Where Does Cornflake Tart Come From
Tart

Where Does Cornflake Tart Come From

  • June 22, 2022

An old-school classic, cornflake tart is a terrifically tasty, super simple sweet treat that will leave the whole family wanting more.Back then, this crunchy classic was a very popular pudding on school lunch menus up and down the UK.Nowadays, much like coconut sponge squares and jam roly poly, cornflake tart is hard to find.Just imagine digging into a buttery, crumbly shortcrust pastry case, spread with rich raspberry jam and lashings of sweet and crunchy cornflakes, drizzled with luscious golden syrup!So, you’ve got a sweet tooth to satisfy and you want to know how to make cornflake tart?But if you need to save time, go for the ready made option and let this revolving wooden rolling pin do all the work for you.Bake a batch of mini cornflake tarts for an extra bit of joy.These colourful reusable silicone baking cups are as inviting as the cornflakes tart will be.Once baked, these mini cornflake tarts will make a perfect treat for school lunchbox.Either way, a spread of this secret ingredient across your cornflake tart will give it that wow factor!Cornflake tart is a classic British dish that is fondly remembered by anyone who grew up in the UK, especially in the 70s and 80s.The combination of the crunch, the luscious golden syrup, the layer of sticky strawberry jam spread across and the thin shortcrust pastry case at the bottom of the tin all added together proved too much for school kids up and down the country.It first became known for the use of the ‘cornflake cake’ recipe in ‘Nutrition and Child Welfare‘, a post-war food baking guide that was published in 1949.The humble cornflake, drizzled with golden syrup, was being used to rebuild the nation after the war effort.This is because it’s important the that the shortcrust pastry case holds together, so it needs to be baked until it has a slight golden colour, before the other tart ingredients are spread over the top.It has soared in popularity in recent years and is now a firm favourite for sweet toothed vegans all over the world.Agave has a colour that ranges from light to dark amber and is another very popular sweetener with vegans.But most types of honey bring a light, clean, pure taste, often with floral notes.But if you perfect your timing and get the custard just right (not too thick and not too thin) you’ll have a divine addition to just about any fruity dessert.But, if you want to save time, take the quick and easy (but still very tasty) option of custard powder.So, pour some lush creamy custard over your warm, fresh out of the oven cornflake tart.So, pour some lush creamy custard over your warm, fresh out of the oven cornflake tart.But there are plenty of other options in terms of breakfast cereals, each of which add their own spin to this cornflake tart recipe.Once your cornflake tart has come out of the oven, has cooled slightly and is ready to eat, you’ll most probably want to devour it all in one go (especially if your family are like mine)!There’s something about this dessert, with its golden syrup glaze and the spread of delicious filling hidden below that makes moderation impossible!But… if you find yourself with some slices of cornflake tart left over, you’ll want to know how to store it.For those of you who don’t eat your entire cornflake tart in one sitting, it should last for 3 days when you store it in an airtight container. .

Cornflake tart: a retro dish that conjures up British schooldays

Cornflake tart: a retro dish that conjures up British schooldays

Cornflake tart: a retro dish that conjures up British schooldays

When we talk to guests on The Spectator’s food and drink podcast, Table Talk, school dinners never fail to elicit strong opinions: from those who loved spam fritters, stodgy crumble and vats of custard, to others who shudder at the mere thought of a gloopy, tepid rice pudding.One dish that seems to have the fewest detractors is cornflake tart: a cheap and cheerful pudding, that required little more than store cupboard staples to make, and satisfied generations of children with its sky-high sugar levels.When we talk to guests on The Spectator’s food and drink podcast, Table Talk, school dinners never fail to elicit strong opinions: from those who loved spam fritters, stodgy crumble and vats of custard, to others who shudder at the mere thought of a gloopy, tepid rice pudding.One dish that seems to have the fewest detractors is cornflake tart: a cheap and cheerful pudding, that required little more than store cupboard staples to make, and satisfied generations of children with its sky-high sugar levels.Dishes can be a shorthand to memory, to shared experience — good and bad; smells and tastes bringing back things we thought we’d forgotten.Our memories can blunt the less attractive parts of dishes: I have fond memories of my granny’s gravy, even though I know that it had so much red wine in it that it made you wince, and I know objectively that the ‘pizzas’ my Mum would make on wholemeal pitta breads that we loved as kids likely wouldn’t hold up to adult scrutiny.So when it comes to nostalgia and recreating those dishes, it’s a tricky balancing act to retain the essential elements that we remember and love, while heading off the less appealing parts.So, in bringing this dish back to life, it has to be close enough to the original that it delights in the same way but not so saccharine that you consign it to the past.Cornflake tart is a very sweet pudding, of course it is: it’s got it all going on, jam, golden syrup, brown sugar — so a simple, unsweetened pastry is needed as the base.But actually, if you’re not wedded to nostalgic authenticity, a layer of marmalade would be fantastic, bringing in a contrasting bitter note, and a lift from the winter citrus.They use milk powder to bring out a deeper, more complex flavor in the cornflakes as they cook (Heston Blumenthal does a similar thing by using milk powder on his roast chicken) as well as a slower, longer bake on the cornflakes to increase their caramelization.Knead very briefly with floured hands until you can push the dough into a thick disc; wrap in clingfilm and refrigerate for an hour.Once the pastry has rested, remove it from the fridge, unwrap, and place on a lightly floured worktop.Remove immediately from the heat, and stir through the golden syrup, salt, sugar and milk powder. .

