Where Do Custard Tarts Originate From
Tart

Where Do Custard Tarts Originate From

  • July 5, 2022

Medieval recipes generally included a shortcrust and puff pastry case filled with a mixture of cream, milk, or broth, with eggs, sweeteners such as sugar or honey, and sometimes spices.Recipes existed as early as the fourteenth century that would still be recognisable as custard tarts today.Modern custard tarts are usually made from shortcrust pastry, eggs, sugar, milk or cream, and vanilla, sprinkled with nutmeg and then baked.A version by Marcus Wareing was selected on the BBC television programme Great British Menu as the final course of a banquet to celebrate Queen Elizabeth's 80th birthday.Variations on the classic recipe include the Manchester tart, where a layer of jam is spread on the pastry before the custard is added.[10] Versions topped with elaborate arrangements of fruit show the influence of French pâtisserie.The Indonesian version is called pai susu (milk custard pie) from Bali.Another type of Indonesian pie tart is pastel de nata (derived from Portuguese cuisine due to historical ties).Custard tarts in France, where they are known as flans pâtissiers, may be filled with fruit, making them similar to clafoutis. .

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

A Brief History Egg Tarts, From Portuguese Monks to Hong Kong

However, both the English and Portuguese versions ultimately come from the king of pastries, France, while the egg tarts you'll find in Chinese restaurants and bakeries today are distinct from their European cousins.Legend says the monks had been based in France, where they learned of delectable pastries, and that they needed a way to use up the yolks separated from the egg whites that were used to starch clothing.Sensing impending closure after the the Liberal Revolution of 1820, the enterprising monks of the Jerónimos Monastery started selling pastéis de nata to a nearby sugar refinery.Portugal, with its long history of naval exploration, first landed in Guangzhou Province in 1513 while Hong Kong became a British colony in the early 1840s.After World War II, eating establishments called cha chaan tengs, literally “tea restaurants,” started popping up in Hong Kong.Casual and inexpensive, they specialized in Western-style dishes with a Chinese twist, including milk tea, "French" toast, and egg tarts.A Portuguese colony from 1557 to 1999, Macau has probably seen its fair share of pastéis de nata, but a uniquely Macanese egg tart seems to have arisen more recently.While Stow originally developed the tart for the homesick Portuguese community, they were an instant hit with the local Chinese as well, and continue to be. .

Egg tart

Egg tart

Egg tart

Guangzhou's status as the only port accessible to European foreign traders led to the development of Cantonese cuisine having many outside influences.[1] As Guangzhou's economy grew from trade and interaction with European powers, pastry chefs at the Western-style department stores in the city were “pressured to come up with new and exciting items to attract customers”.One that appeared around 1927, produced in Guangzhou’s Zhen Guang Restaurant (真光酒樓), which is close to egg tarts Hongkongers know today.In the 1960s, cha chaan tengs began to serve egg tarts, popularizing the pastry with the working-class Hong Kong population.In June 2014, the technique of egg tart production was formally included in the Intangible Cultural Heritage Inventory of Hong Kong.[8][9] In 1999, Wong sold the recipe to KFC, which then introduced the Macau-style pastel de nata to other parts of Asia, including Singapore and Taiwan. .

Custard tart fight: can the British version ever compete with

I’m in Lisbon listening to some live fado, the Portuguese folk music that expresses the sorrows and yearnings of ordinary people.They are distinguished from other pastéis de nata by their slightly salty and extremely crisp puff pastry – partly from being baked at 400C – and the custard, made only with milk, not cream, which is less sweet.There are now many fine UK examples, but those at Portuguese Taste, a modest stall in Bristol’s St Nicholas’s Market, are declared superior to those in Belém by many expats.Yet, surprisingly, she achieves her excellent results using bought puff pastry, the only way to make production practical in her small market space.According to the EU’s inventory of national foods, they originated in East Anglia and versions were made as early as medieval times.Chef Marcus Wareing has gone some way to reviving the English classic, with a recipe for an egg-enriched pastry, similar to a French pâte sucrée.The result is a wonderfully smooth, creamy filling with a slightly burned top similar to the Portuguese varieties, and a good crisp case. .

