend to shrink in the heat.In a small pot or saucepan, whisk together the cream, sugar, egg yolks, cornstarch and milk until well combined and all lumps age gone.Cook egg mixture over medium-low heat while stirring continuously until it reaches the correct consistency, think crepe batter.Lower the temperature to 200°C and bake for another 15-20 minutes or until the top of the custard gets the burnt spots and the bubbling starts to subside.In a bowl, whisk together the cream, sugar, egg yolks, cornstarch and milk until well combined and all lumps age gone.Using a double boiler, cook the egg mixture over medium-low heat while stirring continuously until it reaches the correct thickness, like that of a crepe batter.Lower the temperature to 200°C and bake for another 15-20 minutes or until the top of the custard gets the burnt spots and the bubbling starts to subside. .

Pastel de Nata (Portuguese Egg Tart)

Pastel de Nata (Portuguese Egg Tart)

Pastel de Nata (Portuguese Egg Tart)

Pastel de nata (or Portuguese egg tart) is a 19th century small tart with a crispy puff pastry crust and a custardy pastry cream filling, presenting caramelized spots on top.This is the shortcut or easy dessert recipe that cuts the prep time quite a bit yet it tastes like the traditional treat.The original Portuguese egg tart recipe from the 19th century is a real secret.To make the labor less intensive, we used a store-bought pastry dough which cuts the prep time quite a bit.Then we used a custard recipe that doesn’t need to cook on the stovetop like a regular pastry cream.The pastry crust is crispy and the custard is creamy and presents caramelized spots that are very characteristic of the original pastel de belém.I first featured a different version at Manu’s Menu as part of a guest post a few years ago.Although created before the 19th century (1800’s) by Catholic monks in Lisbon, Portugal, these pasteis de nata quickly became quite popular in several Portuguese-speaking countries such as Brazil, Goa, and Macau, under the name of Portuguese Egg Tarts or Pastel de Ovo.Moreover, they became a hit in mainland China and countries with significant Portuguese immigration such as Canada, Australia, Luxembourg, the United States, England (where is called maids of honour), and France, among others.Portuguese enjoy sprinkling the top with ground cinnamon and powdered sugar, and often accompany the tarts with a bica (a strong espresso coffee).I grew up enjoying them all year round, sometimes by themselves and sometimes accompanied by a cup of café au lait.No matter where you go in Brazil, you will find the Portuguese pastel de nata in almost every café, bakery, or pastry shop – thank goodness!And The Guardian, the well-known British national newspaper, pronounced them as the 15th tastiest delicacy in the world.Puff pastry – we bought ours ready at the freezer of our local grocery store but you’re welcome to make yours from scratch.we bought ours ready at the freezer of our local grocery store but you’re welcome to make yours from scratch.Dairy – we used a combination of whole milk and heavy whipping cream to give the egg tarts that creamy consistency.we used a combination of whole milk and heavy whipping cream to give the egg tarts that creamy consistency.Then, add sugar, milk, heavy cream, and vanilla extract, whisking the mixture until homogeneous.1 Cover the bowl with a cling film or plastic wrap and chill in the fridge for at least one hour or until the sugar has dissolved.Prick the bottom and sides with a fork to prevent puff up too much and spill the filling.3 Bake at the middle rack for 15-25 minutes or until the dough is cooked through and golden brown and the custard is set and has burnt (caramelized) spots on top.Puff pastry: Make your own at home at least one day ahead or buy one ready as I did.Prick the bottom and sides with a fork so the dough won’t puff up too much and spill the filling.Some add flour or cornstarch as a thickener agent, cinnamon stick to flavor, and then cook the filling on the stovetop.Serve the pastel de nata sprinkled on top with ground cinnamon and powdered sugar if you want.Do not fill the crust more than 70% full with the creamy custard; otherwise, the risk of spillage is higher.The major difference is Portuguese egg tart has a burnt top because it is baked at high temperature (around 480° to 550° F or 250° to 290° C).On the other hand, the Chinese egg tart (Dim Sum) looks more like a regular custard tart with a (bright yellow filling) because it is baked at medium temperature (usually at 350° F or 180° C) and its filling calls for whole eggs and evaporated milk and usually is not cooked before baking.Both pastéis de nata recipe have a puff pastry flaky crust and call for a creamy filling.In Portugal, they serve these egg custard tarts sprinkled with powdered sugar and ground cinnamon on top plus a cup of espresso (bica).In Brazil, we eat them by themselves as a dessert or an afternoon sweet treat with a small cup of coffee (cafezinho).FOLLOW US on INSTAGRAM, PINTEREST, and FACEBOOK for more easy and delish recipes and updates.This is the shortcut or easy dessert recipe that cuts the prep time quite a bit yet it tastes like the traditional treat.Then, add sugar, milk, heavy cream, and vanilla extract, whisking the mixture until homogeneous.Cover the bowl with a cling film or plastic wrap and chill in the fridge for at least one hour or until the sugar has dissolved.Prick the bottom and sides with a fork to prevent puff up too much and spill the filling. .

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