Cornflake Tart 2.0

Cornflake Tart 2.0

Cornflake Tart 2.0

Today I’ve been inspired by childhood memories of glorious cornflake tart - IYKYK, but IYDKDWCIGY (that means If You Don’t Know Don’t Worry ‘Cos I Got You) - and I present my Cornflake Tart 2.0: This time it’s Rhubarb.It costs just £5 and you get access to lots of extra content, inc the full archive all while supporting the writing (yay!My boyfriend grew up in the Midwest USA which means we rely on totally different foods for comfort: I don’t get the same hug-in-a-bite from a Reese’s Butter Cup, or a spoonful of Kraft Macaroni and cheese.If you grew up eating school dinners in the UK, there’s a high probability you know the joy of cornflake tart, a dessert that holds a very special place in my memory.I was always happy when cornflake tart was on the menu - it was much better than the pallid chocolate sponge & custard combo, in my opinion.Once re-baked, it is extra crunchy and fun to eat, especially with splodges of butter and caramelised sugar throughout.So for today’s recipe, I’ve decided to do a take on the fruit crumb topped pie and have paired it with a bright rhubarb filling.As I’m sure you know, there is a whole category of pastry chef embellishments which I affectionately call ‘crunchy stuff’.From caramelised nuts to tuiles to honeycombs to cookie crumbs, pastry kitchens are filled with tubs of addicting nibbles that are added to desserts for texture, or sprinkled on top of tarts as a design flourish.One of a pastry kitchen’s BFF is feuilletine - thin crispy french pancake shards.Although it is lovely, it’s quite hard to come by or you need to buy it in kilo sacks which is about 500x more than you’ll ever be able to sensibly use at home before it goes off.So, if you don’t fancy making an entire pie and want something a bit more transportable, I can highly recommend these rhubarb double cornflake bars which is available on KP+ now:.Although I have a soft spot for that slightly raw and soggy school-dinner pastry, I think that’s an experience I’m happy to leave as a memory.I’ve chronicled my adventures in search of my ideal pie dough before and we’ll be using that as our base today.This is why shortcrust pastry doughs seem to have relatively low hydration (this recipe for shortcrust on the Great British Chefs website has just 15ml water to 250g flour, but all the butter is rubbed in) compared to today’s pie dough.Depending on what recipe you are following, you will be instructed to rub the butter into the flour to varying degrees.We’ve discussed this before in the XXL Cheese scones and quiche recipe, but when it comes to flaky doughs, (butter) size matters.So, to sum it up: The more you rub in the butter, the less liquid you need and therefore the less water that comes in contact with the flour resulting in gluten (potential for toughness).As we’re dealing with chunks of butter that melt, enrich then steam, this pastry wants to MOVE.Docking is the action of putting small holes in your pastry to ‘allow steam to escape’ - as we are dealing with a semi laminated dough that is filled with large chunks of butter, this is genuinely necessary and it does help the pastry from billowing up.Although I do like creme anglaise, I’ve never found it as satisfying as proper thick yellow custard.The bird's powdered stuff is the classic of my childhood but I wanted to create a recipe for what I’ve affectionately named ‘school custard’.I took a simple creme anglaise recipe and played around with it to get it to the texture (and hue) deserving of its name.In recent years, we’ve all become discerning consumers of eggs and their golden yolks and have become collectively obsessed with this ultra orange hue, believing that the mark of a ‘good egg’ is inextricably linked to the colour.The colour of an egg yolk is exclusively determined by pigment molecules called ‘carotenoids’.Clarence Court, purveyors of the gorgeous Burford Brown eggs, use both marigolds and paprika to achieve the orange yolk, too.All of this to say, you can still have a bright yellow yolked egg that has come from a good, free-range environment but it probably just means the hens didn’t have the same access to the biodiverse pastures or specially engineered diet.It’s worth keeping in mind that the look of your yolks is a wonderful reminder of the food chain that we are very much part of.All this to say is, today’s school custard MUST be made with super pigmented yolks to have max nostalgia factor.Birds custard (which, plot twist, is vegan) powder uses the natural colour ‘Annatto Norbixin’ for that bright yellow shine, as does Sainsbury’s fresh custard, so although the increased egg yolk overall % helps, get the super bright yolks for highest impact.At 84c, the proteins in the yolks have unravelled and linked together in a process called ‘coagulating’ (As a side note, if you take it beyond 84c, the proteins continue to make bonds which makes them clump together, resulting in a cursed and lumpy / split custard).So, egg yolks only have so much power which means we need the help of starch to get a really thick luscious texture.The liquid is unable to move (as much) and the swollen starch granules result in a thickened texture.To reach full thickening power, it’s recommended to boil the starch-bound mixtures for a minute or so, which can also help meld the starch flavour.Although I spend most of my life trying not to keep rhubarb in ‘just cooked’ and shapely state, I have a different motive when it comes to pie.This is because you need to make sure two things have happened: 1) Enough water has evaporated from the fruit and 2) the starch has reached gelatinisation temperature.I’ve definitely erred on the side of ‘danger’ with the level of thickener - this is a juicy pie at its best!You could totally make this in a tart case with shortcrust pastry - you will need a little less rhubarb, probably.If you fancy a classic cornflake tart, spread a thin layer of jam (rhubarb compote recipe here) in the base of a fully baked tart/pie case and make a 1.5x batch of the cornflake topping and bake til just golden.If the edges of your pie case are already quite dark from blind baking, cover with foil to shield the crust.Use a spoon or spatula to scrape the milk solids as they will want to stick to the bottom of the pan. .