Egg Tart History: Pastéis de Nata & The Story of Custard Tarts

Egg Tart History: Pastéis de Nata & The Story of Custard Tarts

Egg Tart History: Pastéis de Nata & The Story of Custard Tarts

Pastéis de Nata – Egg custard tarts – are they Portuguese in origin, or were they first invented elsewhere?Why the Portuguese egg tart is the culinary symbol of Macau, and the surprising story behind how it got there.Listen & Subscribe: iTunes | Spotify | Podbean | Google Play | Stitcher.It has to have a sweet, cooked custard made with egg in the middle, and it has to have a pastry shell.Before we get started, just a quick reminder, please subscribe to this podcast – that helps us let platforms know people are listening, which boosts our rankings.The exact invention date of the first pasteis de nata is unclear, though most sources believe it was being made from at least about 300 years ago.In the monasteries of Portugal at the time, egg white was used to starch clothes during the laundry process.Others are pretty clear that the epicentre of this was at Jeronimos monastery in Belem, close to Lisbon.At some point between 1820 and 1834 monks from Jeronimos monastery definitely began to sell the egg tarts in order to make money to endure.There was a sugar refinery just over the road from the monastery, and a small general store attached to it.Steamships used to bring daytrippers along the coast to marvel at the torre de Belem – the tower on the water there, and to see Jeronimos monastery, as the architecture is fantastic.Today, they make over 20,000 pastéis de nata daily and tourists and locals flock their for a sugary hit.Written documentation for something akin to a modern custard tart exists from 1399 where they were prepared for Henry IV coronation banquet.So, once again as in so many episodes of The Dish, simply the fact that England had an insatiable need to write things down, it seems like they are going to win the race for original egg custard tart.Also, british ones are cooked slowly, letting the custard go firm without caramelizing on top.Egg tarts are massively popular in both Hong Kong and Macau, both Chinese territories.As Hong Kong was British and Macau used to be Portuguese, you’d assume that it was those nations that popularised the egg tarts their… But the story is not quite that simple.The number one trick to make a tastebud punching egg tart is shortcrust pastry with lard!It appears the Hong Kong egg tart originated in the nearby mainland city of Guangzhou.The one vital ingredient for Portuguese style egg tarts is butter for the puff pastry.Because of this, its unclear if the choice of short crust pastry was due to British influence, or simply necessity.By the 1930’s, egg tarts had supposedly become a common dessert in Guangzhou – some sources claim a restaurateur there first adapted the recipe with lard in 1927 and it became a typical dim sum dish.By the 1940s and 50’s the adapted version had made its way to fancy cafes in Hong Kong and eventually became a budget snack for the people.So, Macau, still a Portuguese colony in 1989, suddenly saw the arrival of the Pasteis de Nata, and from which country do you reckon the person who introduced them came from?After returning to Macau, he opened Lord Stow’s Bakery in Coloane Village in 1989 with the intent of supplying baked goods, including the pasteis de nata, to supermarkets.But, because the local Chinese community was already used to egg tarts with dim sum, the Portuguese version became an instant hit!The name actually arose because, prior to getting into the bakery business, Andrew had tried to open a health food store – about 20 years before anyone in China would be interested in that sort of thing.The business struggled and so he took on a side job at night as the manager of the Green parrot disco at the Hyatt Regency.And it was such a popular name that copycat chains selling pasteis de nata started opening in Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan with the same name and even using Andrew’s photo illegally to promote their shops!So, Portuguese egg tarts, a culinary symbol of Macau, popularised by a British guy since only 1989.We took a food tour with the company withlocals.com in Lisbon, and our guide Lucian introduced us to the best portuguese style egg tart we’ve ever had…. .

The 4 Best Places To Try Custard Tarts in Lisbon – Devour Tours

The 4 Best Places To Try Custard Tarts in Lisbon – Devour Tours

The 4 Best Places To Try Custard Tarts in Lisbon – Devour Tours

Calling all adventurous foodies with a sweet tooth: if you haven’t tried the local custard tarts in Lisbon, book a trip right away.Cafés showcase long, glass counters filled with everything sweet from cookies and cakes to a variety of tarts.Pastéis de nata are custard tarts filled with sweet egg cream and covered in flaky pastry dough.The monks from the Mosteiro dos Jerónimos sold pastries in the sugar refinery next door to raise money.Creamy and sweet on the inside and perfectly flaky outside, this recipe is Portugal’s best-kept secret and only found at Pastéis de Belém.Locals advise tasting the custard tarts from Pastéis de Belém, but many admit that their favorite natas come from Manteigaria.Originally a butter shop (manteiga is the Portuguese word for butter), Manteigaria is a specialty store where you can order pastéis de nata to go (although some visitors like to order an espresso and watch the bakers make pastéis de nata through a glass pane).Confeitaria Nacional is an excellent place to try pastéis de nata and a photo-worthy landmark inside one of Lisbon’s grand Pombaline-style buildings.Many cafés and pastry shops are recognized for their delicious custard tarts, but the dreamy Pastelaria Versailles stands out for a few reasons.The stunning dining room pops with Art Nouveau style, showcasing large mirrors, chandeliers, and intricate wood paneling. .

Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts

Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts

Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts

A popular and modern twist on this recipe is to serve just the custard that is baked in small ramekins without any pastry.The mini tart pans/molds that I used are fluted, which give them a pretty presentation and measure 2 3/4” (7cm) wide by 3/4” (2cm) high.If you’ve made these Old Fashioned Egg Custard Tarts, please feel free to leave a comment below. .

Egg Custard Tarts

Egg Custard Tarts

Egg Custard Tarts

Inspired by The Great British Baking Show, I tried my hand at a classic Egg Custard Tart.Instructions For pastry, stir the flour and ground almonds together in a large bowl, then add the butter and rub in with your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.Crack in the egg and mix it with your fingers until the mixture forms a soft dough.Roll out the sweet pastry on a lightly floured work surface.Using an 11cm/4½in fluted cutter, cut out twelve discs and line the muffin tray moulds with the pastry circle.For custard filling, warm the milk in a pot until steaming, but not simmering at all, and beat the egg yolks and sugar together in a separate bowl until pale and creamy.Pour the milk onto the egg yolk mixture and whisk well, creating little bubbles.The base of the tarts should be perfectly baked through, without having over-cooked the custard filling.This is one of those baking recipes that really shows your attention to detail I think (mine sucks, frankly).The sweet pastry dough ended up being nice and soft after I mixed in the egg.Then you pour in warm whole milk and whisk until it forms a froth.I think the next time I would raise them up a tiny bit more as I basically just made them level with the tins.The thing I failed to do was rotate my muffin tin halfway through baking.Three of my tarts were slightly underbaked and stuck a bit to the muffin tin.The custard didn’t seem overcooked to me and the tart shell was nice and crispy all around. .

A visual history: the evolution of the egg tart

A visual history: the evolution of the egg tart

A visual history: the evolution of the egg tart

The egg custard nestled into a baked pastry shell is a dim sum staple throughout Hong Kong and the Guangdong province of China.Custard egg tarts have been a British confectionary since the medieval times and Portuguese pasteis de nata have been around since the 18th century, first made by Catholic monks in Belém, Portugal.In 1989, a British baker in Macau by the name of Andrew Stow wanted to add Portugal’s pasteis de nata to his repertoire but didn’t have the recipe.So he bastardized what he knew of the Portuguese pastry methods with his knowledge of British custard making and created what, with hindsight, he should have called a ‘Macau Egg Tart.’”.The food world went insane at this new eggy permutation, queues kept on forming, and years later, copycat versions now exist all across Asia from Hong Kong to Singapore. .

Individual Custard Tarts

Individual Custard Tarts

Individual Custard Tarts

The default gifts of socks and jocks isn't particularly exciting, yet it's what many Dad's receive on the day on which we are supposed to celebrate and acknowledge fathers for all that they do.Thankfully my Dad loves to read, so there were always plenty of books from his favourite authors, Bryce Courtney and Wilbur Smith, to choose from.So for Father's day I thought I'd share Dad's favourite treat - individual custard tarts.And it's one I've just discovered is a favorite of my husband too as he devoured one, still warm, just out of the oven, and admitted, between mouthfuls, he'd happily eat all 6! .

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