Where Are Egg Tarts From
Tart

Where Are Egg Tarts From

  • October 21, 2021

This article is about the 20th century variations of egg tarts in Chinese cuisine.For the Portuguese 19th century egg tart, see Pastel de Nata.The egg tart (traditional Chinese: 蛋撻; simplified Chinese: 蛋挞; pinyin: dàntǎ (in Mandarin); Jyutping: daan6 taat1; Cantonese Yale: daahn tāat) is a kind of custard tart found in Cantonese cuisine derived from the English custard tart and Portuguese pastel de nata.[2] As Macau was a Portuguese colony, Macau-style egg tarts are a variation of the pastel de nata but they have been influenced by Guangzhou-style egg tarts.Hong Kong [ edit ].Egg tarts were introduced to Hong Kong via Guangzhou in the 1940s but initially could only be found in higher-end Western-style restaurants. .

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

However, both the English and Portuguese versions ultimately come from the king of pastries, France, while the egg tarts you'll find in Chinese restaurants and bakeries today are distinct from their European cousins.Legend says the monks had been based in France, where they learned of delectable pastries, and that they needed a way to use up the yolks separated from the egg whites that were used to starch clothing.Sensing impending closure after the the Liberal Revolution of 1820, the enterprising monks of the Jerónimos Monastery started selling pastéis de nata to a nearby sugar refinery.Portugal, with its long history of naval exploration, first landed in Guangzhou Province in 1513 while Hong Kong became a British colony in the early 1840s.After World War II, eating establishments called cha chaan tengs, literally “tea restaurants,” started popping up in Hong Kong.Casual and inexpensive, they specialized in Western-style dishes with a Chinese twist, including milk tea, "French" toast, and egg tarts.A Portuguese colony from 1557 to 1999, Macau has probably seen its fair share of pastéis de nata, but a uniquely Macanese egg tart seems to have arisen more recently.While Stow originally developed the tart for the homesick Portuguese community, they were an instant hit with the local Chinese as well, and continue to be. .

Hong Kong Egg Tarts (Chinese Dim Sum/Pastry)

Hong Kong Egg Tarts (Chinese Dim Sum/Pastry)

Hong Kong Egg Tarts (Chinese Dim Sum/Pastry)

What Are Hong Kong Egg Tarts?Hong Kong egg tarts are small (usually about 3 inches in diameter) circular tarts of flaky pastry, filled with a smooth, lightly sweetened egg custard.The Hong Kong and Macau versions of egg tarts are pretty different.The Hong Kong version was influenced by British custard tarts, which are more glassy and smooth, with a more delicately laminated flaky pastry.This is all to say that for the most accurate results, use a digital kitchen scale to follow the weight measurements in this recipe (Use the toggle below the ingredients in the recipe card to switch to “Metric.”) Ok, on to the recipe!Hong Kong Egg Tarts: Recipe Instructions.Cut the butter into 1/2 inch cubes, and add to the flour/salt mixture.While the dough is resting, make the filling.Dissolve the sugar into 1 cup of hot water, and allow the mixture to cool to room temperature.While this measuring cup in the photo below wasn’t big enough to hold all the custard, you should have about 2 to 2 1/4 cups total.If you don’t have a fluted cutter, you can use the tip of a chopstick or fork to make a crimped edge around the rim of the dough.Press the dough circles into either mini tart tins, leaving a lip going over the top of the tin.Evenly fill the tart shells about three quarters full.If you have an ample lip of dough at the top, you can fill it just until you reach the part where the dough curves outward.For the best results and mind blowing texture and taste, eat these Hong Kong egg tarts while they are still warm!We like them with a cup of Hong Kong milk tea.Here’s the full printable Hong Kong Egg Tarts Recipe!For more treats, also check out our collection of Dim Sum recipes and Chinese Bakery recipes. .

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Portuguese Egg Tart Recipe

Using a floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a ½-inch-thick rectangle, 10 inches long.Remove the plastic wrap and roll the dough into a 15-inch square, dusting with more flour as needed.Spread half of the remaining butter on the bottom half of the dough, leaving a 1-inch rim.Spread the remaining butter all over the dough, leaving a 1-inch rim.In a medium saucepan, combine the sugar, water and cinnamon stick over high heat.Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, heat 1 cup, plus 1 tablespoon, of the milk over medium heat until bubbles begin to form around the edges, 4 to 5 minutes.In a large bowl, whisk the flour with the remaining 5 tablespoons of milk.Pour 1½ tablespoons of the warm filling into each pastry shells.Then, remove the molds, transfer the tarts to the wire racks and sprinkle with cinnamon. .