How to make Cornflake Tarts

How to make Cornflake Tarts

How to make Cornflake Tarts

The only thing I remember hating was the cabbage which they served minced and overcooked.So don’t be afraid to leave some lumps of fat in this instead of trying to get only tiny crumbs.Don’t trim all the pastry off the edges, but leave some overhang and then chill again for 15-20 minutes while the oven heats up to 180ºC.Line the pastry with greaseproof paper and fill it with rice or dried beans and blind bake for 12 minutes.In the meantime, heat together the butter, sugar and golden syrup in a saucepan until it is all melted and runny.Remove the baking beans or rice and prick the base of the pastry several times with a fork.Sprinkle the cornflake mixture over the top of the jam, making sure you don’t skimp.I can’t help you here as custard is my nemesis and my most recent attempt at heating some fresh stuff from Sainsbury’s ended with me curdling it!I ate my tarts just as they were and they tasted exactly like I remember, but actually slightly better for not being made with marge and cheap jam or washed down with tepid water in a metal beaker!Do you have a school dinner memory that’s surprisingly good or was it all crimes against food? .

Cornflake Tart

Cornflake Tart

Cornflake Tart

A pastry base topped with jam then piled high with sweetened cornflakes, it was a school dinner staple.Our cornflake tart has had a little upgrade, swapping jam for Nutella, and the beautiful addition of chocolate custard, because C'MON you can't get more nostalgic than that!cornflour 2 large egg yolks This ingredient shopping module is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page.Roll the pastry out on a lightly floured surface until it is 2-3mm thick and large enough to line a 23cm loose-bottomed tart tin.Heat the butter, syrup and sugar in a medium saucepan with a pinch of salt, stirring frequently, until melted and smooth.This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. .

Easy Cornflake Tart

Easy Cornflake Tart

Easy Cornflake Tart

It uses simple store cupboard ingredients such as cornflakes, golden syrup, jam and sugar.Serve the tart with custard for that very nostalgic taste of school dinners, either warm or cold.The great thing about this tasty tart, is that it’s so easily made and adapted, depending on what you have to hand.You must have the cornflakes to make it work, as well as a pastry case, but after that you can invent and adapt as I have suggested below.But back in the early 20th Century, cooked breakfasts were the norm, with bacon and eggs being a commonly served breakfast in the UK, and a variety of pancakes with bacon, eggs and sausages being the choice of most Americans.Then, one day in 1896, two years after William Kellogg invented the now famous breakfast cereal for his brother’s patients in a Battle Creek Sanitarium, Americans woke up to a new breakfast that was fast and easy to serve and eat.By 1909, Kellogg’s Corn Flakes were as a common sight on most American breakfast tables as pancakes and syrup!Although to achieve that nostalgic school dinner taste, you need to use strawberry jam and golden syrup, I’ve added a few ideas for variations below.Just add some squares of broken up chocolate to the cornflakes mixture, melt and then spoon into small cake cases.Make the filling – heat the butter, golden syrup and sugar together in a large pan, until is has all melted. .

Cornflake Tart – Deja Food

Cornflake Tart – Deja Food

Cornflake Tart – Deja Food

A trip down my own personal memory lane this week, with a classic of the school dinner repertoire, Cornflake Tart.In the 1970s and 1980s, long before the advent of the dreaded turkey twizzler, my mother was a supervisor of a kitchen that cooked dinners for seven schools in the local area, including the one I attended, so I am perhaps more familiar than most with the full range of tasty, economical and wholesome home-cooking-style meals of that era.Whilst some dishes (spamspamspamspam) left me cold and some serving decisions (tinned tomatoes + cheese tart always = soggy tomato-juice pastry) lacking in thought, the desserts were almost (I’m looking at you, semolina-and-red-jam-blob) universally adored.You can use any recipe you like, even buy ready-made if time is short, but I would like to strongly recommend my cornflour shortcrust for this particular tart, for a number of reasons.I actually prefer the pastry in this recipe to be gluten-free, as the crumbly texture is fantastic against the sharp jam and sweet, crunchy cornflakes.You can use any kind of jam you have to hand, and strawberry seems to be a popular choice, but I recommend something sharp, to contrast with the sweetness of the caramelised cornflakes.Raspberry is good, as is blackberry (see photos), blackcurrant, cranberry, redcurrant, apricot or even apple butter.Make the pastry: Put the flours and butter into the bowl of a food processor and blitz until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.With the machine running, gradually add the cold water a tablespoon at a time until the mixture comes together in a ball.For the gluten-free pastry, roll it out onto parchment cut to size, then lift into the tin and shape the corners/edges with your fingertips.Allow the sugar mixture to simmer gently for 5 minutes then pour over the cornflakes and toss thoroughly to coat.When the pastry is baked, spread the warm jam over the base of the tart and add the cornflakes.Slice the cold tart into portions with a sharp knife and store in an airtight container.Deliciously light and airy scones are just as easily made, using Mrs McNab’s 19th century recipe from Great British Bakes.One slight variation to the method is that, due to the lack of gluten, there is a tendency for the dough to spread during baking.Put the flour, cream of tartar, bicarbonate of soda, salt, butter and egg into the bowl of a food processor and blitz until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.If your oven doesn’t have this function, then brown lightly under a grill but don’t leave them too long or they will burn. .

Cornflake Jam Tart

Cornflake Jam Tart

Cornflake Jam Tart

Cornflake Jam Tart – A homemade buttery, flaky crust that is filled with a layer of raspberry jam, and topped with a generous layer of caramel covered Cornflakes.Caramel covered Cornflakes, raspberry jam, a homemade crust – all put together to make one totally irresistible tart.This tart consists of a homemade flaky, buttery crust that is then lined with a layer of raspberry jam, and topped with a generous amount of Cornflakes coated in caramel.You can find my recipe card at the bottom of this post for the complete list with their amounts.On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out into a 12-inch circle, then gently place into a 23cm/9-inch fluted tart tin with a loose base.Line the chilled pastry crust loosely with parchment paper, and fill almost to the top with uncooked rice (or use baking beans).Brush the base and sides of the crust with beaten egg, bake for a further 10 minutes, then remove from the oven.Place the caramels and evaporated milk in a large microwave-safe bowl, and heat in 30 second intervals, stirring after each one, until melted and smooth.Spoon the caramel Cornflake mixture on top of the jam, and gently spread out evenly.The printable recipe card with the FULL list of ingredients and instructions can be found at the bottom of this post.Leave a comment, rate it, and don’t forget to tag me on Instagram and hashtag it #marshasbakingaddiction.Subscribe to my newsletter to receive recipe updates straight to your inbox. .

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