A visual history: the evolution of the egg tart

A visual history: the evolution of the egg tart

A visual history: the evolution of the egg tart

The egg custard nestled into a baked pastry shell is a dim sum staple throughout Hong Kong and the Guangdong province of China.Chinese-style egg tarts.In 1989, a British baker in Macau by the name of Andrew Stow wanted to add Portugal’s pasteis de nata to his repertoire but didn’t have the recipe.“Being too proud to ask a local Portuguese for the recipe, he concocted his own version,” says Eileen Stow, his sister and current owner of his business, Lord Stow’s Bakery.The food world went insane at this new eggy permutation, queues kept on forming, and years later, copycat versions now exist all across Asia from Hong Kong to Singapore. .

How to make Chinese Egg Tarts- recipe, video and complete guide

How to make Chinese Egg Tarts- recipe, video and complete guide

How to make Chinese Egg Tarts- recipe, video and complete guide

You must be familiar with the Hong Kong egg tarts if you like Cantonese dim sum.Whilst the barbecue meat bun is the signature of the savory dim sum, the most lovable dessert will be none other than the Hong Kong egg tart.Since Macau is just a short boat ride from Hong Kong, the locals had modified the original Portuguese egg tarts and served them along with other Cantonese dim sums for breakfast.Macau’s version resembles the Portuguese tarts with a scorched caramelized exterior.Traditional pastry chefs used lard to make this pastry, but recently many bakeries and dim sum makers have changed from lard to butter, which is healthier and has a universal flavor.“The flavor of the Chinese puff pastry (酥皮) is different from the western version.The flavor of Hong Kong egg tarts fresh from the oven is simply amazing.Many people wish to make it at home but finally, give up because of the tedious process and the skills required.However, the essence of the egg tarts lies on the unreplaceable texture and flavor of the Chinese puff pastry.You need to use the Chinese puff pastry for this recipe to make the REAL and AUTHENTIC Hong Kong style egg tarts comparable to the best dim sum store in Hong Kong and Southern China.Making puff pastry is tedious, but it is highly rewarding when you enjoy the fruits of your labor.Now is your turn to bake and enjoy eating this famous Hong Kong dim sum as much as I do.The upper side of the pastry will be evenly trimmed and the perforated layer will be clearly visible after baking.It helps to keep the butter from melting and the rapid rise in temperature in the oven creates distinct layers of the pastry.The upper side of the pastry will be evenly trimmed and the perforated layer will be clearly visible after baking.It helps to keep the butter from melting and the rapid rise in temperature in the oven creates distinct layers of the pastry.The egg will be partially cooked by the hot syrup and forms small lumps which are unsightly.The egg will be partially cooked by the hot syrup and forms small lumps which are unsightly.The initial high temperature will cause the pastry to rise up rapidly, and form a multi-layer structure, whilst the lower heat will finish the cooking subsequently.Leave the oven door ajar for five minutes then remove the egg tarts to let them cool down slowly.will cause the pastry to rise up rapidly, and form a multi-layer structure, whilst the lower heat will finish the cooking subsequently.Leave the oven door ajar for five minutes then remove the egg tarts to let them cool down slowly.Once the egg tarts cool down, the sugar syrup will form a shiny layer on the surface of the custard.Many people encounter the tearing of the water dough, which causes the oil layer in the middle oozing out to the surface.While you patch up the leaking dough with flour frantically, the butter is getting softer too.So more flour is required, and eventually, the dough will turn into a lump of sticky mass.Place a large piece of cling film on the surface of the chiller top or a stainless steel table.It is not worth to spend the time to remove (and potentially messy) any small amount from there, as there will be no significant impact on the final result.The most frustrating thing when making puff pastry is when the butter starts to melt and leak through the layers of the dough.The layers of the pastry will be poorly defined and the butter will stick to the rolling pins and the table.The best way is to place the pastry quickly in the freezer to let the butter harden before resuming the folding and rolling process.The most frustrating thing when making puff pastry is when the butter starts to melt and leak through the layers of the dough.The layers of the pastry will be poorly defined and the butter will stick to the rolling pins and the table.The best way is to place the pastry quickly in the freezer to let the butter harden before resuming the folding and rolling process.I usually cut a piece of pastry big enough to cover the entire inner surface of the mold with some extra for trimming.Since puff pastry will shrink after rolling, it is best to rest it for a few minutes then trim the excess.I usually cut a piece of pastry big enough to cover the entire inner surface of the mold with some extra for trimming.Since puff pastry will shrink after rolling, it is best to rest it for a few minutes then trim the excess.Traditional Hong Kong egg tarts are made with lard, but the trend has shifted towards butter.Traditional Hong Kong egg tarts are made with lard, but the trend has shifted towards butter.I conducted a thorough review of this post in May 2020, and have made certain amendments to the recipe and include some additional information as below :.This position will avoid the egg filling being heated too quickly, while the pastry is still underbaked.This position will avoid the egg filling being heated too quickly, while the pastry is still underbaked.The egg custard will collapse after cool if the filling puffed up too high in the oven.by ten degrees Celsius, and keep the oven door ajar for a few seconds to reduce the temperature.Keep the work tidy by using a metal spoon and silicone spatula to transfer the oil dough.Trim off the excess pastry by pressing the side of the tart mold with the dough cutter or any flat object.Prepare the pastry Spread a large piece of cling film on the tabletop, sprinkle with some plain flour.Flatten the water dough and place another piece of cling film on top.Wrap it in cling film and leave it in the chiller for twenty minutes or until it hardens.Use a cookie cutter or bowl to cut out pieces of round pastry that are slightly larger than the area of the mold.Leave the oven door ajar for five minutes then remove the egg tarts.Recommended Products As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.GoodCook Classic Wooden Rolling Pin Nutrition Information: Yield: 12 Serving Size: 1. .

Egg Tart History: Pastéis de Nata & The Story of Custard Tarts

Egg Tart History: Pastéis de Nata & The Story of Custard Tarts

Egg Tart History: Pastéis de Nata & The Story of Custard Tarts

Egg Tart History: In this article & podcast we explore the history of the Egg Custard tart, and it’s famous Portuguese counterpart, the Pastéis de Nata (Cream Pastry).Pastéis de Nata – Egg custard tarts – are they Portuguese in origin, or were they first invented elsewhere?The portuguese egg tart which features a sweet egg custard in a puff pastry shell.Also in this episode we’ll be talking about how the Portuguese egg tart became so popular as well as looking at many other egg tarts from around the world.What is an Egg tart.It has to have a sweet, cooked custard made with egg in the middle, and it has to have a pastry shell.First, let’s talk about how the Portuguese egg tart – pasteis de nata – was first created….Egg Tart History (Pastéis de Belem) Lisbon.Along with growing availability of sugar from the new world, coming straight to Lisbon from the colonies, Egg custard tarts were the perfect way to use up those egg yolks.It’s unclear at this time if they sold them to the community, or just got fat eating them themselves.Others claim they sold the recipe to the sugar refinery, who in 1837 opened the Fábrica de Pastéis de Belém, the bakery still there today.So, Portuguese monasteries may have been making egg tarts since at least 1700.The Original Egg Tarts – Before Portugal.In England, they are called custard tarts.British egg tarts would typically feature shortcrust pastry, not puff pastry.When did England start making the small individual pastries?In Hong kong, the short pastry English style, and in Macau, the Portuguese puff pastry style.As Hong Kong was British and Macau used to be Portuguese, you’d assume that it was those nations that popularised the egg tarts their… But the story is not quite that simple.It appears the Hong Kong egg tart originated in the nearby mainland city of Guangzhou.As well as lard, another improvement was they served them warm, rather than the English way of cold.So when do you think Portuguese egg tarts first became popular in Macau?So, the Portuguese egg tart, a popular symbol of Macau today, was actually the british/chinese style until then.So, Macau, still a Portuguese colony in 1989, suddenly saw the arrival of the Pasteis de Nata, and from which country do you reckon the person who introduced them came from?In the 80’s he took a trip to Portugal and tasted the Pasteis de Nata for the first time.After returning to Macau, he opened Lord Stow’s Bakery in Coloane Village in 1989 with the intent of supplying baked goods, including the pasteis de nata, to supermarkets.What makes the best egg tart?So, finally on this episode – what makes the best egg tart or pasteis de nata?Mantegeria (Best sweet and warm pastéis de nata in Lisbon).Fabrica de Pastéis de Belem (Most Famous, original Lisbon egg tarts from 1830’s).Tai Cheong Bakery Hong Kong(Lardy Pastry) – Very good, though not the best in Hong Kong, which were purchased for us by a friend from a now unknown location 🙁.Lord Stow’s Bakery, Macau – Portuguese style in Macau, original 1989 shop. .

Everything You Need To Know About The Hong Kong Egg Tart

Everything You Need To Know About The Hong Kong Egg Tart

Everything You Need To Know About The Hong Kong Egg Tart

Everything You Need To Know About The Hong Kong Egg Tart.First popularized in the 40s and 50s, the history of this local snack reflects Hong Kong’s unique cultural identity as an East-meets-West melting pot.While the two pastries are similar, Macau’s egg tarts bear a caramelized top layer, unlike Hong Kong-style tarts, which are glossy and smooth on top. .

Hong Kong Egg Tart vs Macau Egg Tart

Hong Kong Egg Tart vs Macau Egg Tart

Hong Kong Egg Tart vs Macau Egg Tart

The Brits have been churning out custard tarts since medieval times and are said to have brought them to this corner of the world in the early 1900’s.Hong Kong has cheerfully adopted and adapted them, the result being the egg tarts we eat today.Tai Cheong bakeries are probably Hong Kong’s most famous egg tart bakers.They have been purveyors of egg tarts since the 1950’s and Chris Patten, the last Governor of Hong Kong was a regular customer back in the day.Originally he moved to Macau as a pharmacist, who in later years turned his skills to formulating a winning recipe.On a visit to Portugal, Andrew Stow was very taken with the traditional Pastel de Nata and returned to Macau determined to recreate these delicious tarts.Launched in 1989 he gave them away free to begin with and soon these egg tarts caught on like wildfire and have since become a quintessential symbol of Macau.It turns out that Lord Stow’s recipe is a closely guarded secret, so we can’t tell you exactly what goes into the Macanese egg tarts.Looking at other Portuguese egg tart recipes, we reckon the puff pastry probably includes butter, flour, water and salt.And, if you’re heading to Macau, why not book our guide Aubrey to show you around, he can certainly include a stop at Lord Stow’s bakery so that you can try the Macanese version.On the other hand Macau was once a Portuguese colony and to this day there are pockets of beautiful architecture such as the ruins of St Pauls. .

The Ultimate Guide to Lisbon's Iconic Egg Tarts

The Ultimate Guide to Lisbon's Iconic Egg Tarts

The Ultimate Guide to Lisbon's Iconic Egg Tarts

Now, locals eat pastéis de nata at breakfast, in the midmorning, after lunch, or in the evening — any time they’re craving a snack.The tart’s ingredients are very simple: a puff pastry filled with a custard made of cream, egg yolks, sugar, flour, and lemon zest.But that simplicity does not mean all egg tarts are created equal — the competition for the best pastel de nata in Lisbon is fierce, and some bakeries even keep their recipe secret.In Belém, Lisbon’s most touristy neighborhood, one of the longest lines is not for the 16th-century monastery Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, but for the dark blue pastelaria next door.During the day, international and Portuguese tourists queue for hours to buy boxes of egg tarts at the takeaway counter or nab a seat in one of the five massive dining rooms.Only six people alive today know that recipe, including the three master bakers who work behind closed doors at the so-called Secret Atelier.Open since 1829, the sixth-generation family pastry shop is fanciful and opulent, with decorative woodwork, a mirrored ceiling, and marble counters.The shop first gained renown in the 19th century, when the owner invited bakers and chefs from France and Spain to teach the art of pastry.The best move is to buy a dozen pastries: Fill half the box with egg tarts, and then add whatever other convent sweets catch your eye.The tiles from the interior and exterior remain, but the smoke has been replaced by the smell of sugar and an enticing window display of sweets.This is Alcôa’s second location; the original dates back to 1957 in Alcobaça, a city about two hours from Lisbon famous for its convent sweets.Warm egg tarts continuously come out of the oven, so no matter what time you stop in, there will always be a fresh batch.Located in the heart of Lisbon’s business area Saldanha, Versailles is a café with a charming Parisian vibe.With black-and-white checkerboard floors, chandeliers, and enormous mirrors, the 1920s-era interior is one of the most beautiful in Lisbon; it has also been a meeting place for many generations of politicians and locals alike.Owners Gabriela and José Carlos have been testing and perfecting their egg tart over the years, and they won’t reveal the secret to their success. .